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The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings

Score Breakdown Based on 7490 ratings

  1. 10 (4088)
  2. 9 (2201)
  3. 8 (568)
  4. 7 (216)
  5. 6 (113)
  6. 5 (73)
  7. 4 (34)
  8. 3 (28)
  9. 2 (51)
  10. 1 (118)
  • Less, yet more

    By Voldy26 | Review Date: Oct 28, 2017 | PC

    If you have only played the third installment and are wondering if you should check out this one, the answer is "definitely yes". Graphics-wise, the difference is not that great, the mechanics are more or less the same, ... Read Full Review

    1 of 1 users found the following review helpful
  • A game that deserved more prominence.

    By phantomdark | Review Date: Jun 10, 2017 | PC

    In 2007 was released The Witcher game based on the books of Andrzej Sapkowski Wiedzmin (which was translated as Witcher), and the company that made the game was CD Projekt Red, a company that made an ambitious game even ... Read Full Review

    1 of 1 users found the following review helpful
  • A game that deserved more prominence.

    By netosilva | Review Date: May 12, 2017 | X360

    In 2007 was released The Witcher game based on the books of Andrzej Sapkowski Wiedzmin (which was translated as Witcher), and the company that made the game was CD Projekt Red, a company that made an ambitious game even ... Read Full Review

    1 of 1 users found the following review helpful
  • Spectacular but imperfect

    By masterpinky2000 | Review Date: Dec 08, 2015 | X360

    The Witcher 2 may exemplify the wisdom that it's better to fail spectacularly than to succeed forgettably. Which is not to say that this game is a failure--far from it. But I do believe, having just completed this game... Read Full Review

    1 of 2 users found the following review helpful
  • The Witcher 2: Assassin of Kings

    By aem1tchellma | Review Date: Jul 07, 2015 | PC

    In honour of The Witcher 3’s release this week, Steam was frankly giving away the first two titles in the The Witcher series, and to have refused their kind offer would have been worse than slapping them in the fac... Read Full Review

    1 of 1 users found the following review helpful
  • Not so bad

    By lothemar | Review Date: Mar 29, 2015 | PC

    Game is good though some misses. Story is good! Reminds of Game of Thrones series. Gameplay could have been better. But all in all, the game is awesome! They should add more sword fight moves and more abilities to use as... Read Full Review

    1 of 1 users found the following review helpful
  • Overrated

    By TheBruuz | Review Date: Jun 21, 2014 | PC

    I'm baffled at the score this game gets. I just picked it up on Steam for 4 EUR, thinking I might just check out what the fuss was all about. I had played the first Witcher game, but was quite disappointed with the game-... Read Full Review

    3 of 4 users found the following review helpful
  • A great story-driven RPG.

    By Shelledfade1 | Review Date: Mar 11, 2014 | PC

    PROS:Length: Roughly 45 hours, depending if you play harder difficulty modes (dark mode) which require gold grind, which requires additional play time.Crafting armor and swordsMultiple difficulty settingsGorgeous visuals... Read Full Review

    1 of 1 users found the following review helpful
Sours: https://www.gamespot.com/games/the-witcher-2-assassins-of-kings/reviews/

The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings Review

The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings is a gift, gilded with moments that stay with you even after the curtains close on its dark tale of uncertain pasts and uncertain futures. Like the rare Roses of Remembrance you might find growing in this role-playing game's lush fields, these moments are carefully cultivated. They're meaningful not just because they are packed with excitement, but also because there are stakes--both personal and political. As Geralt of Rivia, your actions don't just bring you closer to the truths of your own murky history, but they also influence the tides of war. And just as you exert your power on this game's events, they work their power on you, drawing you further into a gorgeous world populated by quarrelling trolls and drunken, sex-crazed dwarves. Some bugs, combat quirks, and other foibles prove bothersome, but they don't greatly diminish the impact of exploring a dungeon whose walls ooze the agony you've just witnessed. This superb role-playing sequel offers a bold world woven together by tenuous alliances and closely guarded secrets.

