All 718 pokemon names

All 718 pokemon names DEFAULT

List of Pokémon

Wikipedia list article

This article is about the creatures known as "Pokémon". For the human characters in the Pokémon franchise, see List of Pokémon characters. For the characters in the anime TV series, see List of Pokémon anime characters. For the characters in the Pokémon Adventures manga series, see List of Pokémon Adventures characters.

The first 150 Pokémon as they appear in Pokémon Stadium, starting with Bulbasaurin the top left corner and ending with Mewtwoin the bottom right corner.

The Pokémon franchise revolves around 901 fictional species of collectible monsters, each having unique designs, skills, and powers. Conceived by Satoshi Tajiri in early 1989, Pokémon are creatures that inhabit the fictional Pokémon World. The designs for the multitude of species can draw inspiration from anything such as animals, plants, mythological creatures and inanimate objects. Many Pokémon are capable of evolving into more powerful species, while others can undergo form changes and achieve similar results. There are also some of them that cannot evolve. Originally, only a handful of artists led by Ken Sugimori designed Pokémon. However, by 2013 a team of 20 artists worked together to create new species designs. Sugimori and Hironobu Yoshida lead the team and determine the final designs. Each iteration of the series has brought about praise and criticism over the numerous creatures.

The vast array of creatures is commonly divided into "Generations", with each division primarily encompassing new titles in the main video game series and often a change of handheld platform. Generation I refers to Red, Green, Blue, and Yellow; Generation II refers to Gold, Silver, and Crystal; Generation III refers to Ruby, Sapphire, FireRed, LeafGreen, and Emerald; Generation IV refers to Diamond, Pearl, Platinum, HeartGold, and SoulSilver; Generation V refers to Black, White, Black 2, and White 2; Generation VI refers to X, Y, Omega Ruby, and Alpha Sapphire; Generation VII refers to Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun, Ultra Moon, Let's Go, Pikachu!, and Let's Go, Eevee!; and Generation VIII refers to Sword,Shield, Brilliant Diamond, Shining Pearl, and Legends: Arceus. Each Generation is also marked by the addition of new Pokémon: 151 in Generation I in the Kanto region, 100 in Generation II in the Johto region, 135 in Generation III in the Hoenn region, 107 in Generation IV in the Sinnoh region, 156 in Generation V in the Unova region, 72 in Generation VI in the Kalos region, 88 in Generation VII in the Alola and Kanto regions, and 92 in Generation VIII in the Galar and Hisui regions.

Due to the large number of Pokémon, listing of each species is divided into articles by generation. The 901 Pokémon are organized by their number in the National Pokédex—an in-game electronic encyclopedia that provides various information on Pokémon. The National Pokédex is subdivided into regional Pokédex series, each revolving around species introduced at the time of their respective generations along with older generations. For example, the Johto Pokédex, Generation II, covers the 100 species introduced in Gold and Silver in addition to the original 151 species. The encyclopedias follow a general ordering: starter Pokémon are listed first, followed by species obtainable early in the respective games, and are concluded with Legendary and Mythical Pokémon. Generation V is a notable exception, as Victini is the first Pokémon in the Unova Pokédex and is also uniquely numbered as number 000.

Concept[edit]

See also: Gameplay of Pokémon

The premise of Pokémon in general was conceived by Satoshi Tajiri—who later founded Game Freak—in 1989, when the Game Boy was released. The creatures that inhabit the world of Pokémon are also called Pokémon.[1] The word "Pokémon" is a romanizedcontraction of the Japanese brand Pocket Monsters (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā).[2] The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems most notably from Tajiri's childhood hobby of insect collecting. Other influences on the concept include Ultraman, anime, and playing video games in general. Throughout his early life, Tajiri saw his rural, nature-filled hometown (Machida, Tokyo) transform into an urban center. The urbanization of his town drove away wildlife and he and others living in the area were eventually unable to collect insects. Through Pokémon, Tajiri sought to bring back this outdoor pastime and share it with the world.[1] The first games in the franchise, Red and Green, were released on 27 February 1996 in Japan for the Game Boy;[3] the games saw an international release as Red and Blue in September 1998.[4] The ability to capture, battle, trade, and care for numerous creatures catapulted Pokémon to international popularity[2] and it has become a multibillion-dollar franchise and the second-best selling video game series, only behind the Mario franchise.[5]

