Robot generator sonic cd

Robot generator sonic cd DEFAULT

Nightmare Fuel / Sonic the Hedgehog CD

The Japanese Bad Future version of Metallic Madness deserves merit: not only does it have lyrics, and not only are those lyrics distorted and robotic, but it sounds as though Eggman (or somebody else) is taunting you, the player. The worst part is that it's right. If you're seeing the Bad Future stages of Metallic Madness Zone, then you have (thus far) failed to collect the seven Time Stones or missed at least one Robot Generator. If it's Zone 3 and it's Bad Future, then the Little Planet is doomed to remain under Robotnik's control.

YOU CAN'T DO ANYTHING, SO DON'T EVEN TRY IT. GET SOME HELP.
DON'T DO WHAT SONIC DOES.
(Ge-g-g-g-get outta' here!)

SONIC, DEAD OR ALIVE, IS M-M-MINE.

Sours: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/NightmareFuel/SonicTheHedgehogCD

Why Sonic CD Isn't a bad game (Rant/Review)

DistantDylan's avatar

Published:

gamereviewsonic_cdamy_roseamyrosemetalsonicrantreviewreviewssonic_the_hedgehogsoniccdsonicthehedgehogvideogamevideogamesamyrosesegareviewsandthoughts

(Credit to Naoto Oshima for the art!)


Why Sonic CD is NOT a bad game:

For some reason, a lot of hate seems to be growing on Sonic CD, despite it being highly praised initially by fans, critics, and a lot of people loved it. Magazines such as
Electronic Gaming Monthly's March issue stating it to be one of the best games in the franchise, as a lot of love was given to it by fans and even received a %
by some critics in the original version, which at the time was the HIGHEST rating for sonic games, even higher than the other ones. Honestly I'd say although this is not
the BEST SONIC GAME EVER as a lot of people used to say, and a big portion of the fanbase said it was..

It was still a REALLY GOOD game. (I honestly like Sonic 3 & Knuckles best)
It seems this is an ongoing trend in my opinion; hating on games that were well received by critics and fans alike. In the early 's the Adventure games were being crapped on
as well, and that was mainly due to youtubers opinions and people blindly following them and agreeing with some not playing the games in the first place, and turns these into a toxic
movement.

(NOTE: To those who actually don't like sonic adventure 1 or 2, or sonic CD or other games that seem to be highly praised that is good it's your opinion, i just don't really
agree when people don't try it out themselves or go into the game with someone elses opinion in mind and don't give the game a chance, keeping in mind what other people said and having
that set mindset or dont play it at all) And being overrated as I've seen people say with SA1 and SA2, colors, and even mania, and CD nowadays doesn't necessarily make a game bad

<Insert picture of the cover art of JP version>
<The Soundtrack:>
The soundtrack fits the levels perfectly, both the JP/EU and USA soundtracks have their own good tracks, a lot of them manage to fit the levels. Tidal Tempest, Palmtree panic,
Stardust Speedway all manage to sound amazing in both versions and fit the levels well. This game has some of the best quality when it comes to how the songs sound of the classic
series games, around on par i'd say with Sonic 3 & Knuckles.

<The Level Design:>
The level design seems to suddenly of been being criticized starting with a couple youtubers saying they hated Sonic CD, with a section of the fanbase shifting their opinions
immediately after the videos were released, however the level designs are NOT bad at all.

I can name multiple levels that have a good design, palmtree panic has a bunch of
speed sections to where you can go fast (if you wanted to), tons to explore and honestly just because the game requires exploring to find past and future signs to time travel does
NOT make it a bad game by any means, in all honesty.

I literally do not see anyone complaining about backtracking and exploration required to find sign posts to get the chaos emeralds in Sonic 2,
yet people say this is a poor choice for the levels in sonic CD.

Stardust speedway is also a really good level design, obstacles here and there with robots and speed sections, to requiring the
player to not just simply hold right but to learn the layout and use cannons to get to certain parts to reach the end (like the mini maze in zone 2), Tidal tempest is also
surprisingly good when it comes to level design as well as obstacles that can kill you and pose a threat whether it be spikes, the dragon totem things that shoot blue fire that
pushes you down which in certain scenarios can lead to getting crushed if not timed right (like the sections with the boxes i mean) which leads to a challenge, levels are seemingly nowadays being
criticized as being "too easy, with no bottomless pits" just because a level doesnt have bottomless pits doesn't make it easy, there are crushers, spikes, spike pits, a decent
amount of enemies in each level.
And speedy areas, the goal posts at the end is basically telling the game "Im done with this stage", you have to time travel to create a good future
requiring the player to put effort into doing so, exploring for the robot generator, to enter these you have to maintain sonics speed after hitting a sign post, this multi step
process of travelling to the past, finding the robot generator, and exiting takes advantage of the games level design which forces the player to interact with elements.

The first step requires an understanding and skillful execution of the games mechanics.
Reaching the necessary speed is the hard part which poses a challenge, having
to scout out the level for areas that give well to fluid movement, some are easy like two springs facing each other, others requiring you to search and
do an obstacle course (disproving claims levels are too easy with no effort required to beat, unless you decide to skip everything and just stay in the present,
holding right and jumping a few times)
and avoiding obstacles like other sonic games.

The stages were designed cleverly to both have a little challenge if you're trying to play it like how one would play sonic 1, while having maximum use and effect with a little
challenge if you play it the way its meant to be played (time travelling) as you can see through how the stage loops together. tons of spring based platforming, loop-de-loop
upon loop-deloop, messing with conveyor belts, and levels that take a couple minutes to reach the goal if played by putting effort in, make you learn the intricacies of
the individual stage to the point you'll even learn the maps by the end of the game! if you play it just simply as you would the other classic games it isn't much a super
fun way to play, youre running past genius level concepts, loop-de-loops, obstacles, and never take the time to breathe in any of it.

Sure the game doesn't really tell you the best way to play it, but you can get hints by finding the past and future signposts or reading the manual. Though I will say
levels such as Collision Chaos, Wacky Workbench, and Metallic madness are horribly done. Metallic madness gets repetetive in each zone, and extends too long especially in
the second zone. The enemies are a bit of a joke, Wacky Workbench is a good concept but is executed poorly with the bounce mechanic being very annoying and over the top.
And Collision Chaos has a hard boss fight somewhat on your first few attempts, although not in the good way it's just annoying.

<Level variations:>
The variation in levels and zones are done VERY well. Unlike a truly bad game as say, Knuckles Chaotix, this game changes up the layouts of the map, object locations, platforming,
and badniks in each zone.

Some zones it can be easy to time travel, while others being hard to do so requiring the player to put effort into beating the game with the good ending, you are the one in charge
of the future of THE PLANET. Each zone has different variations in the Past, and Good Future, and Bad Future. How you play in the past affects the future either resulting in a toxic
environment, more obstacles sometimes than i nthe past or present when you get a bad future, and the Good Future having beautiful colors, and a lot of detail and care is
put into each zone. They are very fun to play in, with tons to interact with when you put in the effort to time travel.

<The impact the game has had:>

Sonic CD's had a MASSIVE impact on the sonic franchise as a whole. Level designs like Stardust Speedway return to tons of games in the future, such as
Sonic Generations for example, and Sonic Mania. The music style which was heavily influenced by New Jack Swing genre (in the JP/EU ost anyway) lead
to some of the songs in Sonic 3 such as Hydrocity Zone and Marble Garden zone (These ones weren't done by Michael Jackson but the influence is kind of
obvious)

Not only that, but the opening and ending animations done by Toei Studios are really well done and influenced things in the Sonic series' cartoons and
games such as the Sonic OVA from which is heavily influenced by the style of Sonic CD's opening and endings, and Sonic Mania which was an amazing game
was heavily inspired by Sonic CD with stardust speedway even returning. The opening to it is done by Tyson hesse, who was inpired by Sonic CD's end credits
and opening sequence (the two styles look similar).

Without Sonic CD, we wouldn't even have Christian Whitehead's works such as the Sonic 2 and 1 remakes for IOS and android, or Sonic Mania! Christian Whitehead's
first project for Sega was actually the Sonic CD remake, which fixed a TON of c ollision issues, glitches and more. Sonic CD was the one game Sega felt needed
a remaster, before Christian Whitehead the game was almost entirely inaccessable, except through emulators for the most part or Sonic Gems Collection. Christian is the one
who brought the game to the forefront! Many people didn't get the chance to play until then, mainly due to the failure of the Sega CD.

<Criticisms:>
<Boss Battles:>

The boss fights in Sonic CD in all honesty however are a huge issue. The first zones boss (Palmtree Panic) is so easy to the point it's a joke for the most part.
All you need to do is jump into Robotnik when he holds still after barely stepping towards you, and doing no attacks. Collision Chaos' provides a tiny bit of a challenge
but is very annoying and poorly executed. Wacky Workbenches and even the FINAL BOSS don't require much effort to beat either, with almost no danger. In fact, the danger in
the final boss mainly comes to Metallic Madness zone 3 having the only bottomless pit in the game.

The only truly challenging boss fight in my opinion is the Metal Sonic race in Stardust Speedway. Metal Sonic's moveset rivals sonics and he can blast into you, making you
fall behind and sometimes hit Robotnik's laser beam and having an instant death, he can electrocute you if you're behind him, and his speed can rival Sonic's easily.
This boss fight takes a few attempts usually, and the spikes can stop you dead in your tracks leaving you vulnerable.

<Special Stages:>

Okay, I dare say Sonic CD's special stages are worse than Sonic 2's even. It takes forever to turn, and Sonic's controls being wonky and hard to understand.
The water takes away too much time from your timer, and the UFO's paths are too hard to predict most of the time leading to you screwing yourself over. The distracting
background doesn't help matters and the flashing colors can really distract you.

