Army reserve eod units

Army reserve eod units DEFAULT

Explosive ordnance disposal (United States Navy)

US Navy personnel who render safe or detonate unexploded ordnance

Military unit

United States Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians render safe all types of ordnance, including improvised, chemical, biological, and nuclear. They perform land and underwater location, identification, render-safe, and recovery (or disposal) of foreign and domestic ordnance. They conduct demolition of hazardous munitions, pyrotechnics, and retrograde explosives using detonation and burning techniques. They forward deploy and fully integrate with the various Combatant Commanders, Special Operations Forces (SOF), and various warfare units within the Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Army. They are also called upon to support military and civilian law enforcement agencies, as well as the Secret Service.

EOD Technicians' missions take them to all environments, and every climate, in every part of the world. They have many assets available to arrive to their mission, from open- and closed-circuit scuba and surface supplied diving rigs, to parachute insertion from fixed-wing aircraft and fast-rope, abseil, and Special Patrol Insertion/Extraction (SPIE) from rotary aircraft, to small boats and tracked vehicles.

History[edit]

Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal teams trace their history back to the first group of volunteers selected to work with the famed British UXO teams, following the initial GermanBlitzkrieg attacks in early In June , these veterans returned to form the first class in what was originally named the Mine Recovery School. Officers and enlisted personnel entered the eleven-week school, qualifying as Mine Recovery Personnel/Second Class Divers. Between June and October , nineteen classes graduated and deployed throughout the Pacific and Mediterranean theaters. Divided into Mobile Explosive Investigative Units (MEIU) they were instrumental in the clearance of explosive hazards both on land and at sea. The Korean War saw a return to action on various minesweepers ensuring the continual clearance of shipping hazards. Additionally, the now renamed Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Units took part in inland intelligence operations and interacted with ground-based units in Inchon, Wonson and throughout the United Nations Theater of operations.

The Vietnam War saw an increase in overall participation by EOD units. Units from EOD Group Pacific, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii deployed throughout the region. EODGRUPAC was composed of Mobile Unit, Shipboard Unit and Training and Evaluation Unit personnel. Deployed teams onboard ships at sea were composed of one officer and two enlisted men. Teams in-country were larger and were based from the Mekong Delta (RIVFLOT 1) to DaNang. With an overall emphasis in sea and riverine mine clearance operations, these teams ensured the continued safety for shipping and maritime operations.

Since the close of the Vietnam War, the changing world situation and increased operational tasking have prompted the expansion of EOD units in number, size and capabilities. Their record in recent history includes the Gulf War where EOD Technicians cleared in excess of naval mines. EOD was the critical element in eliminating unexploded ordnance from the USS&#;Stark&#;(FFG) after two Exocetanti-ship missiles fired from an Iraqi aircraft hit her. EOD developed render safe procedures on-site to prevent a catastrophe. During joint operations in Somalia, Haiti, Bosnia, and Kosovo, EOD provided safety and operational continuity by eliminating booby traps, weapons caches, and performing mine clearance operations. EOD units are presently serving in Afghanistan and Iraq where they are supporting the global war against terrorism, destroying tons of post war ordnance and reducing the threat imposed by Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) that have plagued both countries. Forward deployed and fully integrated within the various Special Operations units within the U.S. Navy and Army, the present day EOD technician has changed greatly from that first Mine Recovery class of But one thing that has never changed is the level of professionalism and dedication that has been the cornerstone of the program.

Training[edit]

The EOD training pipeline starts with three weeks of preparatory training at Naval Station Great Lakes, Illinois. The candidate will work on swim stroke development, long range swims and physical conditioning. EOD candidates will then attend an additional 51 weeks of rigorous training. Their training starts with nine weeks of dive school held at the Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center (NDSTC) in Panama City, Florida. Besides learning how to dive, candidates learn about the various kinds of equipment and dive physics. After successful completion of dive school, candidates transfer to Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School at Eglin Air Force Base in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. This training is broken down into specific types of ordnance:[2]

Demolition Division
Includes how to set up various explosive firing trains
Tools & Methods Division
Teaches you the various tools and methods of EOD work
Core Division
Teaches basic fundamentals of EOD work
Ground Ordnance Division
Focuses on projected munitions and grenades
Air Ordnance Division
Focuses on bombs and missiles
Improvised Explosive Device
Includes "homemade bombs”
Bio/Chem Division
Includes lessons on various biological and chemical agents
Nuclear Ordnance Division
Covers basic nuclear physics and radiation monitoring and decontamination procedures
Underwater Ordnance Division
Emphasizes torpedoes and other underwater explosives as well as underwater search techniques

Every section teaches how to render-safe or defuse ordnance.

Member of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Five jumps from a CHusing a MCC parachute

Upon completion of basic EOD training, all graduates will attend the three-week Basic Airborne Course at Fort Benning, Georgia where candidates qualify as a basic parachutist.

After Jump School, training continues at Gulfport, Mississippi, for an additional four weeks, consisting of weapons training in the use of the 9mm handgun and the M-4 carbine as well as combat first aid.