At the start of a main series Pokémon game, the player character receives one of three "starter" Pokémon, with which they can battle and catch other Pokémon. Each Pokémon has one or two "types", such as Fire, Water, or Grass. In battle, certain types are strong against other types. For example, a fire-type attack will do more damage to a grass-type Pokémon than a water-type attack.[6] This form of gameplay is frequently compared to that of rock-paper-scissors, though players have to strategize which Pokémon and which of their attacks to use against various opponents.[7][8]

Many species of Pokémon are capable of evolving into a larger and more powerful creature. The change is accompanied by stat changes, generally a modest increase, and access to a wider variety of attacks. There are multiple ways to trigger an evolution including reaching a particular level, using a special stone, or learning a specific attack. For example, at level 16 Bulbasaur is capable of evolving into Ivysaur. Most notably, the Normal-type Eevee is capable of evolving into eight different Pokémon: Jolteon (Electric), Flareon (Fire), Vaporeon (Water), Umbreon (Dark), Espeon (Psychic), Leafeon (Grass), Glaceon (Ice), and Sylveon (Fairy). In Generation VI, a new mechanic called Mega Evolution—as well as a subset of Mega Evolution called Primal Reversion—was introduced into the game. Unlike normal evolution, Mega Evolution and Primal Reversion last only for the duration of a battle, with the Pokémon reverting to its normal form at the end. Forty-eight Pokémon are capable of undergoing Mega Evolution or Primal Reversion as of the release of Sun and Moon. In contrast, some species such as Castform, Rotom, Unown, and Lycanroc undergo form changes that may provide stat buffs or changes and type alterations but are not considered new species. Some Pokémon have differences in appearance due to gender. Pokémon can be male or female, male-only, female-only, or genderless.[9]

Though the Pokémon franchise is primarily intended for younger players, each Pokémon has various complex attributes such as natures, characteristic traits, Individual Values (IVs), and Effort Values (EVs). These, according to Game Freak Board Director Junichi Masuda, are intended for people "who enjoy battling and want to go more in depth". These individual statistics were also included because the basic concept of the franchise is to train one's Pokémon. Designer Takeshi Kawachimaru stated that IVs and EVs "help to make each Pokemon in the game individual", as it adds unique aspects to them.[10] Each Pokémon game introduces a few "Legendary" and "Mythical" Pokémon that are powerful, rare, and hard to catch.[11]Pokémon Sun and Moon introduced "Ultra Beasts", which are described as "beings from another dimension" that appeared in the Alola region and are similarly powerful and rare.[12]

Design and development[edit]

The evolution mechanic is most prominently displayed through Eevee(center)and its eight evolutions. Each one requires a different method to evolve and prominently represent the new type they don.[13]

Throughout development of Red and Green, all Pokémon were designed by Ken Sugimori, a long-time friend of Tajiri, and a team of fewer than ten people,[14] including Atsuko Nishida who is credited as the designer of Pikachu.[15][16] By 2013 a team of 20 artists worked together to create new species designs. A committee of five people determine which designs are incorporated into the games, with Sugimori and Hironobu Yoshida finalizing the look of each creature.[14][17] Furthermore, Sugimori is responsible for the boxart legendary Pokémon and all of the official artwork for the games.[14][18] According to Yoshida, the number of rejected Pokémon designs is five to ten times more than the number that are finalized in each game.[17] In rare cases, rejected designs are brought back and released in a later generation.[19] Shigeru Ohmori, director of Sun and Moon, admitted that creating new Pokémon has become a difficult task with the sheer number of creatures designed over the franchise's 20-year history.[20] Each iteration of the series has brought about praise and criticism over the numerous creatures.[21]

