Minecraft command block

Minecraft command block DEFAULT

Getting Started with Command Blocks

  • 6 minutes to read

Command blocks are a specialized type of block within a Minecraft: Bedrock Edition world that allows the use of console commands in-game. The same commands that players can type from chat can be run automatically by command blocks using redstone power.

In this tutorial, you will learn the following;

  • What are command blocks and how to access them in-game.
  • How commands can be used via command blocks.
  • How command block chains work by stringing together multiple command blocks.
  • Create a gameplay loop to reward a player after performing an action.

In this guide, we will set up a command block chain to look for a certain type of block in a set location, and then reward the player for placing a block in the correct place.

Requirements

  • A Minecraft world with cheats enabled.

Setting the map up

While command blocks can be used in any Minecraft world, we will be using a flat world for a simple and clean environment.

  1. Launch Minecraft: Bedrock Edition.
  2. Select Play, select Create New, then select Create New World.
  3. In the world settings, set the world type to Flat.
  4. In the world settings, enable Show Coordinates.
  5. In the world settings, enable Activate Cheats.
  6. Select Create.

How to get Command Blocks

Command blocks can only be obtained by running a command.

  1. Open up chat.
  2. Type the following command: .

You will see a single command block that been added to your inventory.

How to use Command Blocks

First, place the command block on the ground like any other block. Look at the command block from the side, and you may notice an arrow.

Image showcasing CommandBlock Arrows pointing to the right of the image

These arrows will always point towards the player when placing down. The arrows show the flow of execution. As shown in the image, the block on the left will execute first, followed by the middle command block, and finally the last block on the right will execute.

Click the Use button (right-click on PC) to open up the command block user interface.

Command Block User Interface

Overview of the command block graphical user interface

  • Block Type defines what type of command block this is. There are 3 options:
    • Impulse command blocks are activated when they receive a redstone signal.
    • Chain command blocks are activated when a command block pointing into it is activated.
    • Repeat command blocks are activated once every in-game tick, as long as they have a redstone signal. Minecraft has 20 ticks per second.
  • Condition defines when a command block will execute its action. There are 2 options:
    • Conditional will only execute if the previous block in a chain was successful.
    • Unconditional will execute regardless if the previous block was successful or not.
  • Redstone defines whether or not a command block requires redstone to activate. There are 2 options:
    • Needs Redstone will set the command block to only activate when it has redstone power.
    • Always Active will set the command block to always activate with or without redstone. For impulse command blocks, this causes them to only run once, so it isn't very useful. For chain command blocks, this is enabled by default.
  • Execute on First Tick is only usable for repeating command blocks with a delay. If enabled, the command will execute as soon as the block is powered, and then will wait for the delay before running again. If disabled, the command will not run the first time until the delay has finished.
  • Delay in Ticks is a value that defines how long a command block waits to execute after the command block receives redstone power.

Designing a Gameplay Loop

A use case of command blocks is allowing creators to create gameplay loops within Minecraft. A simple gameplay loop would be rewarding a player for completing an action. If the gameplay loop was to give a player an emerald for placing a diamond block in a certain location, you can break down each step needed:

  1. Check to see if a diamond block exists at a set location.
  2. If it does, check to see if the player has already received the reward.
  3. If the player hasn't received the reward, give the player an emerald.
  4. After giving the player an emerald, mark that they have received the reward.

Setting up the first Command Block

Now that we have looked at the settings of a command block, let’s set up the first block to detect a certain type of block in a location.

  1. Place a command block on the ground in a location near your player character.
  2. Open up the command block interface.
  3. Set the Block Type to Repeat.
  4. Set the Redstone to Always Active.

The Command

The command looks for a specific block at a specified point in the world.

  • position is the coordinates in the world where the command will look for the specific block. Example: .
  • tileName is the type of block you are looking for. Example: .
  • dataValue is an optional argument used to handle variations of the same block. For this tutorial, we won't be needing to use this.

If you are following this tutorial, you will be in a flat world. As you walk around, you can see your player's position in the top-left of the screen. Let's check for a block near the origin.

  1. In the Command Input section, input the following: .
  2. Close the interface.

Command Block Chains

For the next step, we need to place a chain command block. As mentioned above, chain command blocks execute when a block pointing into them is activated. Make sure you place the block like the image showing the arrows.

Setting up the Command Block

  1. Place another command block next to the existing block. Make sure that the new block is placed in front of the direction that the arrow is pointing.
  2. Open the command block interface.
  3. Set the Block Type to Chain.
  4. Set the Condition to Conditional.
  5. Set the Redstone to Always Active.
  6. Set the Command Input to

Since the second block is set to Conditional, this new block will only execute if the first command block succeeds, meaning the diamond block was present. This command checks to see if the player hasn't already received the reward.