The final phase of EOD training is three weeks of EOD Tactical Training at the Naval Amphibious Base in San Diego. This will consist of helicopter insertion (fast-rope, rappel, cast and SPIE), small arms/weapons training, small unit tactics (weapons, self-defense, land navigation, and patrolling), and tactical communications (satellite and high frequency). Upon completion of the EOD training, graduates are assigned to EOD Mobile Units where they gain advanced on-the-job training and experience as members of Combat Expeditionary Support (CES) platoons/companies, Carrier and Expeditionary Strike Group platoons, SOF Companies, and Marine Mammal Companies.

Officer training[edit]

Officer training for the EOD career field (x / x) differs slightly. Their pipeline is as follows:[3]

  • EOD Junior Officer Course (7 days, Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center) – This course trains junior officers in EOD group, mobile unit, and detachment/small unit organization to include organizational relationships with detachments/small units, small group dynamics, CPO/OIC relationships, ethics, and EOD case studies.[4]
  • Diver Training (60 days, Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center) – Designed to provide qualified non-diving personnel with the basic training necessary to safely and effectively perform as a dive team member/diver in SCUBA and MK UBA in accordance with the U.S. Navy Diving Manual.[5]
  • EOD School ( days, Naval School Explosive Ordnance Disposal) (see enlisted training)
  • Basic Airborne (23 days, Fort Benning) (see enlisted training)
  • Expeditionary Combat Skills (27 days, Center for Security Forces)[6]
  • EOD Tactical Training (21 days, EOD Training and Evaluation Unit ONE, San Diego)[7] (See enlisted training)
  • EOD Platoon Leader Course (12 days)

Advanced training opportunities include foreign language, Advanced Improvised Explosive Device Disposal, and Department of Energy training.

Advanced equipment[edit]

EOD employs a variety of tools, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) to accomplish the mission. Robots are used to perform remote procedures on unexploded ordnance and improvised explosive devices. Efforts to maintain the latest technology are accomplished with the assistance and the DoE and various civilian organizations. Johns Hopkins University maintains the Advanced Explosive Ordnance Disposal Robotic System (AEODRS) program. The primary goal of AEODRS is to develop a common architecture for a family of unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) systems to enable unprecedented levels of interoperability.[8] AEODRS is a Joint Service Explosive Ordnance Disposal (JSEOD) program, executed through the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division (NAVEODTECHDIV) via the Navy Program Management Office for Explosive Ordnance Disposal/Counter Remote Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare (PMS).[8]

Units[edit]

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Group One[edit]

Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, California

  • EOD Mobile Unit ONE, Naval Base Point Loma, California
  • EOD Mobile Unit THREE, Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, California
  • EOD Mobile Unit FIVE, Naval Base Guam
  • EOD Mobile Unit ELEVEN, Imperial Beach, California
  • EOD Training and Evaluation Unit (TEU) ONE, Naval Base Point Loma, California
  • Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) ONE, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
  • EOD Expeditionary Support Unit One, Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, California
  • EOD Operational Support Unit SEVEN, Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, California (decommissioned)

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Group Two[edit]

Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek, Virginia

  • EOD Mobile Unit TWO, Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek, Virginia
  • EOD Mobile Unit SIX, Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek, Virginia
  • EOD Mobile Unit EIGHT, Naval Station Rota Spain, Spain
  • EOD Mobile Unit TWELVE, Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek, Virginia
  • EOD Expeditionary Support Unit TWO, Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek, Virginia
  • EOD Training and Evaluation Unit (TEU) TWO, Joint Expeditionary Base East, Virginia[9]
  • Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) TWO, Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek, Virginia

Expeditionary Exploitation Unit ONE, Indian Head, Maryland[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Edison, Capt. Edward (). "Explosive Ordnance Disposal: Clearing the Way"(PDF). U.S. Navy Expeditionary Combat Command. Archived from the original(PDF) on 25 July Retrieved 19 February
  2. ^"Explosive Ordnance Disposal"(fact sheet). United States Navy. Retrieved 27 February [permanent dead link]
  3. ^"EOD Officer Career Path"(PDF). United States Navy. Retrieved 21 April
  4. ^"EOD Junior Officer Course". United States Navy. Archived from the original on 22 April Retrieved 21 April
  5. ^"EOD "A" School Phase One". United States Navy. Archived from the original on 22 April Retrieved 21 April
  6. ^"Expeditionary Warefare". United States Navy. Retrieved 21 April
  7. ^"NAVY EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE". United States Navy. Archived from the original on 19 February Retrieved 21 April
  8. ^ abHinton, Mark A.; Burck, James M.; Collins, Kristine R.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Tunstel Jr, Edward W.; Zeher, Michael J. (). "Integration of Advanced Explosive Ordnance Disposal Robotic Systems Within a Modular Open Systems Architecture"(PDF). Volume 32, Number 3. JOHNS HOPKINS APL TECHNICAL DIGEST.
  9. ^Barber, Barrie (12 June ). "Expeditionary Sailors Defuse Mock IEDs, Prep for Upcoming Deployments". United States Navy.

