Firefox or chrome 2017

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Firefox FAQ

Whether you searched for a fast browser, or you’re looking for independent tech that protects your privacy, this FAQ is here to answer the most pressing Firefox-related questions.

Download Firefox Firefox Privacy Notice

  • What is Firefox?

    The Firefox Browser is the only major browser backed by a not-for-profit that doesn’t sell your personal data to advertisers while helping you protect your personal information. Learn more about the Firefox Browsers and other products.

  • How do I get the Firefox Browser?

    You can easily download the Firefox desktop browser here. Firefox works on Windows,Mac and Linux devices, and is also available for Android and iOS. Make sure you’re downloading our browser from one of our trusted Mozilla/Firefox pages.

  • Is Firefox free?

    Yep! The Firefox Browser is free. Super free, actually. No hidden costs or anything. You don’t pay anything to use it, and we don’t sell your personal data.

    Related questions: is Firefox Browser free, does Firefox cost money
  • Is Chrome better than Firefox?

    No, we don’t think Chrome is better than Firefox, and here is why: when people ask which browser is better, they’re really asking which browser is faster and safer. Firefox is updated monthly to make sure you have the speediest browser that respects your privacy automatically.

    See how Firefox compares Chrome.

    Related questions: is Firefox better than Chrome, is Firefox better than Google, is Firefox safer than Chrome, is Firefox more private than Chrome
  • Is Firefox safe to download?

    Protecting your privacy is our number one priority, and we ensure that installing Firefox on your devices is completely safe — but always make sure you are downloading from a trusted Mozilla/Firefox site, like our download page.

  • Is Firefox safe?

    Not only is Firefox safe to use, it also helps keep your data and private information safe. The Firefox Browser automatically blocks known third party trackers, social media trackers, cryptominers and fingerprinters from collecting your data. Learn more about the privacy in our products.

    Related questions: is Firefox good for privacy, is Firefox secure, is Firefox better for privacy
  • Does Firefox sell your personal data?

    Nope. Never have, never will. And we protect you from many of the advertisers who do. Firefox products are designed to protect your privacy. That’s a promise.

  • Why is Firefox so slow?

    Firefox isn’t slow… now. In , we completely rebuilt our browser engine (called Quantum), to ensure Firefox could compete with other major browsers. And, our tracker blockers help pages load even faster. So Firefox is lightning fast without sacrificing any of your privacy.

  • Is Firefox Chromium based?

    Firefox is not based on Chromium (the open source browser project at the core of Google Chrome). In fact, we’re one of the last major browsers that isn’t. Firefox runs on our Quantum browser engine built specifically for Firefox, so we can ensure your data is handled respectfully and kept private.

  • Does Firefox use Google?

    Google is the default search engine in Firefox, which means you can search the web directly from the address bar. Learn more about search engine preferences and changing defaults.

  • Does Firefox have a built-in VPN?

    Firefox does not have a built-in VPN (virtual private network), but there are two products made by Mozilla/Firefox that you can use in addition to the private Firefox Browser that can protect either your browser (Firefox Private Network) or device (Mozilla VPN) connection on WiFi, as well as your IP address.

    Related questions: does Firefox hide your IP address
  • Who owns Firefox?

    Firefox is made by Mozilla Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of the not-for-profit Mozilla Foundation, and is guided by the principles of the Mozilla Manifesto. Learn more about the maker of Firefox here.

    Related questions: who is Firefox owned by, who owns Firefox Browser, is Firefox owned by Google, is Mozilla Firefox owned by Google

Download Firefox Firefox Privacy Notice

Sours: https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/faq/

The web browser is by far the most important piece of software on your PC—at least for most users. Unless you’re at a workstation crunching numbers or editing the next Star Wars you probably spend the majority of your computer time staring at a web app or a website.

That’s why it’s important to make sure you’ve always got the best tool for the job, and in that does not include Internet Explorer. If you still want the built-in option for Windows that would be Edge, but it’s hard to stick strictly with Edge when you’ve got other choices including Google’s Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Opera.

Let’s take a look at the four major (and modern) browsers to see how they stack up in

(If none of these internet browsers strike your fancy, head over to PCWorld's roundup of 10 intriguing alternative browsers.)

Browsers in brief

Chrome

chromelogoGoogle

The current people’s champion, Google Chrome tops the metrics charts of both StatCounter and NetMarketShare by a huge margin. Google’s browser has built a dedicated fan base thanks to its massive extensions library, and the fact that it just gets out of your way to put the focus on web content, not the browser’s trimmings.