This game is very unforgiving when it comes to the special stages, when you lose enough time a UFO with extra time appears but even that one is hard to hit and feels like
a tease at times. They move slower but are easy to miss in certain special stage layouts like the 5th special stage, or the 7th.

<The Futures:>

The Future in Sonic CD when in the present feels pretty pointless to go to, you don't really interact with much in them and they dont provide you anything like the past and present do,
you can't even destroy a robot generator in the future, and the only "point" it has in zones 1 and 2 is to see what the good future and bad futures are like. The future is also the
default zone during the boss fights, so I guess that's one purpose..?

<Conclusion:>

Overall, Sonic CD definitely isn't a bad game in all honesty, and although it isn't the best classic era game, I'd say it definitely deserves a place equal to Sonic 2, and a lot of
complaints such as the exploration focus and backtracking I don't see people
say anything about in Sonic The Hedgehog 3 & Knuckles where you have to go back and search for giant rings, or Sonic The Hedgehog 2 where you have to
search for sign posts that can be hard to find.

Other points:
-Sonic CD introduced one of the best rivals to sonic who eventually had some of the best fights (though nowadays since generations it seems to be just a repeat of the sonic CD race
and he's kinda a joke in the newer games) Metal Sonic! Who became one of the most memorable Sonic characters with cool abilities, and a good story to him (especially in sonic heroes)
-Sonic CD also introduced Rosy The Rascal/Amy Rose, who also was one of the most memorable characters

If you read the entirety of this, I'd like to know how YOU feel about Sonic CD! ^-^ Did this review change your perspective on the game? Do you like this game still? Do you hate this
game still?

Image details

Image size

xpx KB

© DistantDylan

Sours: https://www.deviantart.com/distantdylan/art/Why-Sonic-CD-Isn-t-a-bad-game-Rant-Review
  1. Brier island whale watch
  2. Hemi cudas for sale
  3. Startup kdrama watch online
From Sonic Zone: 0

Palmtree Panic:
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-pp-zone1bmap.png
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-pp-zone2bmap.png

Collision Chaos
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-cc-zone1bmap.png
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-cc-zone2bmap.png

Tidal Tempest
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-tt-zone1bmap.png
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-tt-zone2bmap.png

Quartz Quadrant
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-qq-zone1bmap.png
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-qq-zone2bmap.png

Wacky Workbench
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-ww-zone1bmap.png
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-ww-zone2bmap.png

Stardust Speedway
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-ss-zone1bmap.png
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-ss-zone2bmap.png

Metallic Madness
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-mm-zone1bmap.png
http://soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/downloads/scd-mm-zone2bmap.png

Tired of obeying the rules only for the condescending enforcers to punish the good.

Sours: https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/boards/sonic-cd/
Collision Chaos

Sonic, seemingly, experiments with drugs in his most visually bizarre, backward, psychedelic level in history. This is Sonic CD's standard bouncy/pinball stage (coming in unusually early in the game), with bumpers, flippers, springs and other typical paraphernalia, but the appearance and location of the level is just such a mixed bag of random stuff that it's almost beyond explanation and classification. Amy manages to get herself kidnapped by Metal Sonic at the beginning of the stage, and you must bounce and flip your way to the patience-challenging pinball table of a boss.

The aptly-named Collision Chaos is virtually impossible to class into any category based on appearance alone, because none of it really makes much sense at all. The Present is essentially an obscure, psychedelic world whose rather wacky, and possibly drug-induced design is made up of a variety of different visual contents. The background is set outside, and is sort of a weird, distorted version of Palmtree Panic, with tall, rocky orange mountains that are below much larger, darker and more pixellated mounds. The dusky sky is a very dark blue/purple with small magenta clouds travelling quickly across it, and below the mountains are what I can only assume to be a purple-ish river, and then basically just a load of orange and yellow circles. Your guess as to what the hell those are supposed to represent is as good as mine, but I assume it's forestry of some sort. As if that wasn't weird enough for you, you can see a little bit of similar ground upside down at the very top of the stage, which might sound totally nuts, but bear in mind that it's probably supposed to be Never Lake, back down on the home planet. This game of course takes place on the neighbouring Little Planet, yet no matter what the time zone, this upside down area always looks the same as the surrounding background.

A particularly abstract background is a particular signature of this wacky level.
Upside down landscape! Nuts!

Things don't make much more sense in the foreground, which is mostly a nice shade of pink and bits of yellow, arranged in various patterns, extrusions and intrusions in the rock, plus a touch of greenery here and there, and along the surfaces of straight paths. Also on the paths you'll find many tall, light blue metallic structures reaching up, in various designs, and blue girders sticking out the sides of walls. Internal sections feature large holes in the dark back walls and flashing diamond patterns, and not forgetting the huge black decorative panels in the air above the ground, featuring flashing neon words in a kind of Japanese-like writing (though I'm pretty sure it's just gibberish). Along the bottom of the stage is a pretty nifty flowing river, with reflections of the ground above.

The Past is decorated up nicely with golden pillars and pre-historic plants.
The background here is slightly less abstract. Also spot the occasional girder, being the only modern presence here.

Thankfully, this insane place never used to be like this. The Past becomes much more normal, and like the Past of the first stage, this is more of a rocky pre-historic jungle, where the sun is setting, creating an orange sky. The horizon presents a mix of dark mounds of forestry and tall, thin rocky structures set at different heights, with grass and trees on top, which resemble parts of playable ground. The calm water below it reflects the orange glow and leaves of a closer forest area line the bottom of the background. The pink foreground rock is replaced with a gold one, still with grass in some places, and various pre-historic trees and plants take the place of the tall light blue structures in the Present. Likewise, where there will one day be large inexplicable neon signs in the air, there are, for the moment, collections of floating brown rocks with grass platforms on top that you can actually stand on now. Despite being relatively undisturbed, there are also occasional pink girders sticking out of ceilings and walls.

A particularly utopian feel to the Good Future. Featuring a glistenning lake and colourful scenery.
Every time zone has inner regions too, the background intruding slightly through holes in the walls. Also take a moment to see the lovely reflective water flowing by in the foreground at the bottom of most time zones.

While the Present and Past were set in the evening, the Good Future rolls on to a bright blue sky in the middle of the day, and everything, while still a little bit wacky, seems pretty peaceful now, with a kind of utopian flavour to it. The hilly mounds in the distance are a dark green colour, and in front of them, a mix of bright orange rocky mountains and shiny light blue futuristic towers and buildings. The fresh water glistens beneath, and the forest at the bottom of the background remains as a vague collection of green circles. The foreground is now a pale green colour, mixing nicely with the blues to create a pleasant, calming sort of place, and the futuristic decorative plants adorning the grassy paths help too. The weird Japanese-like neon signs are still here in much the same form, but with the obvious Good Future visual differences such as green structures and plants surrounding them.

The Bad Future here represents Sonic CD's amazing ability to represent a dark and polluted world, yet still retain a certain level of colour and vibrancy that's rare in games.
Pinball areas are often decorated by abstract patterns and flashing neon signs with elaborate symbols on them.

As you'd imagine, the Bad Future is a rather darker affair, yet still colourful. The sky is a very dark grey colour, with red clouds drifting past, and equally red pixellated mountains on the horizon. Dull brown tall pointed rocks stand between green towers and power stations, and the river and forest below it have disappeared, to be replaced by orange pipes stretching across. The flowing water in the foreground at the very bottom of the level, if it still is water, is now a purple and fiery orange colour, and the patterned ground is dirty, metallic grey with orange grass on the surface. Any remaining plants have all been chewed up by Eggman's piping systems and small green and orange towers, predictably flashing away. The obscure neon signs have gotten a bit more complicated in their text, and surrounded by decoration that glows several different colours, but largely remains red and black.

Collision Chaos features a very open structure in places, with large wide areas for Sonic to bounce around between springs, bumpers and flippers in the air, which is typical of this type of level. There are also narrow corridors - usually fairly long ones at the bottom of the zones and in most cases, paths are either perfectly straight (and sometimes quite long) or they become curved pits and walls. Numerous winding passages in the foreground will separate the areas as they progress you to the next ones, although you can often spin back through these tunnels afterwards without too much difficulty. There are quite a few different types of interesting structures to encounter, such as a series of very long pits, each with curved ground at the bottom and numerous platforms and holes in their walls along the way down, creating multiple routes across the top, middles or bottoms. Other long pits contain no gaps through their walls and consist of a series of flippers, platforms or bumpers all the way down. You can make your way up small steps in very enclosed, vertical passages, and when breaking out at the top, you'll tumble down a very steep slope. Hidden entrances in some walls from the outside can also lead in to these small internal sections. Most annoying is where you have to try and get through huge open areas by bouncing between bumpers and springs to try and get where you want to go, which isn't always easy.

Winding tunnels to spin through are a common feature, separating areas neatly from each other.
Internal passageways occur alongside the larger, open areas. This design of small ledges leading upwards, often through a large spire that Sonic can roll down the side of at the top, is particularly common.
Curves add lots of speed - either a curve up a single wall or a bowl-shaped bottom of a long, wide hole. Great for time travel.
Larger, open areas are particularly pinball-themed. Flippers, bumpers and springs are all featured here and often in challenging formations that continually throw you backwards while you're trying to get through.