The Witcher 2's phenomenal visual design isn't its defining characteristic, but it's an effective lure and makes for an immediate connection with the game's provocative tone. On the outskirts of a dwarven enclave, sunlight glistens upon a misty pond; a tower just beyond it bristles with potent magical properties; the underbrush surrounding you casts deep shadows, yet rays of golden sun coax you onward. In The Witcher 2, sights like these communicate so much. The delicate lace of a sorceress's collar gives her a regal air, yet dark makeup and dark brown eyes speak to mysteries beneath the surface. A red scar above a defiant elf's upper lip is not just a testament to past violence--it suggests a permanent scowl. Walls, cliffs, and meadows aren't just repeated textures. Look closely at the patterns carved into a stone column, and you notice how each one is slightly different. These may seem like unimportant details, but they're indicators of how much care went into every facet of this game's environments and character models.

The superlative art is rendered by equally superlative technology that ensures you can admire the rips on a mercenary's trousers, a harpy's individual feathers, and the buckles and seams on Geralt's clothing. Yet The Witcher 2 is as much about grand gestures as it is textural detail. You cross paths with a giant dragon and other grotesqueries, each of which moves with a sense of weight appropriate to the creature's proportions. Pungent colors, roaring flames, and shafts of glowing light make mainstay environments like sewers and caves a wonder to explore. Impressively, all of this beauty is rendered using DirectX 9 technology rather than the newer DirectX 11. The game is nevertheless demanding of your hardware, though it is attractive even at lower settings. A few imperfections stand out amidst all the graphical wizardry, such as mechanical facial animations, characters that pop in during cutscenes, and the occasional frame rate dip. But such quibbles are easily tolerated in this luxuriant digital world.

All that glitters is not gold.

And what a world it is, alive with activity yet tinged with violence and sorrow. The opening moments ready you for the game's brutal overtones, showing a captive Geralt of Rivia whipped and taunted by his jailers. Geralt's defaced flesh is not an easy sight to take in, but it's thematically relevant: The witcher is scarred by his past. Geralt, once thought dead, is still piecing together his memories of a savage battle and a beauty called Yennefer. The story takes its cue from these lost memories, juxtaposing violence and sex. It also presents both as inevitable and natural results of the human (and nonhuman) condition. You can still bed various women in The Witcher 2, as you could in the original game, though you no longer collect sex cards. Lovemaking (or ploughing, as so many characters call it) is a frequent subject of conversation, and it's one of Geralt's favorite pastimes. You can bed a few different women, and the game hardly shies from nudity, handily earning its mature rating. The lacerations on Geralt's back are a stark reminder, however, that this earthly pleasure is only a temporary respite for him.

But The Witcher 2 is not primarily about sex, nor violence. It's about the search for truth. Geralt seeks clues to his past, as well as the royal assassin that ended the life of King Foltest at the conclusion of The Witcher. This man's identity is not a secret for long, but then, this is not a murder mystery; rather, it's a chronicle of discovery, redemption, and political upheaval. Geralt is blamed for Foltest's murder, but as he gets closer to the true killer, he becomes more and more involved in the region's power struggles. Not including the prologue and epilogue, The Witcher 2 is split into three acts. The first is primarily concerned with following the killer's trail, while the second greatly expands the plot, introducing so many new characters and so much lore that you might be initially confused. Yet, the convoluted plot seems poised to explode in the final episode, only to fizzle at the end. The lack of closure intimates a sequel, and it makes the final act feel abrupt when compared to the robustness of the first two.

Harpies of a feather shriek together.

Characters new and old both assist and hinder Geralt's quest. These include the flamboyant bard Dandelion and the earthy Zoltan, a foul-mouthed dwarf who, like most of The Witcher 2's dwarves, loves women and drink. Dwarves are a rich source of humor in most role-playing games, and The Witcher 2's are no exception. Yet, the tone is different here. These are the raunchiest dwarves you've ever encountered, yet the comedy is undercut by underlying anguish. It's initially funny to learn that teetotaling dwarves are outcasts. But when a dwarf confides that he fears being ostracized because he doesn't drink, you understand his dread. You might admire a bearded character's enthusiasm for heading to battle for the first time, but when pressed, he admits his misgivings. Aside from the occasional expository speech, most of the dialogue sounds natural, including the asides spoken by random citizens. Most of the voice actors do a good job of bringing these characters to life, in spite of the occasional hollow note. (The actress playing Triss Merigold again sounds like a random meter maid rushed into the studio for some last-minute line readings.)

