Sony bravia tv

Sony bravia tv DEFAULT

PS5 just got an HDR upgrade — but only with these TVs

If you want the very best PS5 gaming experience you’ll need to have a Sony Bravia XR TV, all thanks to Sony’s new “Perfect for PlayStation 5” initiative. 

If you are lucky enough to have found a PS5 restock and have Sony’s stellar games console, as well as a Bravia XR TV, then you’ll be able to access ‘Auto HDR Tone Mapping’ and ‘Auto Genre Picture Mode.’

These two rather dully named features actually promise some visual upgrades to the PS5 gaming experience. Auto HDR Tone Mapping automatically selects the best HDR setting for the specific Bravia XR TV during the PS5’s initial setup. The idea here is it’ll help optimize colors and contrast to get the most out of a TV’s panel and ensure that a game’s details are picked out in full. 

Auto Genre Picture Mode detects whether a person is playing a game or watching a movie via the PS5’s Ultra HD Blu-ray player. In short, when the PS5 is switched on it'll automatically select a TV’s Game Mode when gaming to enable low-latency gaming, but when a movie is being watched, a TV’s Standard Mode is selected to ensure picture processing is given priority. 

Both modes could be a boon for PS5 owners who don’t want to fuss with switching over TV modes and carefully calibrating HDR settings. However, it’s worth noting that plenty of TVs can detect when a console is being used and switch to requisite game modes. And the auto HDR on offer from the PS5 isn’t the same as the Auto HDR function on the Xbox Series X; that’s a more powerful feature that applies HDR to games with no HDR modes or options. 

The current Perfect for PlayStation 5 Bravia XR TV models are:

Should you rush out and buy a Sony Bravia TV if you have just got a PS5? Perhaps not, as there are plenty of TVs like the LG CX OLED that have features and performance that work wonders for console gaming. Equally, if you’re due a TV upgrade, then perhaps a careful look at the Sony Bravia XR TVs on offer would be a shrewd move. 

But also check out our round up of the best gaming TVs, as you’re sure to find a set that'll enhance your gaming experience whether you have a PS5 or Xbox Series X. Heck, even the Nintendo Switch OLED looks great on a top-of-the-line television.

Roland Moore-Colyer is U.K. Editor at Tom’s Guide with a focus on news, features and opinion articles. He often writes about gaming, phones, laptops and other bits of hardware; he’s also got an interest in cars. When not at his desk Roland can be found wandering around London, often with a look of curiosity on his face. 

Sours: https://www.tomsguide.com/news/ps5-just-got-a-big-hdr-upgrade-but-only-with-these-sony-tvs

Sony's Bravia XR OLED Is the Best-Looking TV I've Ever Seen

Image for article titled Sony's Bravia XR OLED Is the Best-Looking TV I've Ever Seen

Sony has made a great deal of noise about their new 2021 Bravia XR OLEDs, which makes sense. The TVs are the first to feature Sony’s new Cognitive Processor XR, which sounds an awful lot like a proto-supervillain brain. The company says the processor will recreate how humans actually see things in real life.

After spending the last several weeks with the Sony Bravia XR A80J, I’m going to be very sad when I have to go back to my normal TV, because this Sony is the best-looking TV I’ve ever laid eyes on.

G/O Media may get a commission

Televisions

Sony Bravia XR A80J

What is it?

A very pretty OLED HDR 4K TV with a powerful brain

Like

Fantastic color, depth, and contrast, and still great in a bright room

Don't like

Sticky motion-smoothing settings that really want to be on, light on gaming features

A Sleek TV With Plenty of Ports

Setting the TV up is a challenge if you’re doing it on your own—the smallest of the three Bravia XR OLEDs is 55 inches, and at 42 pounds, it’s just unwieldy enough that you’ll ideally want help to attach the feet and stand it up. Speaking of the feet, they’re delightfully over-engineered, letting you choose a wide or narrow low-profile stance or a higher wide stance to accommodate, say, a soundbar. No screws are required, which is very nice—you just slide them into the bottom with a surprisingly satisfying clunk.

G/O Media may get a commission

The low profile options help with (my lack of) cable management, rendering wires all but invisible, and from the side, the panel nearly disappears, while the chunk containing the TV guts is a nice, flat slab. Cables connect from the bottom, in a cavity in the back, save for a set of ports on the side. Connecting things to those rear ports is as difficult as you’d imagine if you’re not actually looking at the back of the thing, but if you have it wall-mounted or you have space to turn it where it sits, the ports are clearly labeled.