External links[edit]

Public Domain&#;This article incorporates&#;public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Navy.

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Explosive_ordnance_disposal_(United_States_Navy)
EOD Troops Begin Middle East Tour in Kuwait

New York Army National Guard Lt. Col. Doug Baker, left, and Master Sgt. Todd Monroe unfurl the colors of the st Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) during their transfer of authority ceremony held in Kuwait, July 22, The st Ordnance Battalion and its 23 Soldiers serve as the command and control element for Task Force Hellhound, the forward deployed EOD task force responsible for military EOD forces, forensic exploitation and civilians across U.S. Central Command supporting Operations Spartan Shield, Inherent Resolve and Freedom's Sentinel, replacing members of the Alabama National Guards st Ordnance Battalion (EOD). The force conducts operations to detect, identify, render safe and dispose of conventional and improvised weapons, explosives and weapons of mass destruction to protect coalition and partner force members and civilians. Courtesy photo.

Jul 30,

New Commander for st Ordnance Battalion

GLENVILLE--Major Doug Baker ( right) the incoming commander of the New York Army National Guards st Ordnance Battalion ( Explosive Ordnance Disposal) receives the unit colors from Col. Michael Fowler the commander of the rd Troop Command during change-of-command ceremonies on Saturday June 8 at the Glenville Armed Forces Reserve Center in Glenville N.Y. Baker a veteran of the Iraq War and campaign against the Islamic State is a Porters Corner resident.

Jun 11,

NY National Guard unit takes over Afghan EOD

BAGRAM, AFGHANISTAN-- The incoming command team from the New York Army National Guards st Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Maj. Robert Crudden and Command Sgt. Maj. Kevin Conklin uncased the organization colors at the Transfer of Authority ceremony on Thursday, March 29th, at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan. The st Ordnance Battalion (EOD) sent 19 Soldiers to Afghanistan where they are responsible for overseeing Explosive Ordnance Disposal units-- both American and Coalition-- throughout the country.

Apr 03,

Soldiers deploying to Afghanistan

GLENVILLE-- Soldiers of the st Ordnance Battalion (EOD) of the New York Army National Guard in formation during a mobilization ceremony held on Sunday Feb. 25 at the Armed Forces Reserve Center in Glenville N.Y. The st Ordnance Battalion (EOD) is sending 19 Soldiers to Afghanistan where they will be responsible for overseeing Explosive Ordnance Disposal units-- both American and Coalition-- throughout the country.

Feb 26,

Soldiers compete to be the best

GLENVILLE-- New York Army National Guard Sgt. Kevin Baker, assigned to the th Medium Truck Company, and Spc. John Iseman, assigned to the th Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD), high-five during a 10k ruck march for the Best Warrior Competition, in Glenville, N.Y., Oct. 22nd, Baker and Iseman were competing to complete the ruck march in the fastest time possible, for the st EOD Battalion Best Warrior Competition.

Oct 27,

New commander for st

GLENVILLE--New York Army National Guard Major Henry Padley, receives the colors of the st Ordnance (EOD) Battalion from Col. Michael Fowler Commander of the rd Troop Command in Glenville N.Y. Oct. 21 The handing over of the flag is symbolic of the official change of command within the battalion.

Oct 23,

National Guard EOD Battalion HQ Changes Leaders

New York Army National Guard Col. James Freehart transfers the unit guidon to Lt. Col. Jason Souza signifying the transfer of command of the st Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) during a ceremony, Oct. 17 at the Armed Forces Readiness Center in Scotia-Glenville. Souza last served as served in the st EOD Battalion as the Battalion Operations Officer and the 53rd Troop Command as the Assistant Operations Officer. Photo by Sgt. Maj. Corine Lombardo, New York National Guard.

Oct 18,

NY Guard Soldier Competes in Best Warrior Event

CONCORD, Massachusetts-- New York Army National Guard Spec. Michael Rowland a member of the st Ordnance Battalion runs over the historic Old North Bridge here on May 15, as the Army National Guard&#;s Northeast Best Warrior Competition wrapped up. Rowland and Staff Sgt. Christian Hager, a member of Company A, 2nd Battalion th Infantry represented New York at the eight-state event held May at Camp Edwards, Massachusetts. The Old North Bridge marks the spot at which Massachusetts militia members fired back at British soldiers on April 19,

May 20,

EOD Battalion Changes Commanders

STRATTON AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE-- New York Army National Guard Lt. Col. Andrew Caliendo accepts the colors of the st Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) from Col. Jim Pabis, commander of the rd Troop Command, during Change-of-Command Ceremonies here on Saturday, Oct. Caliendo took over command of the battalion from Lt. Col. Rob Mitchell.