Chrome isn’t quite as simplistic as it once was, but it’s still very easy to use. There isn’t much to Chrome except a huge URL bar—known as the OmniBar—plus a space for extensions, a bookmarking icon, tabs, and that’s it.

Yet Google still finds a way to hide all kinds of features inside the browser, including deep integration with Google’s services. This allows you to sync your bookmarks, passwords, open tabs, and more across devices. Chrome also has multi-account support if you need it on a family machine, a built-in PDF viewer, built-in Google Translate functionality, a task manager, and the always handy Paste and go context menu item.

If there’s one complaint people have about Chrome it’s that the browser eats up available memory. Our browser testing in showed that Chrome was definitely a memory beast, but two years later it fared pretty well in our tests.

Firefox

mozilla firefox logoMozilla

For users who love extensibility but want greater privacy than a Google-made browser can provide, the open source Mozilla Firefox is your best bet. Firefox paved the way for other browsers to become extensible, and while Firefox’s add-on catalog is pretty good, it now pales in comparison to the Chrome Web Store. Like Google, Firefox has a sync feature.

Where Firefox has really shined in recent years is with the browser’s incognito mode. All browsers have a private mode that lets you browse without any of your activity being logged in your saved history. But most of the time these private modes still allow websites to track your activity for that specific session. Firefox does away with this by including an ad and tracker blocker when using incognito mode.

Opera

operabrowserOpera

Before Chrome, Opera was a popular choice among power users—a position former Opera CEO Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner is trying to take back with Vivaldi. Opera today is really one of the more under-rated browsers around. It’s based on the same core technologies as Chrome (the Blink rendering engine and the JavaScript V8 engine), which means it can run many Chrome extensions—there’s even an extension for installing extensions from the Chrome Web Store.

Opera’s also got a few unusual features like Turbo, which saves on load times and bandwidth by compressing webpages on Opera’s servers. It’s also got a nice security feature called domain highlighting that hides most of the URL so that users can see easily and clearly if they’re on Google.com or google.com.scam.com—with scam.com being the actual website.

More recently, Opera introduced its own take on the social sidebar with one-click access to services such as WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, and Telegram. Like Chrome and Firefox, Opera also has its own cross-device syncing feature.

Microsoft Edge

microsotedgeMicrosoft

Microsoft Edge is still a work in progress. You'll see below that its performance is getting better, but that’s not all there is to the browser in The Edge extensions library is tiny, its sync functionality is near nonexistent, and it doesn’t get updates nearly fast enough—though that is expected to change with the Fall Creators Update.

Despite its shortcomings, Edge has several helpful features that will appeal to some. Edge is deeply integrated with Windows 10’s inking capabilities, as well as with OneNote, making it easy to clip a webpage, annotate it, and save it to a notebook. Cortana is also a big part of Edge. You can use Microsoft’s digital assistant to quickly search for information, compare prices, or get a quick calculation.

Like Chrome, Edge has a casting feature. There’s also a nifty set-aside tabs feature to stash a collection of websites, the ability to read ebooks (great for tablets), and an MSN.com-ish new-tab page.

Read on for our benchmark results and our pick for best browser.

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Sours: https://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/article//best-web-browserschrome-edge-firefox-opera-go-head-to-head/
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Firefox aims to win back Chrome users with its souped up Quantum browser

The last half-decade hasn’t been great for Firefox marketshare. Chrome first overtook Mozilla’s browser back in late and now hovers above percent, according to StatCounter numbers. But after a fair amount of struggles, Mozilla’s been undergoing an interesting sort of renaissance of late, and is banking on its new Quantum browser to bring bygone users back into the Firefox fold.

After two months of beta testing, the 57th version of the browser drops today for public consumption, belying the slow moving condiment that shares its build number. According to the foundation’s numbers, the latest build users percent less memory than the competition when running on a Windows System.

It’s also somewhere in the neighborhood of double the speed of the two-month-old Firefox 52 (aw, memories), according to benchmarks on a Surface Laptop. Mozilla’s team has also built a new engine here to make the experience of switching between tabs smoother than before. That’s paired with a new streamlined UI called Photon, which appears to take some minimalist cues from the mobile browsing experience.

There are other bells and whistles, too, including additional integration with the read-it-later service, Pocket, recommending stories based on the sites you frequent.