The TV has three HDMI ports on the back and one on the side. The HDMI ports aren’t all created equal: two of them are HDMI 2.1, which means they can output 4K video at 120 Hz, one of those two is eARC/ARC, and the other two are regular HDMI 2.0, and can take a 4K signal at 60 Hz. On the back, you’ll also find ports for ethernet, optical audio, and USB, along with an RS-232C remote port. On the left side, in addition to HDMI, you’ll also find two more USB ports, a 1/8-inch headphone jack, and a mini jack for Video/Audio RCA signals, so you’ll need an adapter to hook up your Nintendo 64.

Life With Google TV

Turning the TV on, you’ll go through a series of privacy agreements and feature activation screens, and here you can either let the TV walk you through everything or go back and set things up piecemeal. The firmware seems to be a bit of a work in progress, however, and I experienced issues after setup related to my proclivity for running a TV with as few smarts as possible at the outset and activating features piecemeal later on. A couple of the bugs I encountered were smoothed over in the first firmware update the TV received, however, and I would expect others to be, also. In the end, none of them affected the movie-watching experience, so I figure no harm, no foul.

When you finish setup, there is a very cool, showy transition clip that signifies completion of setup, and you’re in the menu. If you choose not to set up Google TV, there is a clean, basic interface with four streaming apps automatically installed: Netflix, Prime Video, YouTube, and Disney+. You can also access USB media here, or watch live TV, among other features. Setting up Google TV is where you really get the most out of the TV’s interface. While I still prefer many elements of the Apple TV interface, Google’s OS has a great deal going for it. The system is swift and responsive, and Google does an excellent job surfacing content that I actually want to watch. That said, it’s not perfect, and lacks certain basic sorting features I’d rather see, particularly in the Library section, where browsing is limited by a side-scrolling-only layout, with no category breakdown or alternate viewing option.

In addition to all the normal streaming services, this TV also comes with Sony’s own streaming service, Bravia Core. Available only on their TVs, this is their way of ensuring they get to show off the best the TV can do, with a section of what they call “Pure Stream” movies: movies that you can stream at up to 80 Mbps, which begins nipping at the heels of the maximum bitrate of UHD Blu Ray. The TV comes with credits for five free movies on the service, and generally these use IMAX Enhanced with DTS rather than Dolby Vision/Atmos.

G/O Media may get a commission

Phenomenal Picture

OK, let’s get down to the most important feature: picture quality. The XR A80J has a plainly phenomenal picture. From one edge to the other, its 55-inch OLED panel provides an evenly-lit, crisp, clear picture with a slight, barely noticeable off-color tint when viewed at extreme angles (some color shifting is very normal for any OLED). I personally found that the IMAX Enhanced picture mode was almost indistinguishable from my post-calibration settings, and I preferred it to the slightly-too-dark cinema mode when watching non-Dolby Vision content. For some reason, I still have a large, frozen-in-time collection of DVDs and when I watched one, the TV did a very good job upscaling and smoothing out artifacts. With features like “Reality Creation” (who names this stuff?) turned on, if you tilt your head and squint, certain scenes almost look like real HD content.

Image for article titled Sony's Bravia XR OLED Is the Best-Looking TV I've Ever Seen

The panel shines most—quite literally—when watching recently-made, big ticket Dolby Vision-compatible movies. Any TV that can push that content is going to look good, but so broad was the dynamic range of the video output that when I watched the opening sequence of Thor: Ragnarok on my second night of having the A80J, I was startled by how bright the light from Thor’s hammer is relative to the darkness of Surtur’s cave. The effect is frankly dramatic and thrilling.

Color and contrast in every Dolby Vision movie I watched was superb. Color separation was great and and gradation was smooth, while light split from dark without haloing, and the only movie I tested where coloring lost any detail was the extremely high-saturation color version of Mad Max: Fury Road, and as far as I can tell, that’s just baked into the film anyhow (the Black and Chrome Edition looked fantastic, by the way). Throughout my time with the TV, I found myself noticing small visual details I’d missed on previous viewings of movies I’ve seen tens of times, and was delighted all over again by the look of movies like Atomic Blonde, which uses color sparingly, and to great affect. If I had to criticize anything about the picture, it’s that the movie transitions to black a bit too aggressively, obscuring details in the black that may have been intended to be seen by the creators. But that criticism, frankly, feels like trying to find ways Mr. Rogers could have been nicer.

Gaming was fine, not revelatory.

On the other hand, though I can only speak for the Nintendo Switch, gaming was fine, not revelatory. One can’t expect much from that system, granted, but I found the default calibration to be too muted, and I needed to tweak the highlights, overall brightness, and color settings to get the image to the right place. I didn’t notice any real input lag, which was good, but I don’t think this TV is made to excel in this arena. Only having two HDMI 2.1 ports and lacking variable refresh rate will turn off serious gamers, so if this is you, it’s probably best to look elsewhere.