Oct 23,

Soldier Shares Honor With Loved One

STRATTON AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Scotia, NY -- Captain Mark Stetzko, an explosive ordnance officer with the st Ordnance Battalion pins a National Guard lapel pin on his fiancée Laura Zadzilka during his unit’s Freedom Salute ceremony here on Jan Stetzko returned from Iraq with his unit on Oct

Jan 21,

st Ordnance Battalion Homecoming

GLENVILLE-- Lt. Col. Rob Mitchell, commander of the st Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) hugs a family member after the unit returned from its deployment in Iraq on Saturday, Oct. The st Soldiers spent 10 months in Basra, Iraq, overseeing counter-IED operations in southern Iraq.

Oct 16,

New York Guardsmen Honor Fallen EOD Soldiers

BASRA, Iraq-- New York Army National Guard Major James Wood, Operations Officer for the st Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordinance Disposal) reads the names and biographies of EOD Soldiers who gave their lives during operations in during a memorial service held at the chapel here on May 7. The st, based in Scotia, NY is in command of EOD Soldiers operating in Southern Iraq in support of Operation New Dawn.

May 16,

Soldiers Say Hi From Iraq on the Jumbotron

ALBANY--New York Army National Guard Soldiers from the st Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) say hi to their families and fans of the Albany Devils hockey team on Sunday April 3 via a live TV feed from Iraq. The Soldiers, based at the Armed Forces Reserve Center in Scotia, are supporting explosive ordnance disposal operations in southern Iraq as part of operation New Dawn. The Albany Devils hosted the families of the Deployed Guardsmen for the special military appreciation night.

Apr 06,

St. Patrick’s Day In Iraq

BASRA, IRAQ- Members of the New York Army National Guard’s st Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) get together with members of the Texas Army National Guard’s 36th Division to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at Contingency Operating Base Basra. The New York Soldiers celebrated St. Patrick’s Day in Iraq while their colleagues in the 1st Battalion 69th Infantry marched in the annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade in New York City. The st is serving as the headquarters for Task Force Troy-South, with a mission of clearing improvised explosive devices from critical routes and infrastructure.

Mar 17,

New York EOD Soldiers Demonstrate Skills to Boss

BASRA, Iraq-- Soldiers of the New York Army National Guard’s st Ordnance Battalion ( Explosive Ordnance Disposal) help Texas Army National Guard Major General Eddy Spurgin, the commander of the 36 Division and Task Force Troy, don the the suit EOD technicians wear when they are on a mission. The general was visiting the battalion, which provides support for his task force, on Feb. 3.

Feb 18,

st EOD Operating in Basra

BASRA, Iraq--Lt. Col. Robert Mitchell, the commander of the Scotia-based st Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) poses next to the battalion’s headquarters sign here. The New York National Guard battalion is responsible for counter IED operations and training Iraqi Police counter-explosives teams as the headquarters of Task Force Troy-South. The 38 members of the units have a wide range of skills ranging from explosives experts to intelligence analysis and supply management.

Jan 18,

st Family Farewell

SCOTIA--New York Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Shawn Nethaway and his family watch the activities at the farewell ceremony for the st Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) held on Monday, Oct. 25 at Stratton Air National Guard Base here. The st will deploy to Iraq in support of Operation New Dawn.

Oct 25,

Troops Train for Iraq Deployment

Soldiers from the st Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Battalion practice urban assault tactics during their pre-mobilization training Aug. 8, at Fort Drum, N.Y. The unit is preparing to mobilize and deploy to Iraq later this year.

Aug 12,

EOD Defeats IED's with Robot's Reach

Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Joseph Ching, Space and Naval Warfare , from San Diego, Calif. prepares the Talon Mark 4 Explosive Ordnance Disposal robot for a demonstration June 19, The robot is used to investigate and destroy improvised explosive devises in Iraq and Afghanistan. Ching is part of an active-duty ordance training team visiting Camp Smith to provide training for New York's st EOD Battalion and th EOD company, both headquartered in Schenectady.

Jun 19,

Sours: https://dmna.ny.gov/units/?unit=&page=featured
  1. Fall guys memes
  2. 2005 cadillac cts stereo
  3. Spongebob time meme
  4. Montclair graduate programs
  5. Anti seizure medications

EOD & Search

Royal Engineer jobs

This is available as a full time Army role.

This is available as a part time Army role.

Back to role results

IT'S AN EXCITING AND INTERESTING JOB GIVING ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE A GENUINE DIFFERENCE AND HELP PROTECT PEOPLE

As an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) and Search operator you'll be on your journey towards becoming a bomb disposal and high risk search expert for the Royal Engineers. Whether helping to make safe a World War II bomb found in a back garden, or locating and destroying improvised explosive devices (IEDs) on operations, you'll be working as part of a highly skilled EOD and Search team. We'll teach you everything you need to know to help you start your specialisation in this field. You'll also be part of a friendly Sapper family, enjoying sports, Adventure Training and more.
  • EOD & Search is part of the Trade Roles of the Royal Engineers. All the Royal Engineer soldier job roles are divided into 5 groups. When you apply to the Engineers, you will apply to the trade group rather than the specific trade. More about types of roles in the Royal Engineers.
  • Study explosives and their properties
  • Learn how to locate and safely dispose of IEDs and manufactured munitions
  • Learn how to use specialised equipment including bomb disposal robots

 

Step 1
You'll start with your initial military training which will teach you how to be a soldier - this will cover everything from fieldcraft to weapon handling. If you join as a Junior Soldier (under 17 years 5 months), you'll complete a week basic military training course at Harrogate. If you join as a Regular Soldier (over 17 years 1 month), you'll complete the regular week adult basic training.