Multiple routes quite often depend on how high you can get up across the large, open bouncing sections or by hitting curves with speed from the winding tunnels to send yourself flying into the air, but upper routes are rarely stable, and it's difficult to remain on only one vertical plain as you progress through the stage. There are typically two or sometimes three paths on the go at once, and you can change between them only in certain, open places. Differences across the time zones often relate to the winding tunnels, precise locations of tall walls and steps, or internal passages, and bouncy objects and walls may make backtracking across the zones a little difficult, although much of it is still possible. Zone 2 is one of only two stages in the Sonic world that have two different exits, as illustrated in Point #4.

No true pinball level is complete without them. Press a jump button while standing on top to flip. More effective if standing nearer the edge.
Moving bar bumpers. You'll bounce off of them repeatedly, but you can still use them as platforms for reaching above.
Triangular bumper.
Thin bumper bars are found on walls or in this formation on paths. This actually provides an unlikely, though precarious time travel opportunity, as bouncing between them can get fierce.

The typical assortment of bouncy pinball objects offer up the most notable features of Collision Chaos. Bumpers include the common red and white, starred circular ones in the air, which will each dispense points every time you bounce off of them for the first five bounces. They can sometimes be found moving in various patterns in open, pinball areas. Other bumpers, not available in the Past, can be found in triangular form, or either horizontal or vertical long bars, two of which are often placed opposite each other, a small gap apart for you to bounce between them. Also in the large pinball areas in all time zones, you'll find slightly bigger horizontal bars that will move either side to side or up and down, and can sometimes be used as transportation platforms in this way. None of these other bumpers produce points. When you land on a grey flipper facing either the left or right, press a jump button to make it flip up, and send you spinning upwards, with the height depending on how far along towards the tip of the flipper you're standing. In the air amongst the black neon signs in the Present or Bad Future, there's an occasional glowing entrance hole that will award you points if you land in it, and squeeze you back out a few seconds later. There are small, circular bumpers nearby that you can get minimal bounces from, and if you land in the hole, your momentum will be maintained while it's holding you, so you can use these to time travel.

Standard bumpers. You must know the deal with these by now! They bounce you off of and between each other, each awarding points for the first five bounces only.
Aim for the yellow slot with an arrow on it. You'll be awared points before being spat out again, and staying in actually maintains your time travel warp too. The small red spheres are mini bumpers.
Standard platforms that move up/down, left/right, or remain stationary, or possibly will only move in a certain direction once you step on. Their movements are a little on the jerky side.

There are grey, man-made platforms that will either remain stationary or move left/right or up/down, and small gun turrets of sorts found on platforming ledges, will pop up every once in a while and shoot two small projectiles from left and right cannons, and then go back down again. The top will begin flashing when it's about to pop open and if Sonic is standing on it, he'll spring upwards a little way when it does. In the Past and Good Future, they pop up, but they don't fire any projectiles. As you run along straight paths and slopes, pop-up horizontal springs will appear out of the ground behind you, connected to grey blocks, and are important for getting up high curved walls, but beware as there are usually similar pop-up horizontal spikes nearby that do the same thing. In the narrow corridors along the bottom of the stage, small spheres in the center will each have a line of spike-balls slowly orbiting them either clockwise or anti, so leap over them or pass underneath accordingly. There are 2 spike-balls in the Past, 3 in the Present, and 4 in the Futures.

Pop-up gun turrets fire harmful projectiles out to the left and right in the Present and Past. Use them as a mini-spring too by standing on top when they emerge.
Red and yellow horizontal springs often appear from the ground, attached to a grey block after you've walked past them. Essential for ascending tall, curved walls and they present bucketloads of time warp opportunities. Watch out for similar pop-up spikes though.
Chains of spikeballs rotate slowly through narrow passageways. The later the timezone you're in, the more spikeballs there will be in each instance.

Zone 2 has a couple of features of its own. There are two different large, enclosed rooms that are full of glass bumpers that will break when you hit them, also earning points each. You'll come in from the top or the bottom on the left side of the room, and most of the room is completely filled, wall to wall, with these glass bumpers, and springs or flippers below can launch you up into them. Make your way through by breaking them, and you can either drop down to the exit on the bottom right, or use them to try and bounce through to the alternate top exits. In the Present these bumpers appear as small red spheres within the clear glass, whereas in the Past, they look more like green jewels within it, and the Good Future's version is similar but the jewels have flashing lights on them. The Bad Future's glass bumpers are orange with green and purple spheres inside. The other exclusive feature occurs in two forms towards the end of the zone, on the upper routes. There are huge checkered cylinders that rotate slowly, with small platforms dotted across them, which rotate with it. You can stand on these platforms and use them to get across, but not when they are first emerging from the very top of the cylinder, or when they are at any point on the bottom half of it, as they move downwards. Aim for the upper-middle platforms if you can, and below, there will be springs and other objects underneath to catch you and send you back up. In the Past, the cylinder does not rotate at all, so the platforms remain motionless at various positions across it.

Glass bumpers differ from their standard star-adorned cousins in that they break upon contact, in addition to providing a bounce. Smash your way through several rows of them.
Each timezone has its own colour scheme and inner-object for them.
Giant rotating cylindar, peppered with platforms. The higher ones you can land on, but the lower ones have no purchase and you'll fall right through. This doesn't rotate in the Past.

Collision Chaos features three enemies for you to entertain yourselves with. Blue and yellow winged insect creatures will flutter across the screen slowly after appearing from a state of invisibility, perching themselves on the foreground walls, with their backs to us. Unlike most, they don't go back and forth over a set area, just keep on heading one way, and healthy ones sprinkle some light, harmless yellow dust as they go, which the older, slower and decrepit ones are not capable of. Beware of these near vertical springs, as they'll take advantage of your inability to spin. Green mantis bots on wheels will roll across a set area, and when new ones lock their eyes on Sonic, they begin to fling a couple of small spinning blades his way, that look much like nail clippings, and which will quickly fly straight across, left or right. After this attack, they are helpless however, as are older ones from the get go, but with several of these in one area, it can lead to an annoying frenzy of projectiles that are hard to avoid. If you jump or roll while being hit by them, these spinning nail clippings of doom will instead be deflected harmlessly. Ladybirds meanwhile are the coward's badnik. They hang about, fluttering above the ground usually in narrower corridors or on slower platforms, and when Sonic shows up, they flee away from him, periodically dropping small black spike-balls on the ground. These start to flash red and explode in a small puff of air after a few seconds, and are harmful to touch at any time. The old ones have no spike-balls to drop, and interestingly, if you chase them toward a winding tunnel that leads upwards, they'll actually go up it themselves, rather than carrying on through the foreground. The flowers that Collision Chaos enemies release have yellow, square petals, black stigmas and green stems.

Wnged Insect enemies. They hang on the walls at first, then start fluttering around slowly. New and old.
Green mantis robots, old and new.
Ladybird enemies, new and old.

Hide Notes

Guidance

Use the springs to bounce over the plateaus of spikes. Just to the right of this area is the first room with springs and curved walls - perfect for all your time travel needs.

In the Past, the futuristic neon signs are replaced entirely by chunks of floating rock that you can actually stand on top of.

Hide Notes

Point #1
At the start, you'll be met by Amy Rose. Just stand there with her for a moment and don't touch the spikes - we're doing a cutscene! Shhh..
What? What's this? Metal Sonic bursts through the spikes from the other side and grabs Amy! Sonic can do nothing but watch.
In a flash, Metal is gone! Progress through the tunnel and into the level. We'll catch up with him later, don't you worry.

Wander to the right from the start and you'll find Amy Rose standing there, ready to pester and follow you around again. This may be your first encounter with her if you didn't exit Palmtree Panic Zone 1 in the Present, but she won't latch on to you this time. Go and stand by the two horizontal spike sets on the far right, pointing away from each other at the entrance to the tunnel and let Amy stand still in front of them. Don't touch the spikes, obviously, and you can't get out of this area by jumping up to the above step, so just wait a moment. A few seconds later and something will come blasting through the tunnel and destroy the spikes - it's Metal Sonic, and he's got a hunger for female flesh! He grabs a screaming, writhing Amy, hovers up and blasts off, and there's nothing Sonic can do about it as he watches the dastardly metallic kidnapper escape with his victim. At least he's destroyed the spikes blocking your way so you can head through the twisting tunnel, and begin your pursuit. And by the by, touching Metal as he comes through will not hurt you, and even though you have complete control over Sonic during this event, you can't interact with Amy and Metal after he grabs her.

Hide Notes

Time Travelling Tips

Time Travelling Tips

The best places to time travel in the Present can be found in two separate rooms, where you can easily zip back and forth across curved walls and a ceiling, between a pair of horizontal red springs facing opposing directions. The first one occurs at about the half way point of the zone, in the middle of the map. After you drop down your first long, steep slope and into a lengthy vertical tunnel below, you'll be thrown out to the right where you can either take the higher road or a lower one at the bottom of the stage. Take the lower, which features a series of plateaus with spikes on the top, and pairs of yellow springs on the ground between them that you can use to bounce across. Proceed into a narrow area to the right of this section, and the first vertical yellow spring you find (not the red one just before it) will catapult you up to the ideal spot for time travel. Grab the Past sign inside this room, hit one of the springs and simply let yourself run back and forth along the walls and across the ceiling. Pressing the wrong directional button at the wrong time might cock this up for you, so it's best to just leave all the buttons alone, and Sonic will run all by himself. Another one of these curved rooms isn't far away, but is harder to get to, and occurs at the upper regions of the map, between the first room and the large open pinball areas described in Point #2. It contains a Future post, but a Past one can be found on the paths below, and fluttering enemies nearby might disturb your run, so it's a good idea to hit a rolling spin attack by pressing down, whilst running around this second curved room.