Surprisingly Good Sound for a TV

If you’re spending $1,800 on a TV, it’s likely that you have a sound system you’d prefer to use, but for those who may not, don’t worry: This TV actually has surprisingly good sound all by itself. A few years ago, Sony did away with conventional down-firing speakers and started sticking the actuators behind the screen, essentially allowing the screen itself to become the speaker. The benefit of this, they say, is that it allows the TV to better simulate sound coming from particular points on the screen. In practice, I honestly can’t tell you whether this works or not, but I can tell you the sound is rich and balanced, and though you’ll definitely still want at least a decent soundbar, if you have to go without, the TV offers fine sound.

Nice Extras

Digging into the menu, you’ll find a somewhat intimidating array of features, but for the most part, the marketing terms applied to each option suffices to explain it. Much of the menu is comprised of sliders that adjust the intensity of video processing, and each setting is unique only to the video mode you’re currently in. Two motion-smoothing features that Sony calls Motionflow and Cinemotion seem to not just be toggled based on video mode, but also input, and I found that I kept having to readjust them until I’d gone through all the permutations of input/video mode. Of the two, I thought the Cinemotion option was more useful. That particular feature can be set to high or low, and primarily impacted judder, which is the tendency for 24 fps content to have jerky motion during panning sequences. I kept that feature on, but for Motionflow, I found that I wanted it off when watching movies, and it was maddening every time I started a movie and realized it looked like a soap opera.

Also noteworthy is the TV’s ambient optimization, which not only refers to ambient light, but also ambient sound. The TV uses its ambient light sensor to adjust not just brightness, but also the tone curve of the image, raising the brightness of darker parts of the screen where a bright room might otherwise make that difficult. Additionally, the ambient sound features of the TV use your remote to calibrate the audio relative to the acoustic environment of your room and your positioning while watching TV. The effect of this calibration is subtle, but effective.

The remote’s got all the buttons you need, but it’s very long.

The remote (for those who care) is long, and though I never use live TV anymore, it would still be nice if the numbered buttons were placed with a bit more ergonomic consideration. As it stands, you have to readjust how you hold the remote to reach them. More priority is given to the four buttons for YouTube, Netflix, Disney+, and Prime Video, which is great if you use them, but I wouldn’t mind the option to remap them to different services.

Worth Buying?

Overall, this is a fantastic TV for film enthusiasts. The picture preserves so much detail, gives such good contrast, and provides for so many different types of calibration/video format, that if you’re looking for something to be the centerpiece of your primary movie-viewing room, the Sony Bravia XR A80J would seem to be the conclusion, for now, of your search. If money is of little concern, of course, you could bump up to the higher-brightness A90J, but I don’t know that getting a touch more detail at higher brightness is really worth the extra $1,000. I will say, though, if you have $1,500 to blow on a TV, save just a little longer. It’s worth it.

G/O Media may get a commission

ReviewsTelevisions

Sours: https://gizmodo.com/sonys-bravia-xr-oled-is-the-best-looking-tv-ive-ever-se-1847380599
  1. Louis vuitton office supplies
  2. 1 25 scale garage
  3. Detroit 3rd precinct

Best Sony TVs 2021: budget, premium and smart

Best Sony TVs Buyer's Guide: Welcome to What Hi-Fi?'s round-up of the best Sony TVs you can buy in 2021.

Sony makes some of the best TVs around. While we would always advise brand agnosticism, it's natural to want to stick with what you know – so if you're happy with your current Sony TV, you came to the right place. We've rounded up the best Sony TVs available right now between 49- and 65-inches, drawing on our extensive library of reviews.

Sony has it all, including 4K models that use both LCD and more modern OLED panel technology. The Japanese giant even offers 8K sets, if you're ready to make the leap. All of the below TVs also offer HDR support. HDR stands for High Dynamic Range, and is a way of showing the differences between light and dark parts of the picture, meaning a more detailed image. Sony's sets support various HDR formats, including HLG, HDR10 and Dolby Vision, but not HDR10+.

Sony TVs tend to use Google's Android TV operating system, which supports all the major streaming apps including Netflix, Prime Video, Disney+, Apple TV+ and Google Play Movies & TV. There's also voice controls, so you should be able to say, "Ok Google, find action movies" to search across your favourite apps.

Without further ado, let's see the best Sony's TVs the market has to offer. 

1. Sony XR-55A80J

The best pound-for-pound Sony TV you can buy right now.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in, 77in)

Type: OLED

Backlight: not applicable

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system: Google TV

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Reasons to buy

+Super-sharp and detailed+Punchy and vibrant but natural+Superb motion handling

Reasons to avoid

-Incomplete HDMI 2.1 feature set-Missing UK catch-up apps

The A80J what we'd called a 'step-down flagship'. It's is less immediately striking than the A90J below, but it's a lot more affordable. Indeed, it recently picked up 'Best 55-58in TV' at the What Hi-Fi Awards 2021. 