Step 2
Then it's off to the Royal School of Military Engineering Regiment near Camberley for nine weeks. Here, you learn military engineering skills such as field fortifications, demolition, mine warfare and bridge building. Finally, you go to the Defence EOD, Munitions and Search Training Regiment, Bicester for 7 weeks. Here you will specialise in EOD and Search.

Age: 16 years 6 months - 35 years 6 months

Qualifications: GCSE Grade A–D/ in at least English Language, Maths and one other subject

Fitness:
  • Mid Thigh Pull 50kg
  • Medicine Ball Throw 3m
  • 2km run 11m
  • MSFT (beep test) level
More information about the fitness test
  • Level 2 & 3 City and Guilds working in High Risk confined spaces (water)
  • Level 3 City and Guilds in emergency rescue and recovery of casualties from confined spaces (water)

Learn about rank progression here.

Earn £15, during training. When you have completed 26 week’s service or finished basic trade training – whichever comes first, your pay will rise to £20,

One of the best things about working in EOD & Search is that every job is different. There's always a new problem to solve; and you have to find the right solution. What I do with my team saves lives.

Once your online application has been approved, you'll meet with a local recruiter. This is your chance to tell us about the role that you're interested in. When you go to the Assessment Centre,you'll take tests - the results will show whether you'd be suitable for this role, or should consider a different role.

Step 1
Even as a potential Royal Engineer, you'll start with your initial military training which will teach you how to be a soldier - this will cover everything from first aid to weapon handling and shooting. This will be challenging as you will be required to push your limits, often in the field. It will develop your team work, build confidence and build on your personal fitness. Various options for attendance and completion are available.

Step 2
Then it's off to the Royal School of Military Engineering Regiment near Camberley. Here, you learn military engineering skills and complete the 2 week Reservist Combat Engineer Foundation course. This course teaches you engineering skills that you will call upon throughout your career.

Step 3
Finally, you go to the Defence EOD, Munitions and Search Training Regiment, Bicester for 2 weeks. This is where you will train to become a specialist EOD&S Team member.

All of the above training is delivered at a pace to suit your availability and it will be a two way partnership with guidance from your Unit training team.

Age: 17 years 9 months - 42 years 6 months

Fitness:
  • Mid Thigh Pull 50kg
  • Medicine Ball Throw 3m
  • 2km run 11m
  • MSFT (beep test) level
More information about the fitness test

Qualifications: No previous experience or formal qualifications are required, however you will be assessed on your numeracy and literacy. You will also undertake a trainability test to identify your suitability for this technical role.

  • Junior Management Qualifications
  • Army Physical Training Instructor
  • Adventurous Training Instructor Qualifications

You'll get paid a day rate for every period of training you attend according to your rank, starting from £ in training and rising to £ per day once you're a Sapper (Royal Engineer Private). This includes being paid for weekly training nights & a travelling allowance. Plus, if you complete all of your annual training days (27 days per year), you're entitled to a tax-free lump sum called a bounty.

More about Reserve benefits

"One of the best things about working in EOD & Search is that every job is different. You are a soldier, a Combat Engineer and EOS&S specialist all rolled into one. With such variety there's always a new problem to solve; and you have to find the right solution. What I do with my team saves lives."

Once your online application has been approved, you'll meet with a local Army Reserve recruiter. This is your chance to tell us about the role that you're interested in and allow us to assist you with your preparation. When you go to the Assessment Centre, you'll take some tests to assess your suitability for the chosen role - the results will show whether you'd be suitable for this role, or should consider a different role.

There is only ONE Reserve Explosive Ordnance Disposal & Search Regiment, this is (City of London) Engineer Regiment (EOD&S). with Sub-Units around the UK.

Contact us by email: [email protected]

Find out more or contact your local EOD & Search Reserve Unit:

RHQ & Field Squadron (EOD&S) – Catford & Bexleyheath

Field Squadron (EOD&S) – East London & Essex

Field Squadron (EOD&S) – Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire

Field Squadron (EOD&S) – Tunbridge Wells, Redhill & Rochester

Sours: https://apply.army.mod.uk/roles/royal-engineers/eod-and-search

st blasts through world's largest EOD exercise

Story by
Staff Sgt. Melissa Harvey
st Fighter Wing Public Affairs

NAVAL AIR STATION FORT WORTH JOINT RESERVE BASE, Texas -- Explosive ordnance disposal technicians with the st Fighter Wing here took part in the first of a series of EOD exercises billed as the largest in the world.