The designs for Pokémon are often highly analogous to real-life creatures, but also encompass inanimate objects.[21] Director Junichi Masuda and graphic designer Takao Unno have stated that inspiration for Pokémon designs can come from anything. The variety of animals and culture across the world provide the basis for countless ideas to be incorporated into the franchise.[22] The environment a Pokémon would live in is taken into account when they are designed.[23] The lei-like Comfey fits appropriately in the Hawaii-inspired Alola region of Sun and Moon.[20] Masuda has stated that each element of a design has a functioning reason.[23] In some cases, the design team creates a footprint that a Pokémon could make and designs a creature around that.[24] Some designers look to game mechanics for inspiration, seeing where particular typing combinations could be interesting.[20] Typing assignment varies during the design process, sometimes a Pokémon receives a type after it is created and other times they are designed around a particular type.[25] Each Pokémon has a specific height and weight.[26]

The simpler roots of designs in Generation I prompted greater complexity in later games.[21] Designs, in general, have become increasingly complex and thematic in newer games.[18]Sneasel, for example, draws inspiration from the Japanese yōkaikamaitachi, mythical creatures with fast, razor-sharp claws that hunt in packs. These elements are all found in Sneasel's design and characteristics.[27] New Pokémon introduced in Generation VI, for example, are heavily influenced by the culture and fauna of Europe (namely France).[18] However, by the release of X and Y in 2013, Sugimori stated he wishes for Pokémon design to return to the simpler roots of the franchise.[28]

Masuda considers the starter Pokémon to be among the most important in the franchise; Yoshida goes further and calls them "the face of that generation" and says that "they're the ones that should be on the packaging".[17] The three starter Pokémon of each generation are always Grass-, Water-, and Fire-types, a trio that Masuda considers to be the easiest to understand for new players.[25] Their designs are based on recognizable animals and made to stand out from pre-existing Pokémon. Furthermore, each are given distinct personalities to further define them.[29] In an interview with GamesRadar in 2009, Masuda stated that simple Pokémon take around six months to design and develop, whereas Pokémon that play a more important part in the games (such as starter Pokémon) may take over a year. Masuda added, "We also want the designer to have as much freedom as possible, we don't want to narrow down their imagination by saying 'We want this kind of Pokemon.' When we talk to the designer we always stress that they shouldn't think of Pokemon necessarily, but should instead just be as creative as they can." After the Pokémon is designed it is sent to the "Battle Producer", who decides which moves and stats the Pokémon should have.[10]

Lists of Pokémon[edit]

Generation Years Main titles RemakesPlatforms Number of Pokémon
New in games New in generation Total
Generation I1996–1999 Red, Green, Blue and YellowNone Game Boy,
Nintendo 3DS[a]
151
Generation II1999–2002 Gold, Silver, and CrystalNone Game Boy Color, Nintendo 3DS[a]100 251
Generation III2002–2006 Ruby, Sapphire, and EmeraldFireRed and LeafGreenGame Boy Advance135 386
Generation IV2006–2010 Diamond, Pearl, and PlatinumHeartGold and SoulSilverNintendo DS107 493
Generation V2010–2013 Black, White, Black 2, and White 2None 156 649
Generation VI2013–2016 X and YOmega Ruby and Alpha SapphireNintendo 3DS 72 721
Generation VII2016–2019 Sun and Moon81 88 809
Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon5
Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!Nintendo Switch2[b]
Generation VIII2019–present Sword and ShieldBrilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl81 92 901
The Isle of Armor and The Crown Tundra expansions 8
Legends: Arceus3

List of species[edit]