The first of two instances that simply bounce you between two springs around a curved room. A Past post is provided too. Couldn't be simpler.
The second room occurs a little later on, higher up in the zone. Another Past post is just below.

These useful structures are still there in the Past and Futures, but the thing is, the system is no longer connected, so you can't keep running between the springs. In the Past, in both cases, the curve on the top left hand corner does not lead on to the ceiling but takes you straight up through a hole in the wall. However, just like I advised in Palmtree Panic, you can still make use of this by simply falling back down that hole afterwards and hitting the spring again to send you up and out repeatedly, if you want to use this to travel back to the Present. Things are a little trickier with these in the Good and Bad Futures because there is no spring on the right. The curved room instead throws you out of it into a winding tunnel on the bottom right side, and you'll then be running top speed across other parts of the level, where it is possible to achieve time travel, but more risky than methods I've already mentioned. You might want to spin as you're running to fend off any enemies along the way. In the future, backtracking to the first curved room is quite tricky, as you need to use the bumpers to try and bounce your way back through the winding tunnel that the room will throw you out of.

In the Past, the curved rooms have a hole cut into them at the top that the left hand side runs straight up into. It can still be used though, just simply fall back down, towards the spring and your speed will be retained.
A good alternative occurs just before the first curved room. You can use this short curling tunnel to spring up into the air and back down it again.
In the Present, the curling tunnel leads straight up into this decorated pinball slot that will keep your momentum while you're spinning inside it.

So what are the alternatives? Well, right before the first curved room, there's another spring/curve feature than you can take advantage of in all four time zones. Between the the series of spiked plateaus and the red spring just before the curved room (don't use that red spring if you're in the Future as a non-moving platform above will prevent you from being able to get back down), there is a small, curved winding tunnel in the ground below, leading to a yellow horizontal spring. If you just drop into this tunnel, let the spring throw you back out and then leave the D-pad alone, you'll be able to fall back down it repeatedly and maintain suitable momentum. In the Present, there is a hole in the neon signs directly above that will hold you for a few seconds, but also keep your momentum going when you land in it instead of falling back down the tunnel, so it's just as good. Otherwise, you may be able to obtain the necessary amount of top speed simply by bouncing between the various bumpers all over the place, but this is by no means the safest method, though perfectly possible.

Hide Notes

Machine Location

Machine Location

There it is! On a fairly high ledge not far before the middle of the zone. Can be got to from either the left or right however.

In the Past, the Zone 1 machine is located to the left of the first curved room I described in time travelling tips. In that room, use the left horizontal spring to throw yourself up through the hole, then head as far left as possible, in the air. You'll probably miss the platform it's on, but will hopefully land on the long path just below it. Here, head to the right, and a pop-up red horizontal spring will be able to throw you along up the curve. In the air, head as far left as possible, once again, and you should find yourself in the right place. It's surrounded by several ladybirds and blue and yellow flying insects. Alternatively, you can get to this place by taking a big leap off of the first steep slope in the zone, and then carrying on to the right, or, use the slope to drop down into the long vertical tunnel below, and when it throws you out at the bottom, take the higher platform. This is the path just below the machine.

Hide Notes

Metal Sonic Hologram Location

Metal Sonic's hologram, happily trampling on a rabbit, is found near the second curved room in the Past. Right on top it, in fact, just next to the hole in the left hand side of the roof. Destroy the small generator on the right to teach him a lesson.

The hologram is found on top of the second curved room.
Point #2

Continue to the end of the zone and you're likely to get a little bit stuck on one of this level type's most annoying segments - the large pinball style arenas packed with bumpers and springs. There are two huge, open areas separated by a small piece of ground in the middle, and the floor of both is a mass of vertical and diagonal red springs, each perched on a small step that reaches out above the ground. In the first arena, vertical columns made up of two lines of circular bumpers going down, with space between them, can be found above the springs on the far left and right sides. The right one curves around at the bottom, and leads into a steep curved platform. There are also various moving bumpers above both arenas, and the whole situation can be pretty frustrating whichever way you're trying to go to get out of it, as you'll constantly bounce between the springs and the bumpers. When trying to backtrack, the diagonal springs can be a real nuisance. The bumper columns above can be quite useful for time travel when you knock between them at high speeds.

Red vertical and diagonal springs line the uneven floor, so you know you're in for a bit of a chaotic ride.
This is an interesting structure of bumpers, leading you down in a collumn that curves at the bottom.
The upper regions of the second large arena consist of these dispersed bumpers, each moving up and down a short distance.

Hide Notes

In all time zones, you may have to negotiate this slightly threatening corridor with springs below slotting spikes. Run across quickly.

Above the previous corridor, there are high peaks for you to traverse. In the Futures, there are springs between them, at the very bottom, and spikes on top.

While on your way down from the peak of Point #3, jump off just at the right moment onto an awaiting platform that then lifts you straight up to this hidden corridor, containing a future post.

Take the bottom, corridor route towards the end of the zone, when in Good or Bad Future to happen upon a spring, which leads you to more springs, which lead you straight up to a 1-up.

Hide Notes

Time Travelling Tips

Time Travelling Tips

The time travel situation in Zone 2 is much the same as in the first one, but there is only one curved room to run around in this time. Having said that, there are many more opportunities for time travel using other structural-based methods. From the start, hop down the first vertical tunnel in the ground that you come to, which will eventually throw you out to the bottom of the first room filled with glass bumpers. Instead of breaking through them to get to the upper route above, take the lower route on the bottom right of this room. When you come out of the following winding tunnel, there will be a convenient Past signpost next to a red vertical spring. Use this spring to head straight up to the curved room, which operates exactly as the ones in Zone 1 did, so all you need to do is use the horizontal springs to run back and forth along the ceiling and walls. Be careful though, as flying enemies lurk nearby, and will ruin your momentum if you run into them. Eliminate them first, or hit the down button whilst running between the two springs to start rolling instead. Once again, the Past of this room has a hole in the top left hand corner of the ceiling, so you can't use it in the same way, but you can still time travel anyway. Use the left spring to run up the curve and into the space above (you'll come to another ceiling at the top but it won't disturb your speed), and simply fall back down the curve and hit the spring again until you can warp. There's a future post on the left. Also like in Zone 1, using this room for time travel when in the Good or Bad Future is ill-advised as the right side of it becomes a winding tunnel that just throws you into a wall, destroying your momentum.

There's only one easy-peasy curved room in this zone. Take the lowest route from the start and take the spring here to get to it.
Go nuts. Although watch out for nearby enemies who happen to be fluttering through.
Not far to the right of that room, you'll find a sequence of these tall walls with curved floors. Just roll and go!

A good alternative for all time zones however is the section immediately to the right of the room, where there are three curved floors in succession, each with tall walls between them. You need to be careful of enemies along the way, but it's fairly easy to build up some speed as you go up and down either wall, using the curved floor at the bottom. The walls have platform ledges in them, so you can either drop down from above for an instant speedy start, or just begin at the bottom with a spin dash or peel out. As you run back and forth between the walls, press the down button to start spinning when on the curved floor, which will increase speed and protect against the mantis robots on the lower platforms. Whatever you do though, make sure you stay close to the walls as you go. Bumpers between the floors and ceilings of the ledges in the walls can be used for time travelling too, but are a little harder to maintain control over. Failing that, there are numerous tall curved walls with springs facing them throughout the whole zone in all time periods, so time travel is not too difficult anywhere here really, but try and remain within the first half of the zone's map until all your necessary time travelling duties are done, as that's where the action is.

Hide Notes

Machine Location

Machine Location

The machine can really only be accessed from the left this time. Go up through the curved room, and head right to get to it.

The Past's machine is located on a platform above those three curved floor/high wall areas I mentioned in Time Travelling Tips. From the curved room with springs, head up through the hole in the ceiling, and then just pretty much go right, and you'll find it, surrounded by a mantis and ladybirds. You'll have difficulty trying to reach it coming from the right, even by racing across the third pair of high walls, so you'll need to backtrack through them, and head towards the curved room.

Hide Notes

Metal Sonic Hologram Location

In the Past, you'll be able to find the Metal Sonic hologram on the lower entrance into the second room filled with glass bumpers. This is just after heading through a threatening corridor filled with springs and slotting spikes on the ceiling.

Metal is just to the right of the corridor filled with springs and slotting spikes, around the middle portion of the zone.
Point #3
Unless you're in the Past, these springs on platforms move from side to side, making them quite tricky to use to get up top. An alternate way through is to take the hidden passage at the bottom of the wall, where that ring is.
This is what's at the top of the springs. A valuable Past post, late on in the level, so it might be worth your while trying to get to it.

This bit in the Present can be a little tricky. Come out of the top exit of the room filled with glass bumpers and you'll arrive here. Three red springs each mounted on small blocks will move left and right at different vertical positions. You have to try and use them to get up to a huge rotating cylinder with platforms on it, above. As I've mentioned in the objects rundown, these cylindrical platforms can be tricky to land on, especially when using the springs to get to them, as the bottom one alone won't get you up high enough, and then when you're falling back down from that, you have to try and estimate where the other two might be, and attempt to land on one. There is a Past post at the top if you still haven't travelled back in time yet, but if you don't need that, I'd recommend going the easy way. On the ground below the springs, there's a hidden entrance in the right wall, underneath the still platform that you can use to jump on the springs. This will take you into the tall, vertical passageways, and up to the steep slope above, where you can continue the stage. In the other time zones, the alternate exit of this section is made much more obvious, and in the Past, neither the spring platforms nor the huge cylinder is moving.