The Witcher 2 is not an open-world game in the way of The Elder Scrolls games; each area is relatively contained though expansive enough to encourage exploration. The rewards for doing so aren't just pretty vistas. You might uncover a chest that can be opened only by interpreting the clues on a nearby scroll or stumble upon a giant arachnid guarding treasure. However, the game's flexibility isn't a result of wide-open journeys; it is the extraordinary ways you can influence the story and fundamentally change the direction of your future travels. For example, choices you make at the end of Act 1 not only determine how immediate story events play out, but also have a dramatic impact on the entire game. The characters at your side, the enemies you face, the dialogue--they all differ based on a series of decisions that the game never forgets. And these aren't "good" or "bad" choices: these are ambiguous circumstances with ambiguous results, which is just as well. Geralt is not interested in heroism or villainy. He navigates turbulent waters seeking neither justice nor injustice, only answers.

A number of stupendous moments punctuate your choices. Typically, the events you most fondly recall from RPGs are story related: the characters, the plot twists, the losses, the finales. By contrast, The Witcher 2 etches gameplay events into your imagination. What you remember most isn't just what you witness, but what you experience firsthand. Once such moment occurs when a large clash on a battlefield causes it to become awash with a golden supernatural mist. This moment is recalled several times later yet retains its power due to its otherworldly ambience, sense of scale, and fun combat. Its terrifying scream makes your first encounter with a harpy unforgettable. Viewing another's memory, taking on a ghostly identity, and other inspired occurrences plant seeds of apprehension: you never know what might be lurking around the bend.

If you played the original Witcher, then forget what you learned from its combat mechanics. The Witcher 2 abandons that rhythmic system for a more traditional and challenging one. You still switch between silver and steel swords, depending on whether you are facing monsters or humans, but regardless of the weapon you equip, be prepared for the occasional beatdown. You initiate standard attacks with your mouse, and you block and cast signs (Geralt's magic spells) with the keyboard. (You may also use a gamepad.) Your first encounter during the prologue/tutorial makes for a punishing introduction: Expect to die a few times as you learn just what the game expects of you. The extreme difficulty right off the bat, paired with tutorial hints that don't pop up long enough or soon enough to be much help, don't make for the friendliest introduction. But you learn an important lesson: You must tread carefully. Eventually you grasp the rhythm, which is similar to that of the PlayStation 3 game Demon's Souls. You must position yourself well and pay close attention to your supply of vigor, which is required to block, as well as cast signs; get in a few choice hits; and then block or tumble into a safer position. You may also want to soften the enemy or control the crowd by throwing bombs (blind them!) or laying traps (turn enemies on each other!), particularly during the first act, when you feel most vulnerable.

Even after you grow accustomed to The Witcher 2's combat, there are a few scenarios that are more than just difficult: They are cruel. A couple of boss fights are frustrating, as is a quest in a dark cramped mine that has multiple dwarves crowding you, all while you are hounded by fiendish foes that explode upon death. It's too easy to inadvertently tumble toward an enemy behind the one you meant to attack and find yourself in the center of a deadly mob. Yet, the action is largely satisfying and enjoyable. There's a great sense of weight in every swing. Geralt might somersault toward his victim and slash him with a steel sword or use a flaming staff pilfered from a succubus to land slower, heavier blows. As you level up and spend skill points in four different skill paths (witcher training, swordsmanship, magic, alchemy), combat becomes more manageable, and you begin to feel more powerful. And yet, the action never becomes a cakewalk, and it always retains a sense of urgency.

Even when you know danger is ahead, the views are too gorgeous not to press onward.

And so death is inescapable, but The Witcher 2 allows you to properly prepare before trying to conquer the wilds. You aren't stuck with the same weapons and armor, of course. You loot new ones or buy them from vendors, and these can be upgraded in various ways. You might also purchase equipment schematics and have a vendor craft items for you using the iron ore, timber, and other raw materials you stumble upon as you explore. You can also brew up potions and quaff them, though you can't just down a health drink in the midst of battle. Instead, you must down potions while meditating. Meditation is a returning mechanic, though you no longer have to find a campfire as in the first game. Potions are toxic to Geralt; thus, the number you can drink is limited. It might take you a while to come to terms with this "prepare in advance" approach to potions. Brews act as statistic buffs rather than immediate cure-alls, and unless you know what monsters you might be coming up against, you don't necessarily know which potions to take. When the story snatches you up into a series of battles and cutscenes, you may never be allowed to meditate and, thus, never reap the benefits potions may have granted.