Key
Color / symbol Meaning Description
daggerStarter Pokémon The first Pokémon a player is able to obtain in the main series games
~ Fossil Pokémon[31]Ancient Pokémon only obtained by resurrecting fossils, and their evolutions
Baby Pokémon[32]Infant Pokémon primarily obtained by breeding their evolved forms
double-daggerLegendary Pokémon Powerful Pokémon associated with the legends and lore of the Pokémon world
Mythical Pokémon Pokémon only obtainable through distribution events
Ultra Beast Pokémon from another dimension

Glitch species[edit]

In the Game Boy Pokémon games, Pokémon Red, Green, Blue, and Yellow, players were able to access a set of 105 glitch Pokémon. These species were not designed by the games' designers, but could be encountered in a small area of the game. Among these species is a glitch dubbed MissingNo., which became highly notorious.[34]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ abThe Generation I and II main series games were later re-released via the Nintendo 3DS eShop in 2016–2018, with the Generation I titles being in celebration of the franchise's 20th anniversary.
  2. ^Two new Pokémon, Meltan and Melmetal, were introduced in a 2018 update to the spin-off mobile gamePokémon Go. Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee! include Meltan and Melmetal as playable Pokémon only through being transferred over from Pokémon Go.[30]
  3. ^Pikachu is the only starter Pokémon in Pokémon Yellow and its remake Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu!.
  4. ^Eevee is the starter Pokémon in the Pokémon Yellow remake Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee!, as it was only available for the rival in the original game.
  5. ^Although Deoxys is a Mythical Pokémon, it is available in-game during the Delta Episode of Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire.

References[edit]

  1. ^ abTajiri, Satoshi (22 November 1999). "The Ultimate Game Freak". Time (Interview). Interviewed by Time magazine. New York, New York. Archived from the original on 1 February 2016. Retrieved 11 February 2016.
  2. ^ abKing, Sharon R. (26 April 1999). "Mania for 'Pocket Monsters' Yields Billions for Nintendo". The New York Times. Langhorne, Pennsylvania. Archived from the original on 24 December 2016. Retrieved 11 February 2016.
  3. ^"ポケットモンスター レッド・グリーン" [Pocket Monsters Red and Green] (in Japanese). The Pokémon Company. 2017. Archived from the original on 1 July 2017. Retrieved 13 July 2017.
  4. ^"Game Boy's Pokémon Unleashed on September 28!". Redmond, Washington: Nintendo. 28 September 1998. Archived from the original on 1 May 1999. Retrieved 13 July 2017.
  5. ^Jarvis, Matthew (2 December 2014). "Margin Makers: Guide to Pokémon merchandise". MCV. Archived from the original on 27 January 2016. Retrieved 11 February 2016.
  6. ^"Type Matchup Chart"(PDF). Archived(PDF) from the original on 15 December 2017. Retrieved 7 January 2018.
  7. ^Loveridge, Sam (25 July 2016). "Pokémon Go Types explained: how to win Pokémon Go Gym battles". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on 25 December 2016.
  8. ^Julien-Rohman, Damion (24 November 2014). "'Pokémon Alpha Sapphire and Omega Ruby' deliver". The State Press. Archived from the original on 24 December 2016.
  9. ^"The new gender politics of 'Pokémon Go' are sexist as hell". Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  10. ^ abGrimm, Michael (20 March 2009). "How Pokemon are born". GamesRadar. Archived from the original on 10 March 2016.
  11. ^Martinez, Phillips (18 November 2016). "'Pokemon Sun And Moon': How To Catch Every Legendary In Alola". iDigitalTimes. Archived from the original on 24 December 2016. Retrieved 24 December 2016.
  12. ^Martinez, Phillip (18 November 2016). "'Pokémon Sun And Moon' Ultra Beasts: Everything You Need To Know". iDigitalTimes. Archived from the original on 24 December 2016. Retrieved 24 December 2016.
  13. ^Drake, Audrey (14 February 2013). "Pokémon X and Y's New Eeveelution Revealed". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved 23 June 2017.
  14. ^ abcPlunkett, Luke (24 May 2011). "The Man Who Creates Pokémon For a Living". Kotaku. Gawker Media. Archived from the original on 25 October 2015. Retrieved 19 October 2015.
  15. ^Sarkar, Samit (29 May 2013). "Harvest Moon creator's Hometown Story leads Natsume's E3 slate". Polygon. Vox Media. Retrieved 18 June 2017.
  16. ^Bailey, Kat (16 September 2015). "The New Zygarde Form is a Reminder of How Hard it is to Design a Good Pokémon". USGamer.net. Gamer Network. Retrieved 18 June 2017.
  17. ^ abcNutt, Christian (10 October 2013). "How Pokemon are born: Designing the series' iconic monsters". Gamasutra. UBM plc. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 28 January 2016.
  18. ^ abcWatts, Steve (23 October 2013). "How Europe inspired Pokemon X and Y's creature designs". Shacknews. GameFly. Archived from the original on 19 July 2016. Retrieved 18 June 2017.
  19. ^Masuda, Junichi; Yoshida, Hironobu (24 September 2013). "Pokémon X and Y Interview with Game Freak" (Interview). Interviewed by Justin Berube and Josh Max. Nintendo World Report. Archived from the original on 26 January 2016. Retrieved 30 January 2016.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Pok%C3%A9mon
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http://www.collegehumor.com/video/6935996/updated-pokerap-with-all-718-pokemon