“We looked at real world hardware to make Firefox look great on any display, and we made sure that Firefox looks and works like Firefox regardless of the device you’re using,” SVP Mark Mayo explains in a post. “Our designers created a system that scales to more than just current hardware but lets us expand in the future.”

It all seems to be a step in the right direction — the first Firefox felt revolutionary back in , but browsers like Chrome and Safari have taken great pains to strip excess baggage in order to make browsing as fast as possible. Meantime, Firefox&#;s marketshare has slipped substantially. 

Actually convincing users to switch back — or even try Firefox for the first time — is a different conversation altogether, of course. Change is tough with a daily driver like a browser. But interested parties can check it out now for Windows, Mac and Linux. A similarly designed version will follow soon for iOS and Android.

Sours: https://techcrunch.com//11/14/firefox-aims-to-win-back-chrome-users-with-its-souped-up-quantum-browser/

It's been years since I gave a second thought to my web browser. Safari's fine, Microsoft Edge is whatever, I think Opera still exists? None have ever offered much reason to switch away from Chrome, Google's fast, simple web tool. I'm not the only one who feels this way, either: Chrome commands nearly 60 percent of the browser market, and is more than four times as popular as the second-place finisher, Firefox. Chrome won the browser wars.

So my expectations for Firefox Quantum, the new browser from Mozilla, were not particularly high. Mozilla made big promises about Quantum's speed and efficiency, which are what everyone makes big promises about when they launch a new browser, and they never really make a difference in the experience. Sure, a couple dozen Chrome tabs can bring even the beefiest computer hardware grinding to a beach-balling halt, but Chrome does the job. What could Firefox even do to win me over?

It turns out there are lots of things Firefox Quantum could do to improve the browser experience, and it did many of those things. The new Firefox actually manages to evolve the entire browser experience, recognizing the multi-device, ultra-mobile lives we all lead and building a browser that plays along. It's a browser built with privacy in mind, automatically stopping invisible trackers and making your history available to you and no one else. It's better than Chrome, faster than Chrome, smarter than Chrome. It's my new go-to browser.

The speed thing is real, by the way. Mozilla did a lot of engineering work to allow its browser to take advantage of all the multi-core processing power on modern devices, and it shows. Every page seems to load one beat sooner than I expect, which makes the whole browsing experience that much more efficient. It's not life-changingly different, and I can't say I notice the percent advantage Mozilla swears it has over Chrome, but it definitely feels zippier. I definitely notice Firefox's better memory usage; I routinely find myself with 30 or 40 tabs open while I'm researching a story, and at that point Chrome effectively drags my computer into quicksand. So far, I haven't been able to slow Firefox Quantum down at all, no matter how many tabs I use.

Again, though, speed and memory aren't enough to merit the hassle of switching browsers (even if they should be). Rather, it's the little things, the things you do with and around the web pages themselves, that make Firefox really work. For instance: If you're looking at a page on your phone and want to load that same page on your laptop, you just tap "Send to Device," pick your laptop, and it opens and loads in the background as if it had always been there. You can save pages to a reading list, or to the great read-it-later service Pocket (which Mozilla owns), both with a single tap. Pocket also surfaces a bunch of articles you might like when you open a new tab, which is a delightful way to bring actual browsing back to the browser.

Quantum feels like a bunch of power users got together and built a browser that fixed all the little things that annoyed them about other browsers. It has a QR code reader built in. It has a menu item for copying a URL, and if you've ever tried to copy and paste a long URL on your phone you know how nice that is. Firefox even makes screenshots more intuitive: it can capture a section, everything on your screen, or the entire webpage all at once. You can even turn on "Night Mode" and invert the colors on most blindingly white websites. All these things are so fiddly in other browsers, requiring bookmarklets and extensions to work. Firefox just put them all in the browser.

Firefox has always been a remarkably customizable app, and Quantum takes the idea even further. You can move all the buttons around, change every color and font, and even control the visual density of the app itself. You're able to choose which app opens when you click on an email address, which every Gmail user will appreciate. Mozilla has a huge library of add-ons, and if you use the Foxified extension, you can even run Chrome extensions in Firefox. Best I can tell, there's nothing you can do in Chrome that you can't in Firefox. And Firefox does them all faster.