Raven’s Challenge X kicked off April at Fort Wolters, Texas, one of four locations for this year’s exercise.

With more than 1, participants, it is now the world's largest exercise of its kind, according to organizers.

Sponsored by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives National Center for Explosives Training and Research, the annual exercises brings military EOD technicians and public safety bomb squads together to perform counter-improvised explosive device operations in a realistic environment.

Tech. Sgt. Joseph Lagrone, st EOD technician and exercise controller, explained the importance of this kind of training.

“For these guys to get this kind of training is invaluable,” he said. “To work with public safety bomb squad guys and see the different tactics they bring to the table…it’s invaluable.”

EOD technicians were run through a gauntlet of training scenarios including vehicle-borne, cabin and passenger bus IED situations, among others.

The newest Airman to the unit, Senior Airman Ryan Wilson, an EOD apprentice, participated in the exercise with a team comprised of st EOD and Army technicians.

“It’s a lot different training than we usually get, because we have more resources convening in one place and time,” Wilson said. “It [the exercise] puts out new crisis scenarios that we haven’t run across yet.”

When a real-world situation occurs, the st EOD, which area of responsibility covers 62, square miles in Texas, may need to collaborate with other agencies, such as a local bomb squad or the Federal Bureau of Investigation, depending on the situation.

“They see out of country, we see in country,” Ricky Hendrix from the Plano Police Department Bomb Squad said.” Communications have changed over the years where it is just an internet site away from seeing people build things here the military has seen out of country, so it [collaboration] is critical for us.”

Lilla Pistorio, a management and program analyst for the FBI critical incident response group counter-IED section, shared what it’s like to work a crises in a joint environment.

When an incident happens, FBI phones ring off the hook from bomb technicians wondering what they are looking for, Pistorio said. By focusing on the components, tactics, techniques, and procedures the enemy is employing, the bureau is striking a really good balance of sharing needed information.

With government agencies, local bomb squads, and military personnel from multiple branches training and collaborating together, Raven’s Challenge X provides an avenue to increase the level of preparedness of all involved.

Sours: https://afreserve.com/st-blasts-through-world-s-largest-eod-exercise

Eod army units reserve

NY Army Guard explosive ordnance battalion Soldiers head to Middle East

GLENVILLE, N.Y. -- Twenty-three New York Army National Guard Soldiers assigned to the st Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), bid farewell to their families and headed off on the battalion’s third deployment on June 10, following a ceremony at the Armed Forces Reserve Center in Glenville, New York.

The battalion’s headquarters Soldiers are trained to oversee three to five explosive ordnance disposal companies and was converted from an infantry battalion headquarters in
The battalion deployed to Iraq in the fall of , serving there for nine months. In , 19 Soldiers from the battalion deployed to Afghanistan.
On this mission, the battalion will oversee explosive ordnance disposal missions throughout the Central Command area of responsibility as part of Task Force Spartan, the U.S. Army forces in the region.
Explosive ordnance disposal Soldiers support operations by detecting, locating, identifying, rendering safe, and disposing of all explosive ordnance, improvised explosive devices, and weapons of mass destruction.

“This is a well-established unit with professional training, professional leaders, noncommissioned officers, and Soldiers,” said Brig. Gen. Jack James the commander of the 53rd Troop Command.

“This is just the latest chapter in the long and illustrious history of this unit,” he added.

“For some of these Soldiers, this is their 2nd or 3rd deployment with this unit and the second time they’re deploying in the past two years,” said James.

The Soldiers first stop was Fort Indiantown Gap where they will complete two weeks of premobilization training. Their next stop will be Fort Bliss, Texas for 30 to 45 days of post-mobilization training.

Due to COVID restrictions, traditional pre-deployment training had to be modified to ensure the safety of the unit. This meant more training online and less in person, said Lt. Col. Douglas Baker, the battalion commander.

“All the obstacles that were thrown at us to train and prepare for this deployment, you guys excelled at,” Baker said.
“I was thoroughly impressed with the members of the unit on their ability to do a very good staff exercise using Microsoft Teams,“ he added.

During the pre-deployment training, even that conducted online, the experienced Soldiers shared tips with those deploying for the first time.

“For some of these Soldiers, this is their 2nd or 3rd deployment with this unit and the second time they’re deploying in the past two years,” said James.

Master Sgt. Eric Lautenschlager, an EOD technician who has been with the st since its inception, said he was excited to share his experience from his past three EOD deployments, and four total deployments, with the younger Soldiers.

“With me being one of the more experienced EOD technicians going,” said Lautenschlager. “I want to use this opportunity to help train up some of the soldiers and give tips for missions I’ve encountered.”

The New York Army National Guard is an extended family, Baker told the Soldiers and their families.

The battalion’s Family Readiness Group is there to help Soldiers families during the deployment, he said. It is often harder for the families than the Soldiers, Baker said, and we will be standing by you.

Several Soldiers on this deployment have many years of experience on their back, but some have just joined the unit and have less than 3 years of service in the National Guard.