In many ways it's almost as good as the awesome A90J. For general sharpness and detail, the A80J more or less matches the flagship A90J, and that puts it head and shoulders above most rivals in those regards. Every shot is magnificently crisp.

Sony’s OLEDs use Acoustic Surface Audio for sound, which involves tech that vibrate the whole screen rather than traditional speaker drivers. The A80J’s system has half as much power (a total of 30W rather than 60W) as the A90J.

Netflix content is, of course, available through the A80J, and is presented – along with Amazon Prime Video and Apple TV – in 4K, Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos, where the content allows. 

The A80J might not be quite as punchy as its flagship sibling but, in many other ways, it’s just as capable. A seriously smart – and now Award-winning – buy.

Read our full Sony XR-55A80J review

2. Sony XR-55A90J

A fantastic Sony flagship packed with technology.

Specifications

Screen size: 55in (also available in 65in, 83in)

Type: OLED

Backlight: not applicable

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system: Google TV

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 71 x 122 x 4.1cm

Reasons to buy

+Outstanding picture quality+Superb motion handling+Impressive sound

Reasons to avoid

-No VRR (yet), buggy [email protected] UK catch-up apps-Expensive

While Sony’s OLEDs are highly regarded, it’s typically hard to justify buying one over cheaper offerings from LG. But what if Sony could produce a TV with most of those previously missing features, a more satisfying user experience, and a unique high-quality movie streaming app, all while raising the picture and sound quality to even greater heights? That's exactly what the company's done with the A90J.

In performance terms, the Sony A90J is an absolute stunner. It takes OLED picture performance to new, thrilling levels while maintaining the authenticity for which Sony is justifiably renowned. 

The new Google TV operating system means the user experience is better than that of any pre-2021 Sony TV, gaming features are top-notch and the exclusive Bravia Core streaming service is a genuine value-added feature.

All in all, the X90J is simply one of the very best TVs you can buy right now. If you happen to be in the market for a Sony TV, so much the better.

Read the full Sony XR-55A90J review

Read the full Sony XR-65A90J review

3. Sony XR-65X90J

The best, big, mid-range Sony TV you can currently buy.

Specifications

Screen size: 65in (also available in 50in, 55in, 75in)

Type: LCD

Backlight: Direct LED

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system: Google TV

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 33 x 57 x 2.8 inch

Reasons to buy

+Lovely, authentic colour balance+Superb motion handling+Solid feature set

Reasons to avoid

-Limited blacks and viewing angles-Fairly rough standard-def-Missing UK catch-up apps

If you’re looking to add some serious cinematic scale to your living room without breaking the bank, the Sony XR-65X90J (or near-identical XR-65X94J) could be just what you’re looking for thanks to its heady mix of advanced features, excellent picture performance and agreeable price tag.

Features include two HDMI 2.1 sockets that support [email protected] (but not yet VRR) and the new Google TV operating system. The picture is superbly natural, authentic and balanced, and while the sound is clear and direct.

You could buy a 55-inch OLED for around £1500 / $1500 / AU$2000, but the X90J gives you the option to go for a TV that’s a little less premium but a full 10 inches bigger. If that’s the choice you make, the X90J (or X94J) absolutely demands your attention.

If you want a bigger or smaller TV, the X90J is also available in 50-inch, 55-inch and 75-inch sizes. We've not yet reviewed those versions but below you'll find the latest, lowest prices at the bottom of this page.

Read the full Sony XR-65X90J review

4. Sony KD-48A9

Sony’s first 48-inch OLED TV is extraordinarily good.

Specifications

Screen size: 48in

Type: OLED

Backlight: not applicable

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system: Android TV 9

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 62 x 107 x 5.8cm

Reasons to buy

+Striking picture+Bold sound+Solid app selection

Reasons to avoid

-Expensive-Lacks next-gen HDMI features

It's official: 48 is the new 55. Time was that you couldn't get an OLED TV under 55in, but then LG launched the world's first commercially available 48in OLED set. Others including Panasonic, Philips and Sony quickly followed.

This petite 2020 TV boasts tiny bezels and a low profile pedestal stand. It does have a rather large enclosure bolted onto the back (to house the speakers, processing hardware and connections), but you'll only notice if you look at the set side-on.

Sony's X1 Ultimate processor makes images suitably stunning; there's plenty of dark detail on show, and it serves up pretty much every streaming app you could hope for. Motion control is still industry-leading, and in terms of sharpness and detail, there's never been a better TV at this size. 

The only slight disappointment is the lack of some next-gen HDMI features such as [email protected] (HFR), VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) and Auto Low Latency Mode. That's bad news for gamers looking to hook up a PS5 or Xbox Series X, but it shouldn't a dealbreaker. Pound for pound, this is one the best Sony TV you can buy.