Aesthetically, Firefox looks just like Chrome, which is a good thing. Rather than separate the search bar and address bar, Quantum combines them, just like Chrome. Tabs are rectangular and uncomplicated, as they should be. Since it's doing so much, Quantum does get a bit cluttered in spots, like when you search in the box and it offers you autocomplete options, search results, and a bunch of other search-engine options all in the same window. But in general it's clean and simple, like a good browser should be.

Switching browsers is kind of a pain. They're the most important, most-used apps on just about all our devices, and there's a steep learning curve in trying to figure out a new one. And in a few cases, it might even be impossible; I can't use the Conde Nast CMS in anything other than Chrome, so I can't switch completely. But if there's ever been a reason to spend an hour importing bookmarks, installing extensions, and tweaking all your settings just so, Firefox Quantum is it. It's a truly browser, and it might be the only one.

Sours: https://www.wired.com/story/firefox-quantum-the-browser-built-for/

2017 firefox or chrome

Firefox Quantum vs Chrome: Are the tides shifting?

Video: Firefox Quantum will give you a faster browser but there's a price to pay

Mozilla has a new web browser, called Firefox Quantum, to compete with Google Chrome.

Firefox Quantum launched in November for Android, iOS, Linux, Mac, and Windows users. This latest version arrives more than a decade after Mozilla first released its iconic Firefox browser. Mozilla said Firefox Quantum is designed to be twice as fast as its Firefox predecessor from last year -- while using 30 percent less computer memory than the Chrome browser.

That's great marketing speak, but is Firefox Quantum truly better than Google's rival browser? If you'd like to learn about what types of updates Firefox Quantum brings to the table, or how these two top-tier browsers stack up, we've broken out all the stats and features worth paying attention to, with the hopes of helping you figure out which is browser is better.

Read also:What's 's fastest Windows 10 web browser?

What are Firefox Quantum and Chrome's market shares?

Usage today

In December , just one month after Firefox Quantum's release to the public, Mozilla announced there have been 44 percent more downloads from Chrome users compared with this time last year. On Android and iOS devices, specifically, Firefox installations spiked 24 percent.

Started at the bottom

It's important to put that information into context: First, when Chrome debuted in , it quickly become the de-facto web browser of choice. Before then, it seemed like everyone was using Firefox as an alternative to Microsoft's Internet Explorer or Apple's Safari. Chrome made Firefox irrelevant -- a stigma that's only now starting to reverse course. According to the Digital Analytics Program, in January , Chrome dominated US web browser use (with percent market share), followed by Safari (with percent) and Internet Explorer (with percent market share). Firefox tumbled to fourth place (with percent).

Yet, a month after the launch of Quantum Firefox, Mozilla confirmed a total of million people have installed the new browser, which lets you open over 1, tabs in mere seconds.

Read also: Chrome is the most popular web browser of all

firefox-quantum-robot-suitwallpaper-4k-compressed.jpg

What's new in Firefox Quantum?

Before we get any deeper into Firefox Quantum, you should know that it is technically called version 57 of the Firefox browser. The "Quantum" name comes from the project that turned Firefox into what it is now -- but the name has stuck. Everyone says it, so we will, too.

Speed

Underneath the redesigned interface is a new browsing engine, born from the Quantum project, along with new multiprocessing technology that Mozilla has built for the browser. Firefox Quantum also features an AMD VP9 hardware video encoder that helps to reduce battery consumption by cutting background tabs' video decoding. The result is a browser that is lean yet built for multi-tasking multiple tabs with percent less hang time - all while using less RAM than Chrome. You can run 3D games at near-native speeds and browse confidently knowing Firefox is using enough memory to let you work while leaving plenty of memory to keep your computer responsive. Firefox uses times less memory than Chrome, Mozilla said.

Design

We all want a browser that feels fast and lean, but we also want one that looks great. Luckily, Firefox Quantum doesn't disappoint. You'll immediately see visual changes throughout the browser -- whether looking at its toolbar icons, Settings menu, New Tab page, etc. It makes Chrome feel dated. If, for whatever reason, you don't like the new look, Firefox Quantum lets you customize it to suit your preferences. You can move all the buttons, change all the colors and fonts, and even control the visual density of the browser. You can also choose from thousands of themes. Check out some of the available themes here.