Setting up the Reward Command Block

Let’s add a third block to set a command to reward the player for placing a block in the right spot.

  1. Place another command block next to the existing block. Make sure that the new block is placed in front of the direction that the arrow is pointing.
  2. Open the command block interface.
  3. Set the Block Type to Chain.
  4. Set the Condition to Conditional.
  5. Set the Redstone to Always Active.
  6. Set the Command Input to .

Once again, this command will only activate if the previous command succeeded, meaning both the diamond block was present and the player hasn't received the reward yet.

Closing the loop

If we stop now, placing the diamond block at will give the player 20 emeralds per second! That's because we need to do one last step, marking the player as having received the reward.

  1. Place another command block next to the existing block. Make sure that the new block is placed in front of the direction that the arrow is pointing.
  2. Open the command block interface.
  3. Set the Block Type to Chain.
  4. Set the Condition to Conditional.
  5. Set the Redstone to Always Active.
  6. Set the Command Input to

Testing the loop

If everything has been set up correctly, you can now place a diamond block on location and you will receive a single emerald in your player inventory.

Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/minecraft/creator/documents/commandblocks

Minecraft is one of the best ways to introduce young and new people to coding. Command blocks are easy to learn and use, and Java programming is right around the corner with Minecraft mods and Bukkit plugins. It’s also just a very fun place for experienced coders to tinker in.

What are Command Blocks and Why Should I Use Them?

Command blocks are a redstone component that execute console commands when powered. Console commands can be ran from the chat window by proceeding them with a forward slash, ‘ / ‘. Commands are used to modify the game world in ways that aren’t possible by hand, and, when used correctly in command blocks, give Minecraft it’s own sort of psuedo-programming language. Code consists of two things: logic and execution, and most programming languages require both to be written in text. Minecraft coding takes a different route; the logic and structure of the program is determined by where the blocks are placed and how they are wired up, meaning that you can fly over your world and see the different parts of your program laid out block-by-block.

Ok, so How Do I Start?

This guide makes use of the new command blocks in version 1.9. It will work in 1.8, but may require a bit more expertise.

Open up a new Minecraft world (Superflat works best), make sure you’re in Creative mode, and press the “/” button. This is the command window, which is the same thing as the chat window, except it starts you off with a ‘ / ‘, and anything starting with the forward slash is a command.  The first command you can run is

/give @p minecraft:command_block

Let’s break this down. The command “/give” puts items into a players inventory and has two arguments: the player and the item to give. The “@p” is a target selector. The selector “@p” selects the nearest player. Alternatively, you could also use your Minecraft username, but if you run a command from the console you will always be the nearest player. The other target selectors are “@a” for all players, “@r” for a random player, and “@e” will target all entities. Entities include everything that isn’t a block, like monsters, snowballs, animals, and arrows.

The command should execute successfully and give you a new block. Place it anywhere on the ground to get started.

You can see that the command block points in the direction you place it, a lot like hoppers or furnaces. This will be important later.

Right click the block (or use whatever key you use to access crafting tables and furnaces) and you will be greeted with the command block GUI.

It seems a little scary at first, but don’t worry, all of those buttons do something. The button that says “Impulse” changes the type of command block. There are three different types of command blocks:

  • Impulse, which run commands on the rising edge of redstone current. This means that when they are powered, they will run their command once and stop, even if they continue to be powered. This is the default setting and is the only one available in 1.8
  • Repeat, which run commands every tick they are powered. A tick is like a frame, and multiple commands can be run in a single tick, up to 20 times a second.
  • Chain, which only run if the command block that is pointing into it has executed its command. These will run in order, one after the other, in a single tick, hence the name ‘Chain’.

The button that says “Unconditional” stops the command block from checking if the previous block in the chain has executed successfully. The other option, “Conditional”, only runs if the previous block threw no errors.

The button that says “Needs Redstone” only runs the command if the command block is powered. The other option, “Always Active” stops the command block from checking if it is powered and just assumes it is. This option should not be used with Impulse command blocks as it makes them useless.

Let’s make a chain, our first ‘script’. Place down an chain command block or two facing into the first impulse command block, like this:

Make sure to set the chain blocks to “Always Active”. Otherwise we would need to place down redstone blocks or current, which takes up unnecessary space. Place a button on the impulse command block at the start of the chain, and press it.

Nothing will happen. This is because we haven’t filled them with commands yet! Right click the impulse block to edit it, and put in a basic command

say start

Notice how we don’t need a forward slash in command blocks. You can use one if you want, but it’s unnecessary. The “/say” command takes one argument, text, and says it from the point of view of whoever executes it. If you run it, it will display as “<username> message” just like regular chat. If it’s ran from a command block, it will be “[@] message”. Alternatively, there is “/tell”, which takes a player argument, and “/tellraw” which is like “/tell” except it takes raw JSON instead of text.