Read the full Sony KD-48A9 review

5. Sony KD-65XH9005

One of the best performance-per-pound Sony TVs you can buy in 2021.

Specifications

Screen size: 65in

Type: LCD

Backlight: Full array

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system: Android TV 9

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83.3 x 145 x 7cm

Reasons to buy

+Superb HDR+Colours pop+Excellent motion processing

Reasons to avoid

-Lightweight sound-Could be more PS5-ready

The 65XH9005 is one of the TVs that Sony is selling as "ready for PS5". That means it offers [email protected] (often referred to as HFR), VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) and ALLM (Auto Low Latency Mode). Put simply, it's a great TV for those who want to max out their PS5 gaming experience.

But whether you make use of the gaming features or not, this is an awesome TV. There are plenty of connections for hooking up partner kit, and you won't be wanting for onboard tech: this is a full-array LED-backlit TV with local dimming, and supports the HDR10, HLG and Dolby Vision HDR standards, and Dolby Atmos for sound. It’s also Netflix Calibrated and IMAX Enhanced.

And the picture quality? Excellent. Sony’s X-Motion Clarity motion processing technology is reliably superb, making fast-moving pictures like games, sports and action films as smooth as butter. There are plenty of options to fiddle with, but just leave it on auto and you'll still be treated to a great experience visually. It's got good sound, too. A little lightweight compared to some, but it's clear, precise and well projected. An ideal option for both gamers and non-gamers alike.

Read the full Sony KD-65XH9005 review

6. Sony KD-49XH9505

A brilliant Sony TV that sets the benchmark for all 49in sets.

Specifications

Screen type: LCD with direct LED backlight

Resolution: 4K

Operating system: Google Android TV 9

HDR support: HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG

HDMI inputs: 4

USB inputs: 3

Optical output: 1

Dimensions (HWD, with stand): 109.3 x 69.9 x 26.1cm

Reasons to buy

+Punchy, rich picture performance+Vastly improved sound+Snappy user experience

Reasons to avoid

-Same design as last year-Some backlight bloom

Successor to the 49XG9005 below, Sony's KD-49XH9505 manages to squeeze in a heck of a lot of TV tech for a TV of this size. It's an attractive set from the front, with a slim brushed-metal bezel although make sure its wide feet can be accommodated on your TV stand. It gets the same remote as Sony's more premium sets, which works particularly well, thanks to the fact it works over Bluetooth. The Android TV interface is quick to respond while Sony's made its on-screen menus cleaner and simpler to use. 

Inside, you get one of Sony's best picture processing chip, the X1 Ultimate, which promises better definition and an enhanced version of Object Based HDR Remaster, which promises better contrast. And it all adds up to an extremely punchy and vibrant picture, with loads of detail and excellent motion handling, which is a traditional Sony strength. Sound quality is also impressive by flatscreen standards. The set uses its own room calibration to help present you with a weighty and dynamic sound.

What we have here is a brilliant Sony all-rounder, capable of giving more expensive rivals a real run for their money. Definitely one for your list.

Read the full review: Sony KD-49XH9505

7. Sony KD-75ZH8

Sony’s most affordable 8K TV yet delivers bags of detail and great sound.

Specifications

Screen type: LCD w/ direct LED backlight

Resolution: 8K

Operating system: Android TV 9.0

HDR support: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

HDMI inputs: 4

USB inputs: 3

Optical output: 1

Dimensions (HWD, with stand): 122.6x191.3x43.2cm

Reasons to buy

+Bright and punchy picture+Superb colours and motion+Impressive sound

Reasons to avoid

-Blooming around bright highlights-Plays even less 8K than rivals-Missing some HDMI features

You'll need deep pockets and a spacious abode to accommodate Sony's new 75-inch 8K TV, but once installed, the ZH8 doesn't disappoint. This set does a lot of things seriously well, and delivers a supremely authentic picture performance. Sound is exceptional, too (you can even use the ZH8 as the centre speaker of a surround sound package).

As you'd expect for the best part of £5000, the ZH8 boasts one of Sony’s most powerful processors, plus high-end image-enhancing technology such as Object Based Super Resolution. The result is that 8K content is so crisp, dynamic and lifelike that you feel you could step right into each scene.

Problem is, there's almost no 8K content available at the moment. And while this forward-thinking Sony set does a decent job of upscaling 4K content, the likes of the Samsung QE75Q950TS do it better. 

Still, if you want the best Sony TV that delivers a stunningly-natural 4K picture and has the ability to display 8K resolution, the cutting-edge ZH8 is a superb buy at this price.

Read the full review: Sony KD-75ZH8

8. Sony KD-75ZF9

A massive 4K Sony TV with suitably top-of-the-range performance.