Features

Firefox Quantum comes loaded with nifty tricks. Like Chrome, it has a built-in QR code reader and a menu item for copying a URL. Firefox Quantum even streamlined screenshotting: You can capture a section, everything on your screen, or the entire webpage all at once. You can even turn on "Night Mode" to invert the browser's colors. You can also install extensions and add-ons, sync the browser and share open tabs across mobile, desktop, or tablet, manage your passwords and even give your computer a master password for extra security, and browse privately.

Mozilla bills Firefox Quantum as an open-source browser that doesn't sell access to your online data and lets you opt-in to privacy so you can freely browse. With Private Mode, for instance, Firefox Quantum can actively block unwanted content, including ads, analytics trackers, and share buttons for social media that may record your behavior without your explicit permission.

Read also: Firefox Quantum: A cheat sheet for professionals (TechRepublic)

7-google-chrome-geralt-zdnet-eileen-brown.jpg

How does Chrome compare?

Speed

Both browsers have been put through synthetic benchmark tests by several sites, including ZDNet, and in most of these cases, the latest version of Firefox beats Chrome, especially in regards to advanced workloads and programming techniques. In our test, we noted the results show there's been a lot of effort put into Firefox's performance over the past year. However, we also couldn't feel too much of a speed difference -- and that's hardly a surprise, given how fast modern browsers have become and how the gap between them has narrowed.

If you want to know more more about Chrome and the technical details behind its speed, like WebKit, V8 JavaScript engine, and more, check out this comic book Google made. It explains everything you need to know, complete with illustrations. Those of you who want to know even more, like the inner workings of DNS pre-resolution or DOM bindings, Google has technical videos here. It's all a bit geeky, but the information is there.

That said, Mozilla released its own promotional video that directly compares both browsers. It tested page loading times for 10 of the most popular websites. In each instance, Firefox Quantum was twice as fast as the Chrome browser. You can check the entire video here.

Design

It feels like Chrome has looked the same for years -- despite Google's Material Design efforts. So, if you're feeling a little tired of Chrome's look, too, you might be charmed by Firefox Quantum's sharp "Photon" interface. Just don't expect a jaw-dropping new browsing experience -- it's still just a web browser. In fact, Firefox Quantum looks a lot like Chrome. Rather than separate the search bar and address bar, it combines them, just like Chrome, and tabs across both browsers are rectangular and simple. Plus, we have to give credit where it's due: Firefox Quantum isn't the only web browser available with its own theme store for customization. You can just as easily go browse thousands of themes available for Chrome, from here.

Features

Google has always tried to pitch Chrome as a secure browser. It has built-in malware and phishing detection, thanks to sandboxing and safe browsing technology, as well as auto updates that bring security fixes. It also has several privacy tools at your disposal. For instance, like Firefox Quantum's Private Mode, Chrome has something called an Incognito mode. It mostly auto-deletes cookies instead of auto-block ads that track. But, with Chrome, you can customize some preferences by website, including permanently mute autoplaying video ads, a move that should make your web-browsing experience much less interruptive.

Finally, Chrome also lets you just sign in to immediately access your synced bookmarks, history, and other settings from any device. Also, similar to Firefox Quantum, it has add-ons and extensions, as well as the Chrome Web Store for finding all these installable goodies.

Read also:Mozilla Firefox 48 now out with multi-process electrolysis to cut lag

firefox-quantam-vs-google-chrome.png

Is it worth getting used to a new browser when they might seem to be roughly equal competitors?

Test it yourself

Putting aside design (since that's all subjective), it comes down to speed and features when pitting Firefox Quantum and Chrome against each other. As we said earlier, a lot of the data seems to suggest Firefox Quantum is faster, but some synthetic benchmark tests do indicate this is negligible in the real world. In other words, the two browsers might feel equally fast, but they shouldn't be equally as intensive on your machine. A couple dozen Chrome tabs can bring even the most spec'd-out consumer computer to a halt, while in Firefox Quantum, in our experience, you can have 30 to 40 tabs open and not feel a bit of lag.

It's something worth testing yourself, because Americans spend more than 10 hours a day looking at a screen, per Nielsen research. If that's you, and the bulk of those hours are on a web browser, you really should be using the speediest, most efficient browser, even if that means having to get used to a whole new one.

Which browser would work best for which type of person and why?

Browser wars

Chrome may have won the browser wars way back when, but as history has shown, it's possible to lose your crown. While Chrome has been comfortably hitting the snooze button for the past couple years, Firefox quantum-leaped ahead (see what we did there?).