You can fill the chain command blocks to write more things to chat. They will be executed in order, without delay, in the same tick. If you want to run them with a delay, you will need to set up them up with redstone repeaters. Along with “/say”, there are other basic commands that do more things, like “/give”, which gives items, “/effect”, which applies potion effects, “/setblock” and “/fill” which modify your world, and many others. A large database of commands can be found on the Minecraft Wiki, along with other helpful content.

Target Selectors

The “@p” target selectors are actually much more powerful than they seem at first glance. For example, if we wanted to target all entities, we would use “@e”, but if we wanted to target only Zombies, we would use

@e[type=Zombie]

Notice the brackets after “@e”. Inside those brackets are target selector arguments, a full list of which can be found on the Minecraft Wiki. The “type” argument only selects entities of a certain type, this one being “Zombie”. If we wanted to target all  Zombies within 10 blocks of the command block, we would use

@e[type=Zombie,r=10]

With the “r” being a radius argument. You can also target by location, name, team, and score, among others.

Chaining Commands

Let’s introduce another command that isn’t like the others. The command is “/execute”. This command takes another command as input and executes it from the point of view of another entity. The structure of “/execute” is

/execute @target X Y Z /command

X, Y, and Z are coordinates to run the command from. This doesn’t matter with most commands, but matters a lot if you use relative positioning. A relative position starts with “~” and is followed by a positive or negative number indicating how many blocks from the origin, which is denoted by “~ ~ ~”. So, for example, if we wanted to run “/say” as if a Villager was talking, we can set up the command like this:

/execute @e[type=Villager] ~ ~ ~ /say Hey

This command will cause a message to go out to everyone, from every villager. This isn’t optimal if we have more than one person or more than one villager, so let’s reformat that command:

/execute @a ~ ~ ~ /execute @e[type=Villager,c=1] ~ ~ ~ /tell @p Hey

This is much more complex than the first, and involves chaining two “/execute” commands together. The first “/execute” of the command runs on every player, then the second checks for exactly one Villager nearby, and then has that Villager tell the closest player “Hey”. This makes sure that only one Villager talks per person.

Learning the Syntax

There are certainly a lot of commands in Minecraft that each have their own syntax. The help menus for each command will usually tell you quickly what arguments the command needs, and the Minecraft Wiki has a detailed list of what each own does. It’s not so much about knowing exactly what every command does, but knowing how to use them together. Minecraft is a game, after all, so playing around with the commands is part of the learning process.

Sours: https://www.howtogeek.com/226078/the-beginners-guide-to-command-blocks-in-minecraft/
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A command block is a block that can execute commands. Because it cannot be obtained or edited in Survival mode without cheats, it is primarily used on multiplayer servers, in Creative worlds, and custom maps.

Obtaining[]

Command blocks are not available in the Creative inventory. It can either be obtained by using the pick blockcontrol, or by using various commands, such as , or .

In Java Edition, just like other blocks that can store NBT data, using pick block + copies the command and options inside the command block. This allows it to be placed elsewhere without having to re-enter the data inside.

Command blocks also cannot be broken in Survival or Creative mode without operator permissions, are not flammable, and have the same blast resistance as bedrock. Command blocks, structure blocks, and jigsaw blocks cannot be mined in Survival.

Usage[]

See also: Commands and Tutorials/Command blocks and functions

A command block can execute commands when activated by redstone power. It always has permissions of 2 level‌[Java Edition only]/1 level‌[Bedrock Edition only], so it can be used to allow a specific use of a command by players who can't use that command in general (for example, allowing anyone to obtain a specific item with without allowing everyone to /give themselves whatever they want).

A command block has an orientation that determines the chain command block to activate, and the blocks to be checked to see if a command block in "Conditional" mode executes.

To execute the command, in Java Edition in multiplayer in the server.properties file must be set to (default is ); in Bedrock Edition "Command Blocks Enabled" in options must be enabled.

Modification[]

To enter command or modify the command block, use the Use Itemcontrol on the command block to open the command block GUI (graphical user interface). The GUI opens only if the player is in Creative mode, and has the proper permissions. That means, in singleplayer, "Allow Cheats"‌[JE only] or "Activate Cheats"‌[BE only] in options must be enabled. In multiplayer, Gui can be opened only by operators in Creative mode, and in Java Edition in the server.properties file must be set to or above (default is 4).

In Java Edition to enter command or modify the command block, in the server.properties file must be set to (default is ).

In Java Edition, opening the GUI in singleplayer pauses the game.