Specifications

Screen type: LCD with direct LED backlight

Resolution: 4K

Operating system: Google Android TV

HDR support: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

HDMI inputs: 4

USB inputs: 3

Optical output: 1

Dimensions (HWD, with stand): 103.9x167.6x39.9cm

Reasons to buy

+Natural, realistic images+Good upscaling+Excellent selection of apps

Reasons to avoid

-Lacks brightness and black depth-Uneven backlighting

Sony's 2018 Master Series TV is designed to produce a picture closer to the director’s intention than any commercially available television has done before. This is Sony's LCD entrant to the range, though it has direct LED backlighting onboard to help deliver deeper blacks. It's a stunning TV, though 4K picture quality is a little softer than the very best. If you're upscaling from HD to HDR, you're in for a treat, thanks to the impressively sharp and detailed picture. Throw in ultra-realistic colours and Sony's excellent motion processing, and you've got quite a TV on your hands. 

Sony's 2021 A90J and Z9J Master Series models offer better technology, but you can still this model up online, and at a big discount. Worth considering given the price drop.

Read the full review: Sony KD-75ZF9

9. Sony KD-65AG9

A talented Sony TV, especially where sound quality is concerned.

Specifications

Screen type: OLED

Resolution: 4K

Operating system: Google Android TV

HDR support: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

HDMI inputs: 4

USB inputs: 3

Optical output: 1

Dimensions (HWD, with stand): 71.4x122.6x25.5cm

Reasons to buy

+Detailed, natural image+Impressive SDR performance+Excellent sound

Reasons to avoid

-HDR lacks sparkle-Tricky to tweak-Processing too prominent

Another set from Sony's high-end Master Series, the 65in AG9 is a gorgeous OLED TV, perched on a pedestal stand with thin black bezels making the chassis melt away in darkened rooms. It's blessed with the usual smattering of HDMI (4) and USB (3) inputs and, like the vast majority of Sony sets, it runs on Google's Android TV platform. All your key smart services are catered for, including Netflix and Amazon Video with HDR10, HLG and Dolby Vision HDR all supported.

It takes a bit of time getting the Sony to look its best, but once settled, you're treated to a balanced picture, full of detail and crisp three-dimensionality. Motion processing is arguably best-in-class too. Some rival sets boast a brighter and punchier image, though, and the Sony isn't the last word in detail.

On the plus side, this model (and the 55in version) sounds brilliant for a flatscreen TV, with a wide soundstage and a sense of focus and precision that you don't normally get from such slender sets. There's impressive weight but also enough space for dialogue to breathe.

Read the full review: Sony KD-65AG9

Read the full review: Sony KD-55AG9

MORE:

Our pick of the best TV deals 2021

Save money with this week's best OLED TV deals

Round up of today's best deals

Sours: https://www.whathifi.com/us/best-buys/tvs/best-sony-tvs

Bravia (brand)

Brand of Sony Visual Products Inc.

Sony Bravia logo.svg
OwnerSony Corporation
Typemainly LCD, LED & OLEDHDTV
Retail availability2005–present
Menu interface
PredecessorSony WEGA
Related articlesHDTV
Sony
ProductionTokyo, Japan
London, UK
Mexico City, Mexico
Sydney, Australia
New York City, USA
Shanghai, China
Hong Kong, China
Singapore
Istanbul, Turkey

Bravia (stylized as BRAVIA) is a brand of Sony Visual Products Inc.,[1] a wholly owned subsidiary of Sony Corporation, and used for its television products. Its backronym is "Best Resolution Audio Visual Integrated Architecture". All Sony high-definition flat-panel LCD televisions in North America have carried the logo for BRAVIA since 2005. BRAVIA replaces the "LCD WEGA" which Sony used for their LCD TVs until Summer 2005[2][3] (early promotional photos exist of the first BRAVIA TVs still bearing the WEGA moniker).[citation needed]

Bravia televisions and their components are manufactured in Sony's plants in Mexico, Japan, and Slovakia for their respective regions and are also assembled from imported parts in Brazil, Spain, China, Malaysia and Ecuador. Principal design work for BRAVIA products is performed at Sony's research facilities in Japan, at the research and development department at the Sony de Mexico facility in Baja California, Mexico and at the Sony Europe facility in Nitra, Slovakia.

The brand is also used on mobile phones in North American, Japanese and European markets.[4]

In 2014, in part of Sony President & CEO Kasuo Hirai's plans to turn Sony around, BRAVIA was made into an subsidiary rather than just a brand of products.