It may also take some time getting used to the interface. It isn't complex but there are some minor idiosyncrasies, some of which are rather sensible. You can't hold a key to identify loot and items of interest as you can in most RPGs; instead, you activate Geralt's medallion. It's a neat way of taking a game-y function and making it seem more natural. Other interface quirks are less understandable. You can't quickly identify and sell vendor trash, for example, and there is no easy way to compare the equipment a merchant has for sale with your current stuff. These are minor quibbles, however. Not so minor are the few quest bugs that can aggravate your travels. A quest marker and journal entry may refuse to update when completing an action, leaving you to wonder what to do next; choosing dialogue options in a particular order might lead to a similar circumstance. The only solution to these circumstances is to hope you accidentally stumble upon the next phase of the story or reload a previous game save. These are disappointing errors in a well-made game with an otherwise stellar presentation.

Shorty's no match for Geralt's great guns.

Combat is central to The Witcher 2, but it's not the only way to pass the time. Dice poker returns and works much the same way as in the original. Proving your mettle with your fists is a more consistent way of earning some extra coin, however. You can trade blows with certain locals, though you may cringe when you first learn that doing so entails quick-time key presses--the kind associated more with console action games than computer RPGs. (Such quick-time events crop up in various boss fights and other scripted sequences as well.) Yet, the game hardly relies on them too much, and the close camera angles and barbaric punches give brawls some pizzazz. An arm-wrestling minigame is much less enjoyable, forcing you to keep a sluggish cursor within the proper boundaries. And, of course, certain characters (and the town's task board) will have some odd jobs for you, many of which involve the game's signature moral dilemmas. Who do you believe: a mythical seductress accused of murder or the elf jealous of her many lovers? When each accuser is equally unconvincing, you must carefully consider your path. And in this complicated world, just as in the real one, there isn't necessarily a right or wrong choice--or a neat resolution.

Like many ambitious games, The Witcher 2 requires you to shoulder some minor burdens; in this case, it's a finale without bite and some unfortunate bugs. Yet, you rarely sense that any given element suffered because more attention was given to another. This distinguished game makes an important statement: Visual beauty, challenging action, and game-changing decisions can coexist in a modern RPG. In one beauteous stroke, The Witcher 2 has raised the stakes. No longer need we accept that role-playing games must sacrifice the quality of one element in favor of another. Instead, we are allowed to have it all. And how wonderful that we have it right here, right now, in The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings.

Sours: https://www.gamespot.com/reviews/the-witcher-2-assassins-of-kings-review/1900-6314759/
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The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings

I'm in love...

User Rating: 9 | The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings (Enhanced Edition) X360

By WCAR18 | Review Date:

The Witcher 2 Review:

To start my review of The Witcher 2. I will start by saying... I bought the game day one. Yep, I paid the $60 for the 360 version. I came home that night played a few hours and had mixed feelings. I eventually stop playing it and let it sit for a couple months untouched. I then decided to trade it in for $20. Damn... that is a $40 dollar loss. :( Well... 2 weeks passed and I bought The Witcher for $3 from Steam. So I decided. I need to get The Witcher 2 back because I'm an idiot. I ended up working out a way to get it back for $5. Yay me! Haha! I am happy I did. Now lets start the review...

Plot: (Taken from Wikipedia) Not going to waste my time typing out the plot! :)

The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings contains many different paths and storylines, along with multiple endings. As in the first game, the player takes control of Geralt of Rivia, one of the few remaining witchers. Witchers are humans that have been genetically enhanced and trained to fight monsters from a young age. They have special powers, different in each witcher. These include alchemy, magic, and sword handling.

(Me) I will add, that the game is about Geralt recovering his lost memory as he tracks/pursues the assassin who has killed several Kings. Hence the name of the game.

Gameplay:

The gameplay for The Witcher 2 is action based. No taking turns here. Very fast paced, fluid movements and strikes with your weapons. It reminds me of a Fable feel but better in my opinion. There are magical abilities to use and Geralt carries 2 swords. He can carry a Steel and Silver sword. Steel generally does good damage to humans while the Silver works well with beasts and creatures you will meet along the way. So that brings in some strategy to the game. Also, with the magic abilities you need to adjust based off your enemy. For instance (Not a spoiler)... I fought a boss and he was on fire and powerful with his attacks. So I had to adjust my magic. No reason to shoot fire at him like I did with humans. I instead... took a defensive approach by using my magic shield to take away some of the damage he could possibly bring. This is common in most RPG but it was well done in The Witcher 2. Very satisfying combat indeed.