So they are missing 3 of them.

mudkip72 posted...

So they are missing 3 of them.


Complete as of now.

The only good Pokerap was the first one, and only because it's so cheesy and terrible.

They should make a full-dex version of Polkamon.

3DS friend code: 5386-7979-9957

FuneralCake posted...
The only good Pokerap was the first one, and only because it's so cheesy and terrible.


Going back and listening to it after all these years... brings a tear to my eye...

A manly tear, of course.

Cecil is a man with honor. ~ AncientPancakes
If we were made of cellophane, we'd all get stinking drunk quite faster

The way they pronounced pokemon like chimecho and lucario makes me wanna kill myself. bye

3DS FC: 0559-7940-5536 Name/IGN: Steven
AC Dream Address: 4A00-0038-8E06. FE My Castle Address: 09069-70355-27497-27205

calender68 posted...
The way they pronounced pokemon like chimecho and lucario makes me wanna kill myself. bye


Try to do that yourself. You won't even get past the voice recordings, or the editing, of the first five Pokemon.

Switch FC: SW-2774-1787-6198 // PSN: MrLoneWanderer
"The two most important days in life are the day you are born and the day you find out why."

tutti posted...

They should make a full-dex version of Polkamon.


This would be perfect.

Sours: https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/boards/696959-pokemon-x/67757874
Max StatsTrainer Level/Power UpsMax Hit PointsMax Combat Points1
2 Power Ups 13 - 14 28 - 33Up to start of Level 2
4 Power Ups 23 - 26 89 - 105Up to start of Level 3
6 Power Ups 31 - 34 150 - 177Up to start of Level 4
8 Power Ups 36 - 40 211 - 248Up to start of Level 5
10 Power Ups 41 - 46 272 - 320Up to start of Level 6
12 Power Ups 46 - 51 333 - 392Up to start of Level 7
14 Power Ups 50 - 55 394 - 463Up to start of Level 8
16 Power Ups 54 - 59 455 - 535Up to start of Level 9
18 Power Ups 57 - 63 516 - 607Up to start of Level 10
20 Power Ups 60 - 67 577 - 678Up to start of Level 11
22 Power Ups 63 - 70 635 - 746Up to start of Level 12
24 Power Ups 66 - 73 693 - 814Up to start of Level 13
26 Power Ups 69 - 76 750 - 882Up to start of Level 14
28 Power Ups 71 - 79 808 - 950Up to start of Level 15
30 Power Ups 74 - 82 866 - 1018Up to start of Level 16
32 Power Ups 76 - 84 923 - 1086Up to start of Level 17
34 Power Ups 79 - 87 981 - 1153Up to start of Level 18
36 Power Ups 81 - 90 1039 - 1221Up to start of Level 19
38 Power Ups 83 - 92 1097 - 1289Up to start of Level 20
40 Power Ups 86 - 94 1154 - 1357Up to start of Level 21
42 Power Ups 88 - 97 1212 - 1425Up to start of Level 22
44 Power Ups 90 - 99 1270 - 1493Up to start of Level 23
46 Power Ups 92 - 101 1328 - 1561Up to start of Level 24
48 Power Ups 94 - 104 1385 - 1629Up to start of Level 25
50 Power Ups 96 - 106 1443 - 1696Up to start of Level 26