Hide Notes

Point #4

Collision Chaos Zone 2 is one of only two stages in Sonic history to feature an alternate exit. This one is much higher up than the usual one, accessible in any time zone, by rolling down a high wall from the top of the stage and then flying up out of a curved floor at the bottom. To get to the the point where this can be possible, you'll first need to find your way to the pinball style segment towards the end of the zone, shortly after you've cleared Point #3. This area features four vertical platforms, each with flippers on the sides and a floor full of vertical and horizontal red springs below, just like the later pinball areas of Zone 1, but not quite as annoying. Use the flippers to reach the large rotating cylinder above this area, and hop across its platforms to the area on the right of it. For optimum flips, press the jump button when you're standing further towards the edge of the flipper, rather than closer to the wall, and remember that you cannot stand on either the highest or lowest platforms on the cylinder. If you continue along this upper route, a winding passage will throw you out, down a very steep wall, and you'll fly up out of the curved floor at the bottom. For maximum height, press the down button when you're in the curved floor, and try not to change your direction while flying out of it, and you should just be able to reach the alternate exit ledge, just above the diagonal spring. If you fail, you will not be able to try again, as a pop-up yellow spring in the middle of the curved floor forbids you attempting to regain your speed, and you'll have to settle for the boring old, regular exit.

To get to the hidden exit, you need to start out here nice and high and nice and fast..
..All going well you'll zip straight up the other side, by way of a curved floor, and up to this high ledge. Don't worry about the diagonal spring on the way, you go right past it.
This is your hidden exit. Not a great deal of difference from the regular one really, other than a few extra rings, but at least you can say you got there.

The alternate one doesn't gain you anything special, other than the personal satisfaction of finding a secret exit of Collision Chaos that doesn't really have any obvious point to it, other than for people to be able to say "I found a secret exit of Collision Chaos". And in case you were wondering, the other level that features two different exits is Spring Yard Zone Act 2 in Sonic 1. Star Light Zone Act 2 also has one of sorts, though it doesn't have its own signpost.

Hide Notes

As you head down through the tunnel, Eggman will introduce himself on the right.

For some reason, it's quite easy to lose your rings on these spikes as you come out, even though they're not really facing towards you, so be careful.

Hide Notes

Boss

Boss

This isn't a boss so much as it is a traditional, Sonic Spinball style pinball table, with Sonic as the ball, and all you have to do is get to the top of the table to complete the level. Sounds simple, doesn't it? Well, when I first started playing this game on Mega CD emulation on my PC, it was anything but simple, and was in fact, extremely, frustratingly difficult. Now, I can usually complete it pretty quickly, but a few years ago, this boss would take me anything from about a minute (if I got lucky) to all the way up to the ten minute time limit to complete. Perhaps that was just the emulated, or PC version, as I've found the console version of this boss much easier, but just so you know.. this might well be the most frustrating boss in all of Sonicdom, for you. And if you're taking 10 minutes on this with the dreadful US boss music moaning away the whole time, then you have my deepest pity.

To gain access to the boss' pinball table, jump to destroy this machine that's blocking your way up.
You are shot up to the arena from a collumn on the right, in much the same style as a standard pinball table.

From the start of the zone, a couple of winding tunnels will take you down to the bottom, with a total of 33 rings available on the way. At the end of the bottom corridor, a metal structure stretches across the exit above. Jump into it to remove it with a few explosions, and hit the red spring on the right to be launched into the pinball table. There are four layers of flippers that you can use to make your way upwards, and rings, regular bumpers and glass bumpers are dotted around the place, whose positions vary between the Good and Bad Future versions of this zone. Eggman lurks at the top of the table, in a long, grey contraption with twin cannons that constantly fire small blue bombs throughout the entire ordeal. The bombs don't hurt you, but they do tend to change the course of your direction if you make contact with one while spinning around the table. Fortunately, he doesn't aim them directly at you, and instead tends to fire them more randomly.

There are three main sets of flippers, the bottom pair, upon failure to flip, drop you down to a platform containing two sets of slotting spikes, which are slightly out of sync with each other. This is probably your main danger in the boss.
Eggman randomly throws out these flashing blue bombs across the arena. They don't hurt you but they tend to alter your course if you collide with them.

The bottom two sets of flippers are attached to small, curved pieces of vertical ground, like in standard pinball tables, and if you fall between the last pair down to the very bottom, you'll find yourself on straight ground with a couple of sets of slotting spikes poking up and down. You better hope that when you slip down there, they've decided to be slotting under the ground, so that you can quickly get out through the corridor on the left, and back into the game using the spring. The upper pairs of flippers are attached to either side of the main ground, and next to one of them is another set of spikes (which don't slot) on a right hand ledge. The spikes are really the only thing to worry about, with regard to ring loss, and there are plenty of rings around the table. If the boss goes on for too long, however, you may start to run out. In addition, there's a shield item on an upper left ledge, and below it, down a short winding tunnel is a ten ring item box. On the right side, next to the spikes on the ledge, you will find a convenient extra life when playing this boss in the Good Future.

There's an extra life towards the upper right side, which might be worth taking a break to look into.
This is the ideal spot where you want to be - the top most pair of flippers. You just need to knock your way through the glass bumpers, up to Eggman.

Make it all the way up to the top pair of flippers, remove the opposing glass bumpers and flip yourself all the way up to Robotnik. When you finally make it, you'll hit him once, and a platform will immediately appear just below you, cutting you off from that horrendous pinball table at last. Jump and land another hit to make a higher platform appear below you, and then a final hit will finish off the doctor for good, as he flees the scene. The capsule is just to the right.

As soon as you get high enough, you'll hit Eggman's machine at the top and a platform will immediately appear below you to prevent you from falling back down..
With some degree of satisfaction, keep jumping and hitting Eggman and new platforms will appear below you as you chase him up the collumn. Three will do the job.

Hide Notes

Miscellaneous Notes

- If you're wondering, like I am, exactly why Sonic CD felt it had to break with conventions by putting a pinball style level in the place of the second stage, rather than the typical position of third or fourth stage, you'll find some nerd-ish comfort in the assumption that Collision Chaos was originally intended to be the third stage afterall. Game files that can be easily found on the PC version, and the level select menu clearly numbers Palmtree Panic as stage 1, and Collision Chaos as stage 3, with all subsequent stages being given a number that's one higher than their true stage numbers. Sonic CD was supposed to have the unusual collection of 8 levels, but what happened to the real stage 2?.. No one knows.

Hide Notes

Each section of this page allows users to add their own notes to fill in any missing details or supply additional research etc.

View general notes for Collision Chaos (8)

#1. Comment posted by Chrison Thursday, 4th June , pm (UTC)

How could the past be a pre-historic jungle, if there are METAL GIRDERS, PINBALL FLIPPERS, and BUMPERS all over the stage.

#2. Comment posted by Jaredon Monday, 29th June , pm (UTC)

@chris probably because eggman built them.

#3. Comment posted by Chrison Wednesday, 1st July , am (UTC)

@ Jared
They are already a part of the stage! The only things in the past that are built by Robotnik (Eggman) are thr robots and the roboticizer. The pinball stuff has NOTHING to do with Eggman!

#4. Comment posted by Arzellon Saturday, 19th September , pm (UTC)

The walls of this level appear to reflect the colours of the sky from each of the time frames.

#5. Comment posted by chicoboon Tuesday, 27th December , am (UTC)

You can entirely skip the boss in Act 3 by doing an extremely well timed and placed Peel Out on the first gentle slope by the starting era. After launching the Peel Out jump immediately and you'll hit the right angle to jump over the wall. From there you can just land on the other side and go for the end of the stage and get times around 3 and a half seconds. You can see the results here in this TAS although it's possible without tool-assistance http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=jv5fmbl_S9Q#t=s

The XBLA/PSN version of the game seems to have made this impossible by making the wall higher offscreen to prevent this (seeing as no one in the leaderboards approaches anywhere near 3 seconds at all). This would also make sense as Tails could just easily fly over the wall without needing a precise method like Sonic.

When playing as Tails in XBLA/PSN in Act 1, the Amy event with Metal Sonic is removed and the two spikes blocking the first passageway are removed by default. Tails makes this zone in general incredibly easy by flying over many of the hazards below.

#6. Comment posted by chicoboon Tuesday, 27th December , am (UTC)

I also forgot to add that the has an achievement called 'Take the High Road' which is awarded when taking the higher of the two exits in Act 2.

#7. Comment posted by Anonymouson Sunday, 9th September , pm (UTC)

Your description of the level being never lake is flawed. This zone, along with Palmtree Panic are featured on the picture of Little Planet in the D.A. Garden. It's also shown in the intro that Sonic was already on Little Planet when the game actually starts (Which is DIRECTLY after the intro). Therefore, that is not Never Lake in the background, but just some generic lake from Little Planet.

#8. Comment posted by Anonymouson Saturday, 17th November , am (UTC)

The JP Bad Future soundtrack for this level sounds like a much more serious and set-beat music than the happy-go-lucky Present theme, reflecting the dark and polluted world that Eggman has literally sucked all the fun out of. Just felt like describing the soundtrack a little more ;)

Hide Notes

Sours: http://www.soniczone0.com/games/soniccd/collisionchaos/

Cd sonic robot generator

Peel Out for What - Let's Play Sonic CD

Heads up, Jake! It’s Sonic Boom!

… No the song, not the cartoon.

The Little Planet has appeared over Mobius, and you know what that means: Dr. Robotnik has decided to use it for his next world domination scheme. But that’s not all: the Little Planet is home to the Time Stones, which are powerful gems that can control time itself. With Robotnik planning to steal the stones and mechanize the planet, it’s up to Sonic to travel across the Little Planet and save the day!

Amy Rose is also there.