Presentation:

I played The Witcher 2 on the 360. Although it doesn't compare to the PC versions graphics. It is still well done. There are some glitching or odd movements because you can tell the 360 struggles to handle the game. But overall it is a beautiful game. The menus are very easy to use. Really my only gripe is that I can't play this on a PC because I don't own a nice gaming PC to handle a game like this. Other than that... this is a gorgeous game with great scenery to explore. The worlds remind me of Dragon Age. Just bigger and better.

Final Word:

The Witcher 2 is the reason I game. It has a lot in common with the Mass Effect/Dragon Age style games but does a great job of being itself and doing it well. I loved the plot after I finally got into the game. A third way through the game. The choices and decisions you face/have to make the rest of the way through the game. Are heavy and difficult. It literally stressed me out. I had no clue who to trust? What to believe? What I should do? If I do this, how will it effect the others I have become close too? These questions race through your head and you only have a few seconds to decide what you are going to do. Well Done I say! Well done. That is what I love the most about The Witcher 2. I will mark the score down in one area. The end of the game was a little unsatisfying. I won't go into why. No spoiler zone. But I know I'm not alone in my reasons. I highly suggest this title. You will get your monies worth. Trust me.

Story 9.0
Gameplay 8.5
Presentation 9.0
Final Word 9.0
Sours: https://www.gamespot.com/the-witcher-2-assassins-of-kings/user-reviews/2200-80278/

The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings - Enhanced Edition Review

The monster slayer speaks to the soldier with quiet confidence. He signals with his fingers, his yellow eyes shine, and the soldier reveals his secrets without the slayer ever needing to unsheathe his sword. The witcher is gifted for his patience, and now, Xbox 360 owners are similarly rewarded: one of 2011's finest adventures has come to Microsoft's console, and it was well worth the wait. The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings - Enhanced Edition is a treat for the mind and a joy for the senses. This superb role-playing game hits hard, drawing you into its dark fantasy world and requiring you to make difficult choices with palpable consequences. As Geralt of Rivia--the titular witcher--you seek answers in lush landscapes and burning battlefields, where great despair casts long shadows on even the sunniest meadows and lakes.

You may have heard about the stupendous visuals of The Witcher 2 on the PC, and probably wonder: how does the Xbox 360 version compare? It should be no surprise that the console release can't match its higher-resolution PC counterpart, which was a standard-setter on that platform. Shadows are less extensive, the draw distance isn't quite as astonishing, and some texture pop-in, jittery transitions, and longer loading times will stand out to anyone who has seen the game running at the highest settings on the PC.

And yet there is no reason to suppose you are getting a halfhearted PC-to-console port here. The Witcher 2 is wonderful to look at, brimming with visual details that refuse to be lost in spite of the hardware's limitations. Inspect the crumbling walls of an ancient city, and you notice how every rock, rune, and fissure is unique. Nothing looks copied and pasted, but either painstakingly crafted by hand or hewn by natural forces. Soldiers genuflect as royalty passes, yet they're not unnaturally synchronized, but instead bow and rise as individuals. A gorgeous waterfall makes for a glistening tapestry, behind which lies darkness and death. A red scar above a defiant elf's upper lip is not just a testament to past conflict--it suggests a permanent scowl.

Welcome to the world of The Witcher 2, which is alive with activity yet tinged with violence and sorrow. The opening moments ready you for the game's brutal overtones, showing a captive Geralt of Rivia whipped and taunted by his jailers. Geralt's defaced flesh is a horrific sight, but thematically relevant: he is scarred by his past. Once thought dead, he is still piecing together memories of a savage battle and a beauty called Yennefer. The story takes its cue from these lost memories, juxtaposing sex and brutailty. It also presents both as inevitable and natural results of the mortal condition. You can bed various women in The Witcher 2; ploughing (that is, sex) is a frequent subject of conversation, and one of Geralt's favorite pastimes.

Even the most attractive sights are tainted by grief and brutality.

Prostitutes and lusty soldiers are commonplace in The Witcher 2, though women are hardly relegated to carnal duties. The game's female characters hold great sway in the political landscape, including Saskia the Dragonslayer. This freedom fighter speaks with such force and confidence that it's no surprise she should command a dedicated following. Her nemesis is King Henselt, whose arrogance and robust brogue make him an equally authoritative presence. They are both voiced with great gusto, and contrast with Geralt's cool, measured delivery. And that's as it should be: Henselt and Saskia must inspire their disciples. Geralt, known as the White Wolf, is also a lone wolf.