In May 2015, Sony launched their first lineup of Androidtelevision Bravia models, which allows users to easily access content from services like YouTube, Netflix and Hulu as well as install apps and games from the Google Play Store. Noteworthy for being the first Android TV available,[5][6] Sony's Android TVs are now integrated with the Google Assistant for controlling home automation and voice commands.[7]

In September 2016, Sony announced that TVs older than 2012 will lose access to YouTube.[8]

Sony introduced their first OLED Android TV under the BRAVIA brand, named as the A1E in January 2017[9] with an X1 Extreme processor.[10] The A8F was the next OLED TV introduced by Sony at CES 2018.[11][12][13] At IFA 2018, the A9F with an X1 Ultimate processor was unveiled.[14][15][16] In 2019, Sony introduced newer version 4K OLED models, A8G and the Master Series A9G, followed by the A8H in 2020. For 2021 Sony offered the world's first cognitive intelligence TVs with its latest XR A.I. Cognitive Processor in the new A80J and Master Series A90J.[17]

Bravia's Flagship X series in October 2008. From left to right: XBR8, XBR7 and XBR6 (North American model type)

Product range[edit]

Main article: List of Sony BRAVIA televisions

Sony's BRAVIA series HDTV

Accessories[edit]

In April 2007, Sony launched the BRAVIA TDM-IP1,[18] a docking cradle to permit playback of audio and video hosted on an AppleiPod on a BRAVIA model television.

Current accessories available include a Skype camera (CMUBR100) and Wi-Fi adapter (UWABR100).[19]

Sony Bravia Internet TV and Video[edit]

Sony Bravia Internet Video first became available in late 2009 on Internet enabled Bravia TV's, later becoming available on Sony Blu-ray and home theatre systems. The original Bravia Internet Video was built around Sony's XMB interface and had several streaming media partners including: Amazon Video On Demand, YouTube, Yahoo!, Netflix and Sony Video (Qriocity).[20] 2011 saw a revamp of Bravia Internet Video, with a rework of the interface and an added Skype capability.[citation needed]

Sony Bravia Internet TV is the first TV to incorporate Google TV, currently only available in the US. It plans to revolutionize IPTV.[21]

XBR8 is a series of Sony BRAVIA LCD High Definition Televisions. They were released into the US marketplace starting in September 2008.

The 46- and 55-inch models of the XBR8 series features an RGB LED backlight system which Sony calls Triluminos. The new backlight system is claimed to provide a truer and higher color spectrum and allows this series of televisions to rival plasma displays in terms of dark blacks. This model also marked the debut of Sony's new video processor, the BRAVIA Engine 2 Pro. The display panel uses ten-bit processing and offers the 120 Hz MotionFlow technology.

The XBR8 line offers two screen sizes; the 46" (KDL-46XBR8)[22] was released on September 29, 2008. The second model, the 55" (KDL-55XBR8)[23] became available for order in October 2008.[needs update]

In the United Kingdom, recent Bravia Televisions also include YouView built in, which gives users access to an interactive EPG in addition to on-demand services from the BBC and ITV incorporated into a single search menu.[24]

Green TV[edit]

For sale in Japan on July 30, 2008, Sony's green product, a new flat-panel 32-inch TV for ¥150,000 (US$1,400; €900) BRAVIA KDL-32JE1 offers ecological consumers the advantage of 70% less energy consumption than regular models with same image quality. For consumers who rely on electricity generated from carbon dioxide emitting sources, it reduces carbon dioxide emissions totaling 79 kilograms (174 pounds) a year.[25][26]

Mobile phones[edit]

BRAVIA-branded Sony Ericssonsmartphone for the Japanese market (DocomoFOMA SO906i, released 2008)

Sony uses a BRAVIA image processing engine in high-end mobile devices produced by its Sony Mobile Communications, starting with the Xperia arc model in 2011. Subsequent flagship models of Sony's smartphone range such as the Xperia S, and Xperia Z use enhanced versions of the BRAVIA engine.

In addition, BRAVIA brand phones have been produced by Sony/Sony Ericsson. BRAVIA brand phones are able to watch 1seg terrestrial television.

A picture of a Sony logo during turning On with the Sony BRAVIA.
The Sony logo, as it appears on startup on a BRAVIA TV.
FOMA SO903iTV (Released in June 2007)
FOMA SO906i (Released in June 2008)
FOMA SO-01C (Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc) (Released in March 2011)
U1 (Released in December 2009)
S004 (Released in May 2010)
S005 (Released in November 2010, successor of S004)

Internals[edit]

The LCD panels within BRAVIA TVs are manufactured by Sony Corporation with a special architecture. Since 2010, the high end Bravia LX, HX and selected NX series use a 10th gen Sony Bravia ASV panel.[citation needed] The 8th gen SPVA panel from Sony LCD continue to serve other midrange and budget Bravia models.[citation needed]

Many Sony televisions with USB connectivity run Linux.[27]

Upgrading and maintenance[edit]

The software can be upgraded via a USB type A interface labeled "DMEx / service only" and via the Internet for later models.