Pfc. Olivia Chase, a year-old Army paralegal specialist who attended her first in-person drill in November after coming off of COVID orders, said she was enthusiastic about her first deployment.

She was one of the first considered after another Soldier could no longer go on the deployment.

Chase said she happily accepted the last-minute offer in hopes to further her military career.

“I’m definitely a little nervous just because I did just get back from training,” said Chase. “But I’m also very excited to network with other paralegals and develop a plan to eventually commission.”

The st Soldiers are expected to spend about ten months in Kuwait. They are expected to return home in May of

Date Taken:
Date Posted:
Story ID:
Location:GLENVILLE, NY, US 

Web Views:
Downloads:0

PUBLIC DOMAIN  

This work, NY Army Guard explosive ordnance battalion Soldiers head to Middle East, by SGT Jordan Sivayavirojna, identified by DVIDS, must comply with the restrictions shown on https://www.dvidshub.net/about/copyright.

Sours: https://www.dvidshub.net/news//ny-army-guard-explosive-ordnance-battalion-soldiers-head-middle-east
The bomb squad -🇺🇸 US Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal specialists who served in Kosovo

DESTROY DANGER.

ENLISTED

EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL (EOD)

3E8X1

Trained to detect, disarm and dispose of explosive threats in the most extreme environments, EOD technicians bravely serve as the Air Force’s bomb squad. Assigned to some of the most dangerous missions, they perform tactically harrowing and technically demanding tasks in diverse environments worldwide. Some of the best and bravest Airmen, they do what needs to be done to keep others safe and guarantee mission success, no matter the cost.

  • Handle explosives daily.
  • Detect, identify, recover, disarm and dispose of unsafe explosives and ordnance
  • Conduct nuclear weapon response Maintain equipment, technical data and vehicles
  • Analyze unknown munitions and explosives for intelligence agencies
  • Protect the president, vice president and other dignitaries.

Career tasks

/

QUALIFICATIONS SUMMARY

  • MINIMUM EDUCATION

    High school diploma, GED with 15 college credits, or GED

  • ASVAB REQUIREMENTS

  • QUALIFICATIONS

    • Height must be no less than 62 inches and no more than 80 inches.

    • Successful completion of the EOD Physical Ability and Stamina Test

    • Minimum score of 30 on EOD selection model

    • Normal depth perception

    • No record of claustrophobia

    • No record of emotional instability

    • Physical qualification and maintenance of personal physical standards

    • Completion of weeks of Basic Military Training (BMT)

    • Ability to receive and maintain a “Top Secret” security clearance

    • Must be between the ages of 17 and

BUILD NERVES OF STEEL

Swipe to see the training pipeline for EOD.

  • 01

    BASIC MILITARY TRAINING (BMT)

    Eight weeks | Lackland AFB, TX

    The first step to becoming an Airman happens in BMT, where trainees learn military structure, the core values of the U.S. Air Force and how to prepare both mentally and physically for life as an Airman.

    Learn More
  • 02

    EOD PRELIMINARY COURSE (EOD PRELIM)

    Six weeks/Sheppard AFB, TX

    To prove they have what it takes, Airmen must undergo intense strength and conditioning training. They’ll also receive instruction and assessment on their ability to operate under pressure while conducting explosive operations.

  • 03

    NAVAL SCHOOL, EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL (NAVSCOLEOD)

    Eight months/Eglin AFB, FL

    At this joint service schoolhouse, Airmen will train side by side with Army, Navy and Marine Corps candidates on subjects ranging from explosive tools and techniques to nuclear weapon response operations to build the skills needed to handle the most extreme situations.

DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES?

Swipe to see what is required to become an EOD technician so you can prepare before entering the pipeline.

Tools of the trade

EOD technicians rely on highly sophisticated tools to complete their inherently dangerous missions.
Sours: https://www.airforce.com/careers/detail/explosive-ordnance-disposal-eod

You will also like:

EOD Soldiers heading for Middle East

GLENVILLE-- Soldiers of the New York Army National Guard's th Ordnance Company (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) pose for a group portrait during their deployment ceremony conducted on February 13 at the Armed Forces Reserve Center in Glenville, New York. The Soldiers will be deploying to the Central Command area or responsibility after training at Fort Bliss, Texas.

Feb 16,

EOD Soldiers conduct annual trainig

DEVENS TRAINING AREA, Massachusetts-- New York Army National Guard Spc. Shawn Watts assigned to the th Explosive Ordinance Device Co. blows up C4 and flexible sheet explosives at Devens Training Area MA June 27 Watts was training how to set up and use the explosives part of his annual training.

Jul 09,

NY Guard EOD Soldiers head to Army-wide contest

MUSCATATUCK URBAN TRAINING AREA-- New York Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Evan Putman (left) and Spc. Michael Wing th Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Company 52nd Ordnance Group maneuver a Talon EOD robot through a lane during the 52nd Ordnance Group&#;s Best Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Team competition at Muscatatuck Urban Training Center Ind. Aug. 8 The Best EOD Team competition tested two Soldier teams on their basic EOD tasks as well as their warrior tasks and battle drills in a high stress and austere environment.