Mozilla now likely hopes Firefox Quantum will allow it to regain the ground it lost to Chrome, though it faces some daunting challenges, including the fact that Chrome is the default browser for Android devices, and Safari is the default browser for Mac and iOS devices, and Microsoft Edge is the default browser for Windows 10 devices.

Also, ultimately, switching browsers is a pain. There's a learning curve, if not a behavioral one. But, as far we can tell, there is not much you can do in Chrome that you can't do in Firefox Quantum. It's therefore difficult to say what type of person should use which browser. You really need to think about whether you're married to Google's ecosystem, whether Chrome is currently a hog on your system, and whether you're even willing to explore another option. Answer those essential questions -- and you'll know which browser is better, or at least best for you.

Previous and related coverage

Firefox Quantum: million installs so far

Firefox sees a bump in installs from Chrome users after the big Quantum overhaul.

Just how fast is Firefox Quantum?

Can Mozilla's new Firefox Quantum browser unseat Google Chrome as the fastest browser?

Think Firefox Quantum is fast? Try Firefox 58, out this week

The incoming Firefox 58 brings faster page loads thanks to a new compiler and streaming compilation, reports Mozilla.

Related Topics:

Google Cloud Internet of Things Security Data Centers Sours: https://www.zdnet.com/article/firefox-quantum-vs-chrome-are-tides-shifting/
Chrome vs Firefox 2017 / 2018 - Just How Similar Are They?

The web browser is by far the most important piece of software on your PC—at least for most users. Unless you’re at a workstation crunching numbers or editing the next Star Wars you probably spend the majority of your computer time staring at a web app or a website.

That’s why it’s important to make sure you’ve always got the best tool for the job, and in that does not include Internet Explorer. If you still want the built-in option for Windows that would be Edge, but it’s hard to stick strictly with Edge when you’ve got other choices including Google’s Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Opera.

Let’s take a look at the four major (and modern) browsers to see how they stack up in

(If none of these internet browsers strike your fancy, head over to PCWorld's roundup of 10 intriguing alternative browsers.)

Browsers in brief

Chrome

chromelogoGoogle

The current people’s champion, Google Chrome tops the metrics charts of both StatCounter and NetMarketShare by a huge margin. Google’s browser has built a dedicated fan base thanks to its massive extensions library, and the fact that it just gets out of your way to put the focus on web content, not the browser’s trimmings.

Chrome isn’t quite as simplistic as it once was, but it’s still very easy to use. There isn’t much to Chrome except a huge URL bar—known as the OmniBar—plus a space for extensions, a bookmarking icon, tabs, and that’s it.

Yet Google still finds a way to hide all kinds of features inside the browser, including deep integration with Google’s services. This allows you to sync your bookmarks, passwords, open tabs, and more across devices. Chrome also has multi-account support if you need it on a family machine, a built-in PDF viewer, built-in Google Translate functionality, a task manager, and the always handy Paste and go context menu item.

If there’s one complaint people have about Chrome it’s that the browser eats up available memory. Our browser testing in showed that Chrome was definitely a memory beast, but two years later it fared pretty well in our tests.

Firefox

mozilla firefox logoMozilla

For users who love extensibility but want greater privacy than a Google-made browser can provide, the open source Mozilla Firefox is your best bet. Firefox paved the way for other browsers to become extensible, and while Firefox’s add-on catalog is pretty good, it now pales in comparison to the Chrome Web Store. Like Google, Firefox has a sync feature.

Where Firefox has really shined in recent years is with the browser’s incognito mode. All browsers have a private mode that lets you browse without any of your activity being logged in your saved history. But most of the time these private modes still allow websites to track your activity for that specific session. Firefox does away with this by including an ad and tracker blocker when using incognito mode.

Opera

operabrowserOpera

Before Chrome, Opera was a popular choice among power users—a position former Opera CEO Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner is trying to take back with Vivaldi. Opera today is really one of the more under-rated browsers around. It’s based on the same core technologies as Chrome (the Blink rendering engine and the JavaScript V8 engine), which means it can run many Chrome extensions—there’s even an extension for installing extensions from the Chrome Web Store.

Opera’s also got a few unusual features like Turbo, which saves on load times and bandwidth by compressing webpages on Opera’s servers. It’s also got a nice security feature called domain highlighting that hides most of the URL so that users can see easily and clearly if they’re on Google.com or google.com.scam.com—with scam.com being the actual website.