They are but a few players in The Witcher 2's tangled political plot, which involves so many characters and so much lore that you might be initially confused. But even when things get twisty, the fearless Geralt is there to ground the story. The witcher searches for clues to his past, as well as the royal assassin that ended the life of King Foltest. If you didn't play The Witcher on PC, don't worry that you'll feel lost: the prologue does an excellent job of catching you up on what you need to know. Nor do you need to wonder about the assassin's identity; it doesn't remain a secret for long, and it's quickly clear that The Witcher 2 is no murder mystery.

Instead, The Witcher 2 is a chronicle of discovery, redemption, and political upheaval. Geralt is blamed for Foltest's murder, but as he gets closer to the true killer, he becomes more and more involved in the region's power struggles. Those assisting Geralt on his quest include the flamboyant bard Dandelion and the earthy Zoltan, a foul-mouthed dwarf who, like most of The Witcher 2's dwarves, loves women and drink. Dwarves are a rich source of humor in most role-playing games, and The Witcher 2's are no exception. Yet, the tone is different here. These are the raunchiest dwarves you've ever encountered, yet the comedy is undercut by underlying anguish.

Lifting curses is hard work.

In fact, a deep undercurrent of pain and suffering flows beneath each character and event. A mother's unspoken agony taints the wonder of childbirth. A father's drive to protect his son may brand him a coward in his own progeny's eyes, but it's a price he's willing to pay, and Geralt isn't one to turn down a bit of coin--or in this case, some pertinent information. Many quests, including those new to this edition, involve the game's signature moral dilemmas. Whom do you believe: a soldier with hygiene problems haunted by a wraith, or the wraith that accuses the soldier of her own murder? Do you absolve a pair of nobles of treason, condemn them, or spare one and sacrifice the other? In this complicated world, there isn't necessarily a right choice. There is no meter to determine whether you are being "good" or "bad," and Geralt is neither hero nor villain.

Not including the prologue and epilogue, The Witcher 2 is split into three acts. The first is primarily concerned with following the killer's trail, while the second greatly expands the plot. The convoluted plot seems poised to explode in the final episode, only to fizzle at the end. The lack of closure intimates a sequel, and the final act is abrupt when compared to the robustness of the first two. Nevertheless, there is no reason to feel slighted, as the journey is entertaining and reasonably lengthy, given several hours of additional gameplay over the PC version's initial release. Yet what makes The Witcher 2 most impressive isn't its length or its vastness; it isn't an open-world, content-stuffed game in the way of the Elder Scrolls series. Instead, its triumph is in how your decisions fundamentally transform your journey.

The Witcher 2 is essentially multiple games gracefully molded into a single experience. The second act, for instance, tells a very different tale depending on choices you make beforehand. You might comb beaches and battlefields or go spelunking with a group of profane dwarves at your side, in each case making a different region your base of operations. By their very flexibility, many RPGs inspire replay, but few offer such differing paths, allowing you to experience a complex narrative from distinct points of view. The characters at your side, the enemies you face, the dialogue--they all differ based on a series of decisions that the game never forgets.

As it turns out, trolls don't pay taxes on the bridge tolls they collect.

Cities and wilderness areas are relatively contained, though just extensive enough to encourage exploration. In doing so, you might uncover a chest that can be opened only by interpreting the clues on a nearby scroll, or stumble upon a giant arachnid guarding treasure. A number of stupendous action moments punctuate your travels. You won't remember just the big story developments, but the sequences in which you clutch your sword and stare down the danger ahead with savage resolve. In one such scenario, you slash away at grotesque representations of hate and violence, the whispers of magical incantations barely rising above the distant noise of steel on steel. Elsewhere, terrifying screams and flurries of feathers make your first encounter with a gaggle of harpies unforgettable, and the squawks and growls of unseen wildlife intensify your showdown with an endrega queen.

While there are a few different kinds of weapons you might wield, you usually choose between your silver and steel swords, depending on whether you are facing monsters or humans. You perform both light and heavy attacks from a third-person view, and can block and cast signs (Geralt's magic spells) as well. Before you leap into the prologue, you might want to check out the tutorial, though it isn't strictly necessary, as the first proper combat encounter isn't nearly as punishing as it was on the PC. It might take you a few tries, but you eventually grasp the rhythm of swordplay. Crowd control is important: you want to avoid getting surrounded at all costs, and bombs and traps can make all the difference when the odds look overwhelming.