52 Power Ups 98 - 108 1501 - 1764Up to start of Level 27
54 Power Ups 99 - 110 1559 - 1832Up to start of Level 28
56 Power Ups 101 - 112 1616 - 1900Up to start of Level 29
58 Power Ups 103 - 114 1674 - 1968Up to start of Level 30
60 Power Ups 105 - 116 1732 - 2036Up to start of Level 31
62 Power Ups 106 - 117 1761 - 2070Up to start of Level 32
64 Power Ups 107 - 118 1790 - 2104Up to start of Level 33
66 Power Ups 107 - 119 1818 - 2138Up to start of Level 34
68 Power Ups 108 - 120 1847 - 2172Up to start of Level 35
70 Power Ups 109 - 121 1876 - 2206Up to start of Level 36
72 Power Ups 110 - 122 1905 - 2239Up to start of Level 37
74 Power Ups 111 - 122 1934 - 2273Up to start of Level 38
76 Power Ups 112 - 123 1963 - 2307Up to start of Level 39
78 Power Ups 112 - 124 1992 - 2341Up to start of Level 40
80 Power Ups 113 - 125 2020 - 2375Up to start of Level 41
82 Power Ups 114 - 126 2046 - 2405Up to start of Level 42
84 Power Ups 115 - 127 2072 - 2436Up to start of Level 43
86 Power Ups 115 - 128 2098 - 2466Up to start of Level 44
88 Power Ups 116 - 128 2124 - 2497Up to start of Level 45
90 Power Ups 117 - 129 2150 - 2528Up to start of Level 46
92 Power Ups 118 - 130 2177 - 2559Up to start of Level 47
94 Power Ups 118 - 131 2203 - 2590Up to start of Level 48
96 Power Ups 119 - 132 2230 - 2622Up to start of Level 49
98 Power Ups 120 - 132 2257 - 2653Up to start of Level 50
100 Power Ups 121 - 133 2284 - 2685Level 51
(Buddy Boost) 121 - 134 2311 - 2717
Max StatsTrainer Level/Power UpsMax Hit PointsMax Combat Points1
2 Power Ups 22 - 23 42 - 48Up to start of Level 2
4 Power Ups 39 - 42 132 - 151Up to start of Level 3
6 Power Ups 51 - 54 222 - 254Up to start of Level 4
8 Power Ups 61 - 64 312 - 357Up to start of Level 5
10 Power Ups 69 - 73 402 - 460Up to start of Level 6
12 Power Ups 76 - 81 492 - 562Up to start of Level 7
14 Power Ups 83 - 88 582 - 665Up to start of Level 8
16 Power Ups 89 - 95 673 - 768Up to start of Level 9
18 Power Ups 95 - 101 763 - 871Up to start of Level 10
20 Power Ups 100 - 107 853 - 974Up to start of Level 11
22 Power Ups 105 - 112 938 - 1072Up to start of Level 12
24 Power Ups 110 - 117 1023 - 1169Up to start of Level 13
26 Power Ups 115 - 122 1109 - 1266Up to start of Level 14
28 Power Ups 119 - 126 1194 - 1364Up to start of Level 15
30 Power Ups 123 - 131 1279 - 1461Up to start of Level 16
32 Power Ups 127 - 135 1364 - 1559Up to start of Level 17
34 Power Ups 131 - 139 1450 - 1656Up to start of Level 18
36 Power Ups 135 - 143 1535 - 1753Up to start of Level 19
38 Power Ups 139 - 147 1620 - 1851Up to start of Level 20
40 Power Ups 142 - 151 1705 - 1948Up to start of Level 21
42 Power Ups 146 - 155 1791 - 2046Up to start of Level 22
44 Power Ups 149 - 159 1876 - 2143Up to start of Level 23