2006–2007 models may be updated using a memory stick or USB. Depending upon the country and TV standard the tuner may need a service device to update it.

It appears that units manufactured through November 2005 for sale in Asia and North America contained a software bug that prevented the device from powering up/down after 1200 hours.[28] A free upgrade is available.[29]

Uses and features[edit]

  • Can be used to watch live TV
  • Can stream original contents from streaming apps
  • It is supported by Dolby audio

References[edit]

  1. ^ソニービジュアルプロダクツ株式会社 発足のお知らせ Sony 2014-06-37
  2. ^Verena Ottmann (2005-10-13). "Sony: Bravia statt Wega" (in German). PC-WELT. Retrieved 2021-09-05.
  3. ^"Sony TV-Serie: Aus "WEGA" wird "BRAVIA"" (in German). areadvd.de. 2005-10-13. Retrieved 2021-09-05.
  4. ^"FOMA Spring 2007 Gallery: SO903iTV". NTT DoCoMo. Archived from the original on 2009-09-01. Retrieved 2007-08-09.
  5. ^"Sony Electronics Offers Extensive 4K Ultra HD Home Entertainment Solutions with New 2015 TV Lineup".
  6. ^"Sony's Android-powered 4K TVs and new soundbars are coming in May".
  7. ^"Smart Home Features: Smart TV Apps, Internet, Streaming & More". Retrieved 2018-10-26.
  8. ^Sony removes Youtube app from 50 BRAVIA smart TV models - Myce.com
  9. ^"Sony Unveils its Latest Products at CES 2017". Sony Global - Sony Global Headquarters. Retrieved 2018-10-26.
  10. ^"Sony starts rolling out its XBR-A1E OLED TVs sooner than expected - and cheaper too | OLED-Info". www.oled-info.com. Retrieved 2018-10-26.
  11. ^Sony (2018-01-08), Sony's Press Conference at CES 2018, retrieved 2018-10-26
  12. ^Preston, Dominic. "Sony at CES 2018: what was announced". Tech Advisor. Retrieved 2018-10-26.
  13. ^"Sony Announces New OLED and LCD 4K HDR TV Series with Refined Picture Quality and Enhanced User Experience". Mynewsdesk. Retrieved 2018-10-26.
  14. ^"Sony A9F | MASTER Series | OLED | 4K Ultra HD | High Dynamic Range (HDR) | Smart TV (Android TV)". Sony. Retrieved 2018-10-26.
  15. ^Sony Europe (2018-08-30), IFA 2018 – Sony press conference, retrieved 2018-10-26
  16. ^"Sony IFA 2018 News and Live Stream Product Announcements | Sony US". www.sony.com. Retrieved 2018-10-26.
  17. ^"BRAVIA XR–World's first TV with cognitive intelligence". Sony. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  18. ^"Sony introduces BRAVIA TDM-IP1 iPod dock". Engadget. Archived from the original on 2007-05-22. Retrieved 2007-04-15.
  19. ^Sony Accessories – Official Site.
  20. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-04-06. Retrieved 2011-11-13.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  21. ^Sony Google TV, hands onArchived October 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine – CNET.
  22. ^http://www.hitechreports.com/cheap-flat-screen-tv/
  23. ^http://www.hitechreports.com/small-lcd-tv/
  24. ^"YouView: Overview, Setup and User Guide | Sony UK". www.sony.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-05-19.
  25. ^www.iht.com, Sony develops green flat-panel TV to woo ecological consumers
  26. ^gmanews.tv/story, Sony woos ecological consumers with new flat-panel TVArchived January 6, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  27. ^"GPL and LGPL notices for several Sony TV models". Archived from the original on 2011-12-02. Retrieved 2012-01-02.
  28. ^Brandon Hill. "Over 400,000 Sony BRAVIA TVs Found To Be Defective". Daily Tech. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2007-04-15.
  29. ^"Update My TV". Sony. Archived from the original on 2007-04-27. Retrieved 2007-04-15.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bravia_(brand)

Bravia tv sony

Almost every night, when he sees something, he sees more than just a dream. A living dream. With a suite of all visual and tactile sensations.

Peluncuran Sony BRAVIA XR TV

The girl slightly strained her stomach, and nervously moved her beautiful legs. Having inserted a tip from a heating pad into her ass, I started up the water: - Breathe deeply with your tummy, bunny: through your mouth, open your mouth: I stroked. My daughter on her stomach. -: like this.

You will also like:

I get carried away by the kiss, and you suddenly cut it off abruptly and start moving your tongue along my neck, it tickles and feels good. At the same time. As if accidentally touching my fly. The member is already standing. You remember how huge, hot, sweet he is.



5066 5067 5068 5069 5070