The Xbox 360 release benefits from a reasonable difficulty curve, but there are some frustrations here and there. The manual targeting system is fiddly enough that you'll likely let the game's auto-targeting take over for you, unless you face a single enemy, or maybe two. You might inadvertently tumble toward an enemy behind the one you meant to attack and find yourself in the center of a deadly mob. There are also moments when basic actions don't feel as responsive as they should; unsheathing your sword might take a couple of button presses, for instance. Yet the action is largely satisfying and enjoyable. There's a palpable sense of weight in every swing. Geralt might somersault toward his victim and slash him with a steel sword or use a flaming staff pilfered from a succubus to land slower, heavier blows.

Friend, or foe? Your decision has far-reaching consequences on the missions that follow.
Even when you know danger is ahead, the views are too attractive not to press onward. Death is inescapable, but The Witcher 2 allows you to properly prepare before trying to conquer the wilds. You aren't stuck with the same weapons and armor, of course. You loot new ones or buy them from vendors, and these can be upgraded in various ways. You might also purchase equipment schematics and have a vendor craft items for you using the iron ore, timber, and other raw materials you stumble upon as you explore. You can also brew up potions and quaff them, though you can't just down a health drink in the midst of battle. Instead, you must down potions while meditating.

Potions are toxic to Geralt; thus, the number you can drink is limited. It might take you a while to come to terms with this "prepare in advance" approach to potions. Brews act as statistic buffs rather than immediate cure-alls, and unless you know what monsters you might be coming up against, you don't necessarily know which potions are most effective. When the story snatches you up into a series of battles and cutscenes, you may never be allowed to meditate and, thus, never reap the benefits potions may have granted. Thankfully, the long animations depicting Geralt entering and exiting his meditation pose have been removed, making this process less arduous.

It may also take some time to get used to the interface. It isn't complex but there are some minor idiosyncrasies, some of which are rather sensible. You can't hold a button to identify loot and items of interest as you can in other RPGs; instead, you activate Geralt's medallion. It's a neat way of taking a game-y function and making it seem more natural. Other interface quirks are less understandable. In most RPGs, once you exhaust a particular dialogue tree, you are usually allowed to select other options before exiting the interaction. In The Witcher 2, you might get thrown out of the conversation and have to reengage the character to explore other options. It would have been nice to compare equipment at a glance, rather than have to select a particular menu option. There are other quirks too, such as picky contextual prompts (you might disarm a trap instead of swinging at an attacking nekker), but they are small blemishes on this ambitious adventure.

You can run from this spirit--but you can't hide.

Though combat is central to The Witcher 2, it's far from the only thing you do as Geralt. You can earn some coin by trading blows with certain locals, which means performing a relatively easy sequence of quick-time button presses. Timed events show up in boss fights and in other scripted sequences as well, though the game doesn't focus on them, and they make for a fun spectacle: the close camera angles and barbaric punches give brawls a lot of pizzazz. The PC version's arm-wrestling minigame returns as well and controls far better with a controller than it did with a mouse and keyboard. You can even go get a haircut or play some dice when you aren't busy chatting up the local ladies or hearing of Zoltan's latest exploits.

The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings - Enhanced Edition is an excellent port of a superb game, embracing many of the elements we love about RPGs without skimping on any of them. But it's the way it handles player choice in particular that makes it most notable. There are no contrived right-versus-wrong decisions to exploit. The results of your decision don't just influence minor details: they lead you down wildly disparate paths, each as entertaining as the others. The Witcher 2 is a mature game indeed--not just because of its sexual themes and violent images, but because of its complex portrayal of morally ambiguous individuals struggling in a morally ambiguous world.

Sours: https://www.gamespot.com/reviews/the-witcher-2-assassins-of-kings-enhanced-edition-/1900-6372018/

2 the gamespot witcher

The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings

Witcher 2 is one of the few games designed for people that love RPG's but hate that most are designed for 10-30 crowd.

User Rating: 9.5 | The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings MAC

By dracorion | Review Date:

Witcher 2 is a RPG designed for the older market, it is sex, dugs, and extreme violence that you see, compared to most RPG's that always tilt the camera away when adult themed actions happen. The story is engrossing and the main character Geralt is a likable enough that gamers that enjoy creating their own character from scratch will not have a problem. The graphics are amazing, though if you aren't running a top end computer the lowest setting will have to suffice. The game is somewhat linear but this adds to the story, but you can make decisions that greatly affect the outcome of the game.