46 Power Ups 153 - 162 1961 - 2241Up to start of Level 24
48 Power Ups 156 - 166 2047 - 2338Up to start of Level 25
50 Power Ups 159 - 169 2132 - 2436Up to start of Level 26
52 Power Ups 162 - 173 2217 - 2533Up to start of Level 27
54 Power Ups 165 - 176 2303 - 2630Up to start of Level 28
56 Power Ups 168 - 179 2388 - 2728Up to start of Level 29
58 Power Ups 171 - 182 2473 - 2825Up to start of Level 30
60 Power Ups 174 - 185 2559 - 2923Up to start of Level 31
62 Power Ups 176 - 187 2601 - 2972Up to start of Level 32
64 Power Ups 177 - 188 2644 - 3020Up to start of Level 33
66 Power Ups 179 - 190 2687 - 3069Up to start of Level 34
68 Power Ups 180 - 191 2729 - 3118Up to start of Level 35
70 Power Ups 182 - 193 2772 - 3166Up to start of Level 36
72 Power Ups 183 - 194 2815 - 3215Up to start of Level 37
74 Power Ups 184 - 196 2857 - 3264Up to start of Level 38
76 Power Ups 186 - 197 2900 - 3313Up to start of Level 39
78 Power Ups 187 - 199 2942 - 3361Up to start of Level 40
80 Power Ups 188 - 200 2985 - 3410Up to start of Level 41
82 Power Ups 190 - 202 3023 - 3453Up to start of Level 42
84 Power Ups 191 - 203 3061 - 3497Up to start of Level 43
86 Power Ups 192 - 204 3099 - 3541Up to start of Level 44
88 Power Ups 193 - 205 3138 - 3585Up to start of Level 45
90 Power Ups 194 - 207 3177 - 3629Up to start of Level 46
92 Power Ups 196 - 208 3216 - 3674Up to start of Level 47
94 Power Ups 197 - 209 3255 - 3719Up to start of Level 48
96 Power Ups 198 - 210 3295 - 3764Up to start of Level 49
98 Power Ups 199 - 212 3335 - 3809Up to start of Level 50
100 Power Ups 200 - 213 3375 - 3855Level 51
(Buddy Boost) 202 - 214 3415 - 3901
Max StatsTrainer Level/Power UpsMax Hit PointsMax Combat Points1
2 Power Ups 40 - 41 55 - 62Up to start of Level 2
4 Power Ups 71 - 73 174 - 196Up to start of Level 3
6 Power Ups 92 - 95 293 - 330Up to start of Level 4
8 Power Ups 109 - 113 411 - 464Up to start of Level 5
10 Power Ups 124 - 128 530 - 598Up to start of Level 6
12 Power Ups 137 - 142 649 - 732Up to start of Level 7
14 Power Ups 149 - 154 767 - 866Up to start of Level 8
16 Power Ups 160 - 166 886 - 1000Up to start of Level 9
18 Power Ups 171 - 177 1005 - 1134Up to start of Level 10
20 Power Ups 180 - 187 1123 - 1268Up to start of Level 11
22 Power Ups 189 - 196 1236 - 1395Up to start of Level 12
24 Power Ups 198 - 205 1348 - 1521Up to start of Level 13
26 Power Ups 206 - 213 1460 - 1648Up to start of Level 14
28 Power Ups 213 - 221 1573 - 1775Up to start of Level 15
30 Power Ups 221 - 229 1685 - 1902Up to start of Level 16
32 Power Ups 228 - 236 1797 - 2028Up to start of Level 17
34 Power Ups 235 - 244 1910 - 2155Up to start of Level 18
36 Power Ups 242 - 251 2022 - 2282Up to start of Level 19
38 Power Ups 249 - 257 2134 - 2408Up to start of Level 20