And that’s Sonic CD! It plays a lot like Sonic 1, but with a twist: in each level are a number of posts that allow Sonic to travel through time. He starts each level in the present, but he can go to the past or the future. Going to the future too soon could be a mistake, though, as he could wind up in a timeline where Robotnik has successfully destroyed the environment in the given area. To prevent that, Sonic can go to the past and destroy a robot generator, which will stop Robotnik’s industrialization of that region. Or he could collect all seven Time Stones located in special stages, and get a guaranteed good future for the rest of the game.

Of the series’ classic 2D platformers, Sonic CD stands out the most. If you’ve ever wondered why, it’s because after the first game released, development was split between two branches. While both branches’ work was supposed to come together, it didn’t. Sonic the Hedgehog 2 released in , while CD released in ’ Sonic CD itself is somewhat of a cult classic; despite the fact that Sonic 2 was clearly favored, this game still has a decent following.

This is a fairly casual run of Sonic CD. I’ll be running though a round each video, and getting the Time Stones as soon as possible. As such I’ll only be going for the robot generators that are required up until the Time Stones are collected. But don’t worry, every bad future WILL appear once, since I’ll be covering the alternate versions of each Zone 3. In addition, I’ll also be linking to the game’s music, mainly because the game’s soundtrack actually differs between the Japanese and US versions. And because even if I’m going to be playing the Japanese version, you should probably listen to those tracks on their own anyway. They’re really good.

5 Likes

Sours: https://www.lp.zone/t/peel-out-for-what-lets-play-sonic-cd/
Sonic CD Full Playthrough (All Generators, Time Stones and Holograms)

Add a Review

  • Behold the "awesome" power of the Mega CD!

    Sonic CD is regarded as the best game for Sega's disastrous early 90s system. Personally, I think the best Mega CD game wasumthere were none. The console was an enormous flop which hurt Sega badly. But if Sonic CD is supposed to represent the system at the apex of it's powers then just how bad were the truly bad games?

    I'll answer that question in another review if I ever get to play them. But for the moment I'll focus on the abyss of disappointment that is Sonic CD.

    Development began in before the release of Sonic 2, thus the general appearance and level design is very close to that of the original Sonic, which dates the game badly for those of you who are more used to the polished, slicker, quicker feel of the sequels. Sometimes you'll go slow you'll begin to wonder why it wasn't called Chronic CD.

    The levels themselves (useless time-travel feature aside) and boring and unengaging, You just breeze through them with little effort and no admiration. There's nothing that stands out and nothing truly define each level with it's own personality or style. The boss battles are also so easy a blind gamer could do it no sweat. And don't even get me started on those awful, awful Special Stages.

    Why this is regarded as being the Mega CD's "must have" is beyond my understanding and I'm a man of noble intelligence. For a system that charged the consumer £ ($) you'd expect to have your mind blown by the content, but Sonic CD rates even lower that Sonic 1.

    Still, at least the music is pleasant.

    Graphics D Sound B Gameplay D Lasting Appeal F

  • Sonic the Hedgehog is one of the most famous video games of all time! The characters, the jumping, the power-ups, and the sure thrill of adventure makes this entire series a fun non-stop playing time! Below is a brief look how I think the game is!

    Game Play: The game play is very good. There is really basic controls here and is easy to perform. Novice gamers should have a good time here!

    Graphics: The graphics are wonderful. The backgrounds are really beautiful!

    Difficulty: The game is easy but as it goes on you''s find out that it will become more difficult!

    Music: The music is great! Just fantastic catchy tunes through out the game! In My opinion its some of the best music ever in a video game!

    Sound: The sound is great. Nuff said!

    Overall: I have always loved Sonic the Hedgehog! If you like excellent adventure games then I strongly recommend you play this game!

    To purchase this video game check out Amazon.com!

  • Sonic CD is the best sonic the hedgehog game of all time. as much as the console/add-on it was made for stank like 3 week old cheeseburger, but out from manure grows beautiful flowers.

    In this game, we are introduced to Amy rose/princess sally, who is kidnapped by metal sonic. so sonic has to rescue her, and destroy something known as the death egg. along the way, sonic picks up time stones which send him back in time, back to when the zone was primitive, and the future stones, which take him to the future, whether it be a good future, or a future in which Robotnik/Eggman rules the zone.

    This game is considered by screwattack.com to be the best sonic game of all time, and rightfully so. according to them, "Sonic CD takes everything you like about sonic 1 and 2, and gave them upgrades." and later on states "It's just like super paper Mario, but 15 years Earlier!"

    So trust me, if you have a gamecube, a sega CD, or a PC, get a hold of this game. you'll be thanking me when you're done.

  • I remember getting Sonic CD for my Computer when I was kid and enjoying it, the only problem was that my PC kept crashing while I was playing the game so I couldn't fully play the game. I still kept the game has a memento, years later I acquired Sonic Gems Collection for the Playstation 2 which contained Sonic CD. ( As well as Sonic the Fighters, Sonic R, a bunch of Game gear games, Vectorman and Vectorman 2.) Playing Sonic CD now I still think it's one of the best games in the Sonic series, it's got great music, a cool opening anime scene and ending, great levels, good boss fights and it introduces one of the most popular villains in the Sonic Francise: Metallix (Metal Sonic), Sonic CD also introduces another ally in Sonic's crew, Amy Rose.

    The game play is easy to pick up especially for those that's played the other 2D Sonic games, a nice little addition to this Sonic game is the time travel feature since in every level there are poles that either say Past or Future. Running into one will allow you to warp through time but to do that you need to run really fast without stopping. Like the other Sonic games this one also has a bonus stage, in Sonic CD you need to destroy a certain amount of UFO's to collect the prize. In other Sonic games after completing a bonus stage you get Chaos Emerleds while in this one it's Time Stones.

    Sonic CD is a great game that should be played. Check this out. 10/10

  • I just finished Sonic CD on Android. I have been a huge Sonic fan ever since I was four years old. I had been wanting to play this game for quite some time, but I have a migraine problem because of which I am unable to play mobile games which have a virtual gamepad. This time however, I was determined to try this for once and get over my pain to see what happens. I did manage to beat this game with a bad ending, and although my head hurt a lot, I am now proud to say that I have played every single classic Sonic game in existence.

    This game is probably the only evidence that Sonic is faster than The Flash, as we need to build up speed if we have to travel to the past or future. It is a bit difficult though, since there are so many obstacles coming in your way when you are on higher levels. One thing I really find annoying in classic Sonic games is that the game wants us to run fast, and then punishes us for doing the same. The touchscreen of the phone was also very unresponsive and that caused me to lose unnecessarily more number of times than I'd be willing to admit.

    Sonic CD is something of a case study for SEGA developers. It does not have any customisable characters, or even a lot of characters for that matter. It introduced two characters who have now become a major part of Sonic's lore. The cutscenes, the quality - everything about this game is perfect. If you're new to Sonic the Hedgehog, I'd recommend you to definitely try it once.

  • "SONIC CD" (). I didn't get to play this until the "SONIC GEMS COLLECTION" () was released and I didn't like it. The spindash was not as good as the Mega Drive games, I couldn't get to grips with the special stages and I had no idea about the time travel element (consequently it just annoyed me). I gave it a bad review and 6/10 on the grounds of what I just described.

    My experience with the mobile version was just as bad (although I did play it enough to get to the end) because I hate Mobile games.

    Then I wondered whether it would be worth playing the original game and when I did it finally made sense to me. It's a vibrant, beautiful, highly detailed game that I can't recommend enough. Honestly it's still my least favourite classic Sonic game but considering how much I love them that doesn't make it bad.

  • This PC CD-ROM and Sega CD game is graphically like the Sega Genesis games, but it has an awesome CD soundtrack with "new fangled" music. If you're looking for a revolutionary Sonic game, try this (it's included with Sonic Gems Collection for GameCube). It was sorely overlooked. Your new enemy is Metal Sonic, as well as Dr. Robotnik/Eggman. The underwater-type zone is still there. It's called Tidal Tempest. One of the boss levels (in the Collison Chaos zone) is reminiscent of Sonic Spinball. The PC version doesn't work with any OS over Windows But if your old junker still has got that, give this one a try. It's really worth it.

  • Sonic CD has a great concept and can work in a 2D Sonic game, in terms of execution it's mixed. Sonic CD has a time traveling mechanic, where you find these signs that say future or past and if you go fast enough, you'll go into the future or past. Now that is a good concept, but it could've been executed better if the level design was better. The levels in the game are not designed for a speedy platformer, it's designed for Mario games, there's obstacles throughout the entire the level that stops you from going fast. The concept would've worked better in sonic 2. The bosses are just like all the bosses in the classic games, bland and boring. The past version of the zones are beautiful I love them, but the future versions are just disgusting to look at, they look like regular zones mixed with a bag of crap. The American version of the soundtrack is ok, but the japanese version of the soundtrack is extremely better. Sonic CD has some cool levels to introduce like stardust speedway, the atmosphere is pretty cool to look at, plus the level design becomes more tolerable once you progress throughout the game more. The time stones are not worth collecting in the game, all you get is a different cutscene at the end. Conclusion: Sonic CD has a lot to like, it has a really cool concept, but in terms of execution, the game is just another version of sonic 1 but with a time travel mechanic, but it is still a fun time playing.

  • Wow, what a game! Its Stunningly designed levels and smooth soundtrack are to die for. Metallic Madness, in good future, has that peaceful chilled out vibe that the music levels in RAYMAN have and what a place to complete the game.

    Sonic's moveset are a step up from the classic SONIC THE HEDGEHOG but otherwise the game is very similar (only much more detailed). The peelout is the main new mechanic, besides time travel, and for some reason the spin dash isn't great in this game.