One improvement I'd like to see is better crafting. With the inability to create your own character, it would be nice to have much more crafting ability so that Geralt looks (by way of armor and weapons) exactly how you want him to look. In Witcher 2 you have a large amount of armor and swords you can use, but it's best to jus stick with the best armor and weapons. I'd like to be able to decide when crafting a sword the type of blade, hilt, grip and pommel. With armor there are more choices I'd like than I care to list.
Sours: https://www.gamespot.com/the-witcher-2-assassins-of-kings/user-reviews/2200-137490/
The Witcher 2 - Gamespot E3 Gameplay part 1

The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings

Luckily for The Witcher 2, an epic storyline overshadows many of the games flaws.

User Rating: 8.5 | The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings (Enhanced Edition) X360

By xyzyx000 | Review Date:

The Witcher 2 - Assasins of Kings, origionally a PC title brought to the Xbox
360 on April 17 2012. I dont usually play games set in these times but
something about this game got me interested. PC reviews were great, and as the release date drew closer reviews for the game on the Xbox 360 were also something I couldnt ignore.

About 10 hours into the game and all I could think about was wanting to write
my review, I held off till completion. What a unique game, where do I start?

Its hard to say too much of the story line without spoiling, for the games
story is truely epic and what really makes The Witcher 2 - Assasins of Kings
a good game.
What you have is your typical RPG with a few exceptions...
You will play Geralt of Rivia, a known witcher from the land of Tameria;
talented with the sword and with his magic. In the beginning of the game
Geralt is accidentaly framed for the murder of his king and sets off on an
epic journey to bring the kings slayer to justice and clear his name.

The first thing that your going to notice about the game, is its mature
content. Aside from the adult language and nudity, the story line in The
Witcher 2 is very complex. The game requires a bit of reading to fully understand whats going on, not all the cut scenes and
dialogue give full explanations and will leave the player questioning.
Amongst the games various menus are vast resources for information on
characters, locations, monsters, and even a glossary to aid with your
understanding of the story line. Im usually not a fan of spending copious
amounts of time reading while playing a game, but taking some time to take
advantage of the information given is well worth the effort.

As for The Witcher 2 graphically and for its gameplay, id say some would
agree to disagree. The game looks great but does have its fair share of
graphical issues and glitches. One thing youll notice is your characters
delays, with everything. Its almost like every time you want your character
to do anything except walk or run its noticable, from climbing, jumping down
of ledges, opening and closing doors, grabbing your sword, putting your swords away, there is always an annoying delay that ensues while the rest of the world around you continues on as usual. This is especially annoying during combat. You will also notice tons of little graphical errors during dialogues where characters and setting locations flash and move around. I even encountered a glitch where Geralts Vitality and Vigor dissapeared off the screen. My vigor would not regenerate and my health had dissapeared from the health bar, and could no longer take damage. I couldnt die. Upon leveling up everything was restored and I did not encounter the glitch again.
Another issue I noticed with the game is that you can actually get ahead of
yourself. While exploring new areas and speaking to random characters, I often found myself confused with the dialogue options because I hadnt
gotten to that part of the story yet. Your responses never altered
the gameplay but should not have been available in the first place.

Lets take about the games combat, and the learning curve. Its deffinately
different and might take some time gettting use to. Geralt has 2 swords, a
silver sword for fighting monsters and his steel sword for fighting "people".
He also has 6 signs, or magics at his disposal. One let-down was the
magnitude of these magics. Dont get your hopes up that your going to be
doing anything as grand as in the games trailer.

All and all, especially if your an RPG fan, Id say you should check this game
out. The games story really overshadows all the small issues and the learning curve.
Sours: https://www.gamespot.com/the-witcher-2-assassins-of-kings/user-reviews/2200-47345/

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The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings

First Released May 17, 2011

released

  • Linux
  • Macintosh
  • + 2 more
  • PC
  • Xbox 360

The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings is the sequel to developer CD Projekt's mature-themed fantasy role-playing game based on the works of author Andrzej Sapkowski.

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Content is generally suitable for ages 17 and up. May contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language.
Mature
Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Nudity, Strong Language, Strong Sexual Content, Use of Drugs

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Sours: https://www.gamespot.com/games/the-witcher-2-assassins-of-kings/


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