More recently, Opera introduced its own take on the social sidebar with one-click access to services such as WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, and Telegram. Like Chrome and Firefox, Opera also has its own cross-device syncing feature.

Microsoft Edge

microsotedgeMicrosoft

Microsoft Edge is still a work in progress. You'll see below that its performance is getting better, but that’s not all there is to the browser in The Edge extensions library is tiny, its sync functionality is near nonexistent, and it doesn’t get updates nearly fast enough—though that is expected to change with the Fall Creators Update.

Despite its shortcomings, Edge has several helpful features that will appeal to some. Edge is deeply integrated with Windows 10’s inking capabilities, as well as with OneNote, making it easy to clip a webpage, annotate it, and save it to a notebook. Cortana is also a big part of Edge. You can use Microsoft’s digital assistant to quickly search for information, compare prices, or get a quick calculation.

Like Chrome, Edge has a casting feature. There’s also a nifty set-aside tabs feature to stash a collection of websites, the ability to read ebooks (great for tablets), and an MSN.com-ish new-tab page.

Read on for our benchmark results and our pick for best browser.

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Sours: https://db5hnvpcdhbsn.cloudfront.net/article//best-web-browserschrome-edge-firefox-opera-go-head-to-head/

You will also be interested:

Usage share of web browsers

Relative market adoption of web browsers

The most used web browsers per country in November [1]
Usage share of web browsers in November according to StatCounter
Yearly usage share of web browsers from to November according to StatCounter

The usage share of web browsers is the proportion, often expressed as a percentage, of visitors to a group of web sites that use a particular web browser.

Accuracy[edit]

Measuring browser usage in the number of requests (page hits) made by each user agent can be misleading.

Overestimation[edit]

Not all requests are generated by a user, as a user agent can make requests at regular time intervals without user input. In this case, the user's activity might be overestimated. Some examples:

  • Certain anti-virus products fake their user agent string to appear to be popular browsers. This is done to trick attack sites that might display clean content to the scanner, but not to the browser.The Register reported in June that traffic from AVG Linkscanner, using an IE6 user agent string, outstripped human link clicks by nearly 10 to 1.[2]
  • A user who revisits a site shortly after changing or upgrading browsers may be double-counted under some methods; overall numbers at the time of a new version's release may be skewed.[3]
  • Occasionally websites are written in such a way that they effectively block certain browsers. One common reason for this is that the website has been tested to work with only a limited number of browsers, and so the site owners enforce that only tested browsers are allowed to view the content, while all other browsers are sent a "failure" message, and instruction to use another browser.[4] Many of the untested browsers may still be otherwise capable of rendering the content. Sophisticated users who are aware of this may then "spoof" the user agent string in order to gain access to the site.
  • Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Opera will, under some circumstances, fetch resources before they need to render them, so that the resources can be used faster if they are needed. This technique, prerendering or pre-loading, may inflate the statistics for the browsers using it because of pre-loading of resources which are not used in the end.[5]

Underestimation[edit]

It is also possible to underestimate the usage share by using the number of requests, for example:

  • Firefox (and other Gecko-based browsers) and later versions use fast Document Object Model (DOM) caching. JavaScript is executed on page load only from net or disk cache, but not if it is loaded from DOM cache. This can affect JavaScript-based tracking of browser statistics.[6]
  • While most browsers generate additional page hits by refreshing web pages when the user navigates back through page history, some browsers (such as Opera) reuse cached content without resending requests to the server.[7][8]
  • Generally, the more faithfully a browser implements HTTP's cache specifications, the more it will be under-reported relative to browsers that implement those specifications poorly.[8]
  • Browser users may run site, cookie and JavaScript blockers which cause those users to be under-counted. For example, common AdBlock blocklists such as EasyBlock include sites such as StatCounter in their privacy lists, and NoScript blocks all JavaScript by default. The Firefox Add-ons website reports million users of AdBlock variants and million users of NoScript.
  • Users behind a caching proxy (e.g. Squid) may have repeat requests for certain pages served to the browser from the cache, rather than retrieving it again via the Internet.

User agent spoofing[edit]

Websites often include code to detect browser version to adjust the page design sent according to the user agent string received. This may mean that less-popular browsers are not sent complex content (even though they might be able to deal with it correctly) or, in extreme cases, refused all content.[9] Thus, various browsers have a feature to cloak or spoof their identification to force certain server-side content.