    I love this game, it's awesome!

  • Playing Sonic CD on the iPad recalls the glory years of the Genesis releases; four great games that were effectively simple, yet complex to master. While this game may be unfairly segregated for originating on the ill-fated Sega CD, it is rightfully a part of the blue hedgehog's early legacy.

    Animated cut scenes detail the opening and endings of the game (which differs based on whether Sonic collects the seven 'time stones'), which sets CD apart from others of its ilk. There is such a diverse palette here that each new area offers something new, yet all the Sonic staples - springs, spikes, item monitors - remain accounted for. Controls are replicated simply on the iPad via a D-Pad and Jump button on the bottom of your screen; these respond well, even to sloppy contact, and they never get in the way of the action (though there may be a small learning curve for those accustomed to a classic controller).

    A charming blend of visuals from the original classic and gameplay advances from the sequel, CD's development history is surrounded by speculation and Sega's own corporate affairs at the time. What is noteworthy about CD now, in , is that despite being an early entry in the franchise it features a gameplay mechanic that perhaps remains the series' most innovative. Utilising time travel, Sonic can move back and forth between past, present and future within each level and change the course of time. This results in differences that alter the challenge, for example increasing difficulty in a 'bad future' where neglected machinery presents a greater threat. This introduces the player to numerous variations on each and every zone, adding a tremendous amount of replay value. The boss battles are amongst the most memorable of the side-scrollers; there's a good reason why the climax of the penultimate level, a nerve-wracking race over slopes and spikes against Sonic's own doppleganger, was recreated in the recent 'Sonic Generations'.

    Having been re-released across multiple platforms by a Sega promoting the game's events as a prequel to 'Sonic the Hedgehog 4', there is no excuse not to have played this terrific entry in Sega's flagship property.

    9/10

  • Sonic CD is a clear example of classic Sonic gaming. I mean, it was so good, it was even re-released in ! It also marks the first appearances of well known characters like Metal Sonic. It features classic game-play and it is easy to play if you are a beginner. If you're a Sonic fan, old or new, it is essential to have this title. Even the graphics themselves, although they are old compared to today's, are beautiful and a technological achievement for The game even looks polished today and provides a good retro service. The music is very catchy. I recommend the Japanese/European track but the American one is good too. The only possibly bad thing about this game is that sometimes, especially in the special stages, it is quite hard. But other than that, Sonic CD is a great game and is an essential title for any Sonic fan.

  • For some reason, In recent Years in the Fanbase of Sonic, Sonic CD with has been Becoming Less liked, despite it being highly praised initially by fans, critics, and a lot of people loved it. Magazines such as Electronic Gaming Monthly's March issue stated it to be one of the best games in the 2D franchise, as a lot of love was given to it by fans and even received a % by some critics in magazines in the original version, which at the time was the HIGHEST rating for sonic games, even higher than the other ones. Honestly I'd say although this is not the best from the franchise, it is certainyl among the ranks of Sonic The Hedgehog 2 (, Sega Genesis). And improves upon a lot from Sonic The Hedgehog (, Genesis)

    First I Suppose I Shall start off with The storyline The games story is very well written and pieced together, It is perhaps one of the best storylines of the initial games!

    The game revolves around Sonic traveling to Little Planet for a vacation when he sees it has been chained to Never Lake with a metallic shell around it. Dr Robotnik is trying to take over the planet and Sonic is followed by star-struck fan Amy Rose who gets kidnapped by Metal Sonic. Sonic must now save the planet and Amy. With the time travel mechanic, the game is able to have different layouts of each zone, with the past having a natural somewhat pre-historic feel and look to it, and the futures can show a robotic nightmarish neglected dystopia ruled by Eggman, or a beautiful place where technology aids nature which can be seen as a deeper message to helping the environment, with the graphics taking advantage of the Sega CD's capabilities.

    Another thing I would like to discuss in this review is the incredible graphics of the game, The graphics are quite beautiful for a game from the early 90's, Sonic CD was released on the Sega CD which is a less known console but this allowed it to go above and beyond with the graphics.

    The stages each have incredible detail to their backgrounds as well as objects and badnik designs. A good example of the backgrounds is in Stardust Speedway.

    In the Present one can see a beautiful starry sky with the ground below covered in sparkling colors of stardust, in the good future one can see amusement parks and a city sparkling in bright colors and in the Bad Future it's storming and a huge city that is well detailed and beautiful to look at. The game uses these different time periods to point out how the zones and Little Planet as a whole will look under a good future scenario, where Dr. Ivo Robotnik fails to take over the zone due to the player either destroying a robot generator or gaining the 7 Time Stones in the Special Stages.

    The soundtrack is another reason this game manages to gain 9 stars from me, it fits the levels perfectly for the most part, and sounds like something you'd expect in a sonic game. Both the US and JP/EU soundtracks have their own good tracks, a lot of them manage to fit the levels. Tidal Tempest, Palmtree Panic, Stardust Speedway, and even Wacky Workbench all sound amazing in both soundtracks and fit the levels well. This game has some of the best quality when it comes to how the songs sound and the OST in general of the classic series games, around on par I'd say with Sonic 3 & Knuckles! An Interesting Thing I Find about the Soundtrack is How The JP/EU one Is heavily inspired by the New Jack Swing genre, and house music with the US one being more rock themed and in tone with the atmosphere of the levels.

    The level design in this game is actually genius and well done for the most part, the reason some stages are bad could be due to the fact that it was in development at the same time as Sonic The Hedgehog 2, And the teams were split one in Japan to work on CD and one in the US to work on Sonic 2. Palmtree Panic has a bunch of speed sections to where you can go fast (if you wanted to), tons to explore and lots of interaction and honestly just because the game requires exploring to find past and future signs to time travel does not make it a bad game by any means, in all honesty.

    Stardust speedway is also a really good level design, obstacles here and there, some popping out of the ground with robots and speed sections, to requiring the player to not just simply hold right but to learn the layout and use cannons to get to certain parts to reach the end (like the mini maze in zone 2).

    Tidal tempest is also surprisingly good when it comes to level design as well as obstacles that can kill you and pose a threat whether it be spikes, the dragon totem things that shoot blue fire that pushes you down which in certain scenarios can lead to getting crushed if not timed right (like the sections with the boxes i mean) which leads to a challenge, there are crushers, spikes, spike pits, a decent amount of enemies in each level, And more can be gotten out of the game if one puts the effort in to time travel.

    And they also have speedy areas of which the player can go fast if they so choose similar to sonic 1 and the others. The goal posts at the end is basically telling the game "Im done with this stage", you have to time travel to create a good future requiring the player to put effort into doing so, exploring for the robot generator, to enter these you have to maintain sonics speed after hitting a sign post, this multi step process of travelling to the past, finding the robot generator, and exiting takes advantage of the games level design which forces the player to interact with elements.

    The first step requires an understanding and skillful execution of the games mechanics. Reaching the required velocity is the hard part which poses a challenge, having to scout out the level for areas that have access to fluid movement, some are easy like two springs facing each other, others requiring the player to search around the zone and do an obstacle course (sort of going against the claims levels are too easy with no effort required to beat, unless you decide to skip everything and just stay in the present, holding right and jumping a few times) and avoiding obstacles like other sonic games. The stages were designed cleverly to both have a little challenge if you're trying to play it like how one would play sonic 1, while having maximum use and effect with a little challenge if you play it the way its meant to be played (time travelling) as you can see through how the stage loops together. Tons of spring based platforming, loops upon loops, messing with conveyor belts, and levels that take a couple minutes to reach the goal if played by putting effort in, make you learn the intricacies of the individual stage to the point you'll even learn the maps by the end of the game! If you play it just simply as you would the other classic games it isn't much a super fun way to play, you're running past genius level concepts, loop-de-loops, obstacles, and never take the time to breathe in any of the fresh new experimental concepts and interesting gameplay.

    Sure the game doesn't really tell you the best way to play it, but you can get hints by finding the past and future signposts or reading the manual. Though I will say levels such as Collision Chaos, Wacky Workbench, and Metallic madness are horribly done. Metallic madness gets repetitive in each zone, and extends too long especially in the second zone. The enemies are a bit of a joke, Wacky Workbench is a good concept but is executed poorly with the bounce mechanic being very annoying and over the top.

    And Collision Chaos has a hard boss fight somewhat on your first few attempts, although not in the good way it's just annoying.

    The variation in levels and zones are done VERY well. This game changes up the layouts of the map, object locations, platforming, and badniks in each zone.

    Some zones it can be easy to time travel, while others being hard to do so requiring the player to put effort into beating the game with the good ending, you are the one in charge of the future of THE PLANET. Each zone has different variations in the Past, and Good Future, and Bad Future. How you play in the past affects the future either resulting in a toxic environment, more obstacles sometimes than in the past or present when you get a bad future, and the Good Future having beautiful colors, and a lot of detail and care is put into each zone. They are very fun to play in, with tons to interact with when you put in the effort to time travel. You can even get a little enjoyment out of skipping time travel and just exploring and beating the Present of the stages.

    The boss fights in Sonic CD in all honesty however are a huge issue. The first zones boss (Palmtree Panic) is so easy to the point it's a joke for the most part. All you need to do is jump into Robotnik when he holds still after barely stepping towards you, and doing no attacks. Collision Chaos' provides a tiny bit of a challenge but is very annoying and poorly executed. Wacky Workbenches and even the FINAL BOSS don't require much effort to beat either, with almost no danger. In fact, the danger in the final boss mainly comes to Metallic Madness zone 3 having the only bottomless pit in the game.