Sep 05,

EOD difuse situation at Fort Polk

FORT POLK-- New York Army National Guard Sgt. Jason Grossman an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) specialist assigned to the New Yorks th Ordnance Company (EOD) points to different parts of the EOD robot while they are strapped in place in the EOD Panther. New Yorks th Ordnance Disposal company joined more than New York Army National Guard Soldiers deployed for a three week exercise at the Armys Joint Readiness Training Center July

Aug 02,

Army Guard EOD meets Ravens Challenge

ORISKANY--New York Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Blake Alexander a member of the New York Army National Guards th Ordnance Company (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) and Trevor Butts of the Chautauqua County Sheriffs Office scope out a cabin in the woods where a possible bomb threat has been reported during training at the New York State Preparedness Training Center in Oriskany New York on May 18 . New York Army National Guardsmen trained for a week alongside domestic and international EOD military and law enforcement personnel during an exercise called Ravens Challenge May (U.S. Army National Guard Photo by Sgt. J.p. Lawrence released).

May 20,

EOD Soldiers Train local police

CAIRO--Staff Sgt. Adam Lendt a Soldier in the New York Army National Guards th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company explains the functions and capabilities of the TALON bomb disposal robot during a two-day joint training tactical operation with the Columbia-Greene County Shared Services Response Team at the Call Center in Cairo NY from February

Feb 16,

EOD Soldiers at Raven&#;s Challenge

ORISKANY--An officer of the Endicott N.Y. Police Department and a New York Army National Guard Soldier from the th Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Co. render safe a training IED during the Raven&#;s Challenge bomb disposal training exercise on June 24 at the New York State Preparedness Training Center in Oriskany NY.The Ravens Challenge in Oriskany brought together EOD units from the New York Army and Air National Guard U.S. Army police forces from across New York and military and police forces from Canada. Over the course of the week long challenge the forces shared their unique specialties and knowledge pooling resources to tackle multiple counter-IED exercises in a realistic training environment.

Jun 30,

EOD Soldier Honored for Afghan Heroism

GLENVILLE-- New York Army National Guard Sgt. Joshua Young, a member of the th Ordnance Company (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) receives the Bronze Star with V device for valor during a ceremony at the Scotia-Glenville Armed Forces Reserve Center here on Friday, July Brig. General Michael Swezey, the commander of the 53rd Troop Command presented Young with the medal. He was recognized for saving the life of a fellow Soldier while under continuous enemy fire on March 16, while he was serving in Afghanistan with an EOD battalion from Fort Drum, NY.

Jul 19,

EOD Soldiers Participate in Family Readiness Race

COLONIE-- New York Army National Guard Sgt. 1st Class Eric Lautenschlager, a member of the th Ordnance Company (Explosive Ordnance Disposal)crosses the finish line at the New York National Guard Family Readiness Council race at Crossings Park here on Sunday, Oct. 21 wearing a bomb suit, accompanied by th 1st Sgt. Kevin Conklin. A three-man team from the th participated in the fund-raising event by running the 60 pound suit for a mile each. Conklin was the first man in the relay. The race was won by Dave Thoman, an Albany resident. The top woman runner was Allison Bradley, also of Albany.

Oct 22,

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Soldiers Back Home

GLENVILLE--Sgt. 1st Class Michael Horner a member of the th Ordnance Company (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) is all smiles after greeting his family after returning from Operation New Dawn.Bases in Kuwait the th mobilized lastDedcember and supervised eight EOD Teams that were spread between three countries in the region.

Dec 05,

New York EOD Soldier On Duty in Kuwait

CAMP ARIFJAN, Kuwait -- New York Army National Guard Sgt. John Conley, a technician in the th Explosives Ordinance Disposal Team, walks out to a suspicious package in a bomb disposal suit to plant a disposal charge during a controlled detonation exercise here on April 5. The Pleasantville, NY resident was taking part in a demonstration for Brig Gen. Patrick Murphy, the Adjutant General of New York, during his trip to visit troops in Kuwait and Iraq. The Soldiers of the th are responsible for responding to unexploded ordnance and bomb threats in the Camp Arifjan area and also providing training to troops coming into the area of operations. The company, based in Scotia, was mobilized last year

Apr 27,

EOD Soldiers Meet With Guard Leader

GLENVILLE--Soldiers of the New York Army National Guard's th Ordnance Company (EOD)speak with Brig. Gen. Mochael Swezey, commander of the 53rd Troop Command, during their farewell ceremony Tuesday, Dec. 8 at the Glenville Armed Forces Reserve Center. The soldiers, who have been through a year of training in dealing with IEDs, mines, and unexploded ordnance, will go to Fort Lewis, Washington for post mobilization training and then deploy to Iraq for approximately 10 months in

Dec 09,

Sours: http://dmna.ny.gov/units/?unit=&page=featured


7018 7019 7020 7021 7022