  • Default user agent strings of most browsers have pieces of strings from one or more other browsers, so that if the browser is unknown to a website, it can be identified as one of those. For example, Safari has not only "Mozilla/", but also "KHTML" (from which Safari's WebKit was forked) and "Gecko" (the engine of Firefox).
  • Some Linux browsers such as GNOME Web identify themselves as Safari in order to aid compatibility.[10][11]

Differences in measurement[edit]

Net Applications, in their NetMarketShare report, uses unique visitors to measure web usage.[12] The effect is that users visiting a site ten times will only be counted once by these sources, while they are counted ten times by statistics companies that measure page hits.

Net Applications uses country-level weighting as well.[13] The goal of weighting countries based on their usage is to mitigate selection area based sampling bias. This bias is caused by the differences in the percentage of tracked hits in the sample, and the percentage of global usage tracked by third party sources. This difference is caused by the heavier levels of market usage.[14]

Statistics from the United States government's Digital Analytics Program (DAP) do not represent world-wide usage patterns. DAP uses raw data from a unified Google Analytics account.

Summary tables[edit]

The following tables summarize the usage share of all browsers for the indicated months.

Crossover to smartphones having majority share[edit]

See also: Usage share of operating systems §&#;Crossover to smartphones having majority share

According to StatCounter web use statistics (a proxy for all use), in the week from 7–13 November , "mobile" (meaning smartphones) alone (without tablets) overtook desktop for the first time and by the end of the year smartphones were in the majority. Since 27 October, the desktop has not shown a majority, even on weekdays.

Previously, according to StatCounter press release, the world has turned into a desktop-minority;[27] as of October&#;[update], there was about 49% of desktop usage for that month. The two biggest continents, Asia and Africa, have been a mobile-majority for a while, and Australia is by now desktop-minority too.[28][29] A few countries in Europe and South America have also followed this trend of being mobile-majority.

In March , for the first time in the US the number of mobile-only adult internet users exceeded the number of desktop-only internet users with % of the digital population only using mobile compared to % only using desktop; this also means the majority, 78%, use both desktop and mobile to access the internet.[30]

Older reports (–)[edit]

StatCounter (Jan to October )[edit]

StatCounter statistics are directly derived from hits (not unique visitors) from 3 million sites using StatCounter totaling more than 15 billion hits per month.[31] No weightings are used.

W3Counter (May to March )[edit]

This site counts the last 15, page views from each of approximately 80, websites. This limits the influence of sites with more than 15, monthly visitors on the usage statistics. W3Counter is not affiliated with the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Net Applications (May to November )[edit]

Net Applications bases its usage share on statistics from 40, websites having around million unique visitors per month. The mean site has unique visitors per day.

Wikimedia (April to March )[edit]

Usage in Wikimedia during

Wikimedia traffic analysis reports are based on server logs of about 4 billion page requests per month, based on the user agent information that accompanied the requests.[32] These server logs cover requests to all the Wikimedia Foundation projects, including Wikipedia, Wikimedia Commons, Wiktionary, Wikibooks, Wikiquote, Wikisource, Wikinews, Wikiversity and others.[33]

Note: Wikimedia has recently[when?] had a large percentage of unrecognised browsers, previously counted as Firefox, that are now assumed to be Internet Explorer 11 fixed in the February and later numbers. And February numbers include mobile for Internet Explorer and Firefox (not included in Android). Chrome did not include the mobile numbers at that time while Android does since there was an "Android browser" that was the default browser at that time.

Clicky (September to August )[edit]

StatOwl.com (September to November )[edit]

92% of sites monitored by StatOwl serve predominantly United States market.[34]

AT Internet Institute (Europe, July to June )[edit]

AT Internet Institute was formerly known as XiTi.

Method: Only counts visits to local sites in 23 European countries and then averages the percentages for those 23 European countries independent of population size.

TheCounter.com ( to )[edit]

TheCounter.com identifies sixteen versions of six browsers (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, Opera, Netscape, and Konqueror). Other browsers are categorised as either "Netscape compatible" (including Google Chrome, which may also be categorized as "Safari" because of its "Webkit" subtag) or "unknown". Internet Explorer 8 is identified as Internet Explorer 7. Monthly data includes all hits from until the end of the month concerned. More than the exact browser type, this data identifies the underlying rendering engine used by various browsers, and the table below aggregates them in the same column.

OneStat.com (April to March )[edit]

ADTECH (Europe, to )[edit]

[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_share_of_web_browsers


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