    The only truly challenging boss fight in my opinion is the Metal Sonic race in Stardust Speedway. Metal Sonic's moveset rivals sonics and he can blast into you, making you fall behind and sometimes hit Robotnik's laser beam and having an instant death, he can electrocute you if you're behind him, and his speed can rival Sonic's easily. This boss fight takes a few attempts usually, and the spikes can stop you dead in your tracks leaving you vulnerable.

    I dare say Sonic CD's special stages are a big issues as well, It takes forever to turn, and Sonic's controls being wonky and hard to understand. The water takes away too much time from your timer, and the UFO's paths are too hard to predict most of the time leading to you messing up.

    Overall, Sonic CD is a great game but with some flaws and issues.

  • Sonic CD was the fifth sonic game i ever played and remains one of my favorites to this day. I was introduced to sonic through my first game Sonic Heroes which i immediately fell in love with the characters, story and gameplay.

    One thing I absolutely LOVE about this game is time travelling, which as the name implies, Sonic can travel through time to the past, present, and the future! This is a definitely a super creative and clever concept. The amount of effort put into the detailing and visuals as well as the decoration to really put the prehistoric feel of the past, or the toxic wasteland of the bad future is really incredible. A fun and clever mechanic of having to destroy the robot generator to affect the future is well thought out and adds to the fun factor!

    Another very well thought out and executed concept is Sonic's new move, the Super Peel Out! Which lets the player go at amazing speeds after charging it for a few seconds, with the animation being quite cool especially for a Sega CD game.

    The level design in most stages is actually quite good and I love the speed sections and the cool up ramps in Palmtree Panic, the little traps and pipes as well as the layout of the somewhat unique and beautiful Tidal Tempest, or the awesome speedway feel to Stardust Speedway and the many loops and boosts!

    Another neat thing I liked is that this was the first Sonic game to introduce a save feature, allowing the person playing to continue where they left off without having to restart from Act 1. My favorite Classic sonic game, and the best in my opinion, Sonic 2 lacks this and I'm glad this game has it.

    The soundtrack of this game is definitely AMAZING and unforgettable for the JP/EU soundtrack and arguably the US soundtrack too. Both go for their own unique feel with the US taking a more atmospheric and rock-like style, with the Japanese one taking a really groovy funky 90's pop music feel.

    The graphics are stunning and beautiful especially for Sega CD standards, and really add to the overall beauty of this game.

    The plot of saving an entire planet, and freeing it from the clutches of the evil Dr. Eggman, and restoring the natural beauty while also having to save fangirl Amy Rose and face off against a robotic doppelganger, Metal Sonic is really creative and a unique plot! Probably one of the more detailed of the classic games.

    And the intro and ending are just so good, the aesthetic and artstyle are simply fantastic and were produced by Toei animation, this artstyle ended up influencing stuff like the cutscenes in Sonic Mania or the fantastic OVA from , which I love so much to where I bought the film on DVD.

    Really the last thing I can name thats good before I go into the flaws of the game are the Christian Whitehead remaster's fixes and additions. Such as how the music loops properly in this version with the Japanese OST using the beta music loops that went unused in the initial Sega CD version which makes the soundtrack sound that much better, and you can switch the awkward spindash of the original game to the Sonic 2 one. This version also has Tons of Collision fixes.

    I also love the new characters introduced here, Amy Rose and Metal Sonic.

    Onto the negatives of this game, here we go

    I genuinely hate this games spindash. The Spin Dash in this game is somewhat awkward to use: you have to hold down on the D-pad and hold the jump button until Sonic revs up properly and let go of the button, which can take a while as opposed to mashing the jump button and letting go of the D-pad to get Sonic to take off like in Sonic 2 and 3. Failing to do so will result in Sonic not taking off at incredible speed and just standing where he is, which is clunky and annoying.

    The boss fights are simply lackluster and lack any real difficulty, especially the final boss which is pretty weak especially comparing it with the other games of this era. Most can simply be defeated in 4 hits no problem. The Metal Sonic race though is pretty challenging and iconic.

    The collision detection in the original Sega CD version can be pretty wonky and make no sense at times, and can lead to glitches sometimes and deaths.

    The Special Stages controls are really hard to understand at times, and they are pretty annoying personally I dislike the backgrounds distracting colors and the fact of how hard it is to predict the UFOs movement patterns.

    Some songs don't fit the stage and its future condition very well, such as the JP version of Palmtree Panics Bad Future or the US version of Metallic Madness' Good Future. They are good songs but don't fit the atmosphere.

    Some of the level designs and gimmicks like the pinball fight in Collision chaos are executed poorly and are annoying, or Wacky Workbench and the bouncing. I also personally dont like the conveyor belts of Quartz Quadrant.

    Overall, In conclusion I believe Sonic CD is a fun and great game that I highly recommend with a fresh mindset!

  • Sonic CD () is basically an extremely advanced version of the first Sonic the Hedgehog (). Very original Sonic graphics with a twist, Catchy soundtrack, over 60 levels featuring time travel and exciting 3D special stages.

    This game will blow your mind if you're a true Sonic fan. Truly amazing and spectacular. If you haven't played Sonic CD, you're really missing out.

    I enjoyed this game very much from its original graphics, game-play, game art and music. It all tied together to create fun old-fashioned Sonic game-play that we enjoy. I recommend this game to anyone of any age.

Sours: https://m.imdb.com/title/tt/reviews/?ref_=tt_ql_urv

Now discussing:

STEAM
This item has been removed from the community because it violates Steam Community & Content Guidelines. It is only visible to you. If you believe your item has been removed by mistake, please contact Steam Support.
This item is incompatible with Sonic CD. Please see the instructions page for reasons why this item might not work within Sonic CD.
Current visibility: Hidden
This item will only be visible to you, admins, and anyone marked as a creator.
Current visibility: Friends-only
This item will only be visible in searches to you, your friends, and admins.
The past signpost can be found just to the left of the underground tunnel.

Peel out from the left most (stable) edge of this platform straight into the tunnel. Do not hold right, just let Sonic fall into the past. Continuing right, the Metal Sonic Hologram can be found at the bottom of mountain that has a waterfall running through it.

The Roboticizer can be found on the second half of large archway after the final shuttle loop just before the goal signpost.
A past signpost can be reached by jumping off the tall shuttle loop before entering the underground tunnel.

Spin dash from the rightmost edge of the platform with the past signpost into the tunnel to enter the past. The tunnel should fire Sonic directly into or just over the Roboticizer.

Continue right along the top path until reaching a future signpost, then fall to the path below. The Metal Sonic Hologram will be just after the log bridge.
Halfway through the stage on the lower path is a red spring followed by a yellow spring. Take the yellow spring up to a past signpost.

Use the two red springs in this area to enter the past. Then use the left red spring to sail high and far left to a platform with the Roboticizer.

Return to the red spring area that previously had the past signpost and continue right from there, following the upper path. At a similar area, this one containing a future signpost, use the left red spring to reach the top of the spring area were the Metal Sonic Hologram can be found.
Take the lower path out of the red sphere area to find a past signpost.

Use the red spring immediately right of the past signpost to reach another red spring area which can be used to enter the past. From that area head right along the upper path to reach the Roboticizer.

Drop down from there and follow the bottom path right to find the Metal Sonic Hologram just after the area of red springs below spikes.
Continue on normally until reaching an area with a gargoyle spitting blue across a red spring. Use the red spring to reach the area above with a past signpost hidden in the right wall.

Use the red springs facing each other to the left of the signpost to enter the past. Return to the previously mentioned area and continue right. The Metal Sonic Hologram can be found immediately after hitting the bottom to the left.

Continue right until reaching a dead end and use the nearby yellow spring to head upward and then a second yellow spring to the high path. The Roboticizer can be found by continuing right on the top path.
From the start of the stage, drop down the first gap and off the platform to the path below. Continue right, jump over the gap and platform to continue down this path. Jump over a yellow spring and continue through the corridor between a platform and the path, then head left. Pass over the three spike ejectors and continue left to a past flag.

From the leftmost part of this platform, peel out to the right and continue on through a tunnel-like pathway into the past. The Roboticizer can be found by jumping from the end of the upper path of that tunnel-like pathway to an enclosed area. With a little luck, this is where you'll end up the moment you enter the past.

Use the booster off the left of this area to ramp up to the middle path. Continue right until reaching a red spring. Use this to spring up to the top path. Follow the top path until reaching a gap with a spike ejector. Drop down this gap to find the Metal Sonic Hologram.
Note: After defeating Metal Sonic in Zone 3 of Stardust Speedway, there are no more Holograms.

From the start of the stage, keep to the top path. Beyond the area with three red springs which point to the upper left, a past signpost can be found.

Continue right until meeting with a moving red spring. Use this to get to the top path. Follow the path right and fall straight down at the red spike seesaw area. Peel out into the yellow springs pointing at each other to enter the past.

Drop down at the first opportunity, being careful to avoid a moving red spring below. Continue right on the bottom path until meaning a dead end. Take the disappearing platforms and then a red spring up until reaching an area with the Roboticizer.
Note: After defeating Metal Sonic in Zone 3 of Stardust Speedway, there are no more Holograms.

From the start of the stage, take the middle path to a dead end at the second series of tunnels. Choose left at the tunnel junction. Continue left on the top path until you reach the past signpost.

Hit the past signpost and use the two red springs facing each other to enter the past. Once in the past, head right to a tunnel series entrance. Jump in and choose left at the junction. Continue on to the right, keeping to the higher path. Ride the piston up to a red spring. The Roboticizer can be found in the area above.
Close
Sours: https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=


19838 19839 19840 19841 19842