40 Power Ups 255 - 264 2247 - 2535Up to start of Level 21
42 Power Ups 262 - 271 2359 - 2662Up to start of Level 22
44 Power Ups 268 - 277 2471 - 2789Up to start of Level 23
46 Power Ups 274 - 283 2584 - 2916Up to start of Level 24
48 Power Ups 280 - 289 2696 - 3043Up to start of Level 25
50 Power Ups 285 - 295 2809 - 3169Up to start of Level 26
52 Power Ups 291 - 301 2921 - 3296Up to start of Level 27
54 Power Ups 297 - 307 3033 - 3423Up to start of Level 28
56 Power Ups 302 - 313 3146 - 3550Up to start of Level 29
58 Power Ups 307 - 318 3258 - 3677Up to start of Level 30
60 Power Ups 313 - 324 3370 - 3803Up to start of Level 31
62 Power Ups 315 - 326 3427 - 3867Up to start of Level 32
64 Power Ups 318 - 329 3483 - 3930Up to start of Level 33
66 Power Ups 320 - 332 3539 - 3994Up to start of Level 34
68 Power Ups 323 - 334 3595 - 4057Up to start of Level 35
70 Power Ups 325 - 337 3651 - 4120Up to start of Level 36
72 Power Ups 328 - 339 3707 - 4184Up to start of Level 37
74 Power Ups 330 - 342 3764 - 4247Up to start of Level 38
76 Power Ups 333 - 345 3820 - 4310Up to start of Level 39
78 Power Ups 335 - 347 3876 - 4374Up to start of Level 40
80 Power Ups 338 - 350 3932 - 4437Up to start of Level 41
82 Power Ups 340 - 352 3982 - 4493Up to start of Level 42
84 Power Ups 342 - 354 4032 - 4550Up to start of Level 43
86 Power Ups 344 - 356 4083 - 4607Up to start of Level 44
88 Power Ups 346 - 358 4134 - 4665Up to start of Level 45
90 Power Ups 348 - 361 4185 - 4722Up to start of Level 46
92 Power Ups 351 - 363 4236 - 4780Up to start of Level 47
94 Power Ups 353 - 365 4288 - 4839Up to start of Level 48
96 Power Ups 355 - 367 4340 - 4898Up to start of Level 49
98 Power Ups 357 - 370 4393 - 4957Up to start of Level 50
100 Power Ups 359 - 372 4445 - 5016Level 51
(Buddy Boost) 361 - 374 4498 - 5076
Sours: https://www.serebii.net/pokemongo/pokemon/718.shtml

Pokemon all names 718

I prepared for the shooting and began to wait for the main character, but I did not have to wait long. The door to the bathroom opened and Oksana entered, as usual, in her white robe. I pressed the REC button and the recording started. Oksana untied the belt on her dressing gown and asked him from her shoulders under her feet.

She had no underwear under her robe, and she appeared completely naked in front of the camera lens.

Updated Ponyrap (With all 718 Pokemon)

There, in a secret room deep under the Displacer of Temporal Timelines, Verta, Aleksei's girlfriend, a beautiful woman, red-haired and fair-skinned, a. Gamer and a joker. She was waiting for those who accompanied and escorted Skynet along with Alexei to the rescue.

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Have a drink. - I dont know. I dont drink. Oh, come on.



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