Console Command‌[JE only]/Command Input‌[BE only]
Commands can be entered in the top text pane. The text limit for commands in a command block is 32,500 characters, but the text pane can show only a small portion of this amount at a time.
Commands in a command block do not need to be prefixed with the forward-slash () as they do in the chat window, but doing so still works.
Press to complete words or cycle through options.
In Bedrock Edition, below the console command text pane are some reminder tips about how to use target selectors.
Previous Output
The bottom text pane displays the output message (success or failure) of the last executed command (it is blank‌[JE only] or ""‌[BE only] initially). Its text is not editable.
A button to the right of the Previous Output text pane‌[JE only] or the left of the "Previous Output"‌[BE only] specifies whether the last output should be stored and displayed. It is ‌[JE only]/enabled‌[BE only] when the output text should be stored and ‌[JE only]/disabled‌[BE only] when the output text should not be stored. For worlds with many command blocks, especially command blocks running on fast clocks, not storing the output text can reduce memory and storage requirements.
If gamerule is true (the default), default to ‌[JE only]/enabled‌[BE only]. Otherwise defaults to ‌[JE only]/disabled‌[BE only].
Block Type
Click the "Impulse/Chain/Repeat"‌[JE only]/"Block Type"‌[BE only] button to change the command block's type. The default state is "Impulse", but non-default command blocks can be obtained and placed. The command block also changes color when changing its command block type:
  • "Impulse" command blocks are orange. These execute once every time they are activated.
  • "Chain" command blocks are green. These execute once every time they are triggered if they have been activated.
  • "Repeat" command blocks are purple. These execute their commands once every one game tick (or more‌[BE only]) as long as they are activated.
Condition
Click the "Conditional/Unconditional"‌[JE only]/"Condition"‌[BE only] button to change the command block's conditional behavior:
  • "Conditional": A command block in conditional mode executes its command only when the command block behind it has executed successfully ("Success count" is greater than 0).
  • "Unconditional" (default): A command block in unconditional mode executes its command even if there's a command block behind it that didn't execute its command successfully.
"Behind it" in the sense of opposite to the direction the command block is facing, regardless of chain direction or even if chaining is occurring.
Redstone
Click the "Always Active/Needs Redstone"‌[JE only]/"Redstone"‌[BE only] button to change the command block's activation requirements:
  • "Needs Redstone" (the default for impulse and repeat command blocks): A command block in the "Needs Redstone" setting can be activated only with redstone.
  • "Always Active" (the default for chain command blocks): The command block is activated when set to "Always Active". Then it is always active even without redstone activation.
Execute on First Tick‌[BE only]
Specifies whether a repeat command block executes its command as soon as it is activated. If it's disabled, executes the first time after the delay from the time when it is activated.
Delay in Ticks‌[BE only]
For impulse or chain command block, specifies how many game ticks it delays before executing a command after it is activated or triggered.
For repeat command block, specifies how many game ticks it delays to execute again.
Note that for impulse or repeat command block, 0 and 1 work the same; the game takes 0 as 1. However, For chain command block, 0 and 1 are different.
Hover Note‌[BE only]
Specifies the name of the command block, which can be seen when you point to the block. It is also used for message commands. If the command block had been named in an anvil before placement, that name is used as well. If it is empty, defaults to .
Done
In Java Edition, click the "Done" button or to save the command and leave the command block GUI.
In Bedrock Edition, close the GUI to save the command and changes.
Cancel
Click the "Cancel" button or ‌[JE only]to leave the command block GUI without saving any changes.

Activation[]

Command blocks are redstone mechanisms and can be activated by:

A command block can also be activated by setting it to "Always Active" mode.

When activated, a command block executes its command, depending on the command block's type:

  • An impulse command block executes its command once.
  • A chain command block does not execute its command until it is triggered.
  • A repeat command block executes its command once every one game tick (or more‌[BE only]) until no longer activated.

Execution[]

An impulse command block, when it is activated, checks whether the command block behind it has executed successfully (if in conditional mode). After the delay of 1 game tick (or more‌[BE only]), if the condition is met before the delay (if in "Conditional" mode), it executes its command once and triggers the chain command block it is pointing to.

A repeat command block, when it is activated, after 1 game tick (always 1 no matter how many "Delay in Ticks" is), checks whether the command block behind it has executed successfully (if in conditional mode). If the condition is met, and if "Execute on First Tick‌" is enabled in Bedrock Edition, it executes its command once and triggers the chain command block it is pointing to. If it is still activated, it then checks, executes, and triggers the chain command block again after 1 game tick (or more‌[BE only]).

When executing a command, it also updates its success count: If in "Conditional" mode, if the command block behind it didn't execute successfully, it sets its success to count to 0. Otherwise, it sets it to the success count of the command.

Also:

  • When an impulse or repeat command block in "Needs Redstone" mode with a command is placed or is cloned by a command to a powered location, the new command block executes its command only if it hasn't been activated with redstone. In Java Edition, it also needs a block update to execute its command.
  • When an impulse or repeat command block in "Always Active" mode with a command is placed or is cloned by a command to a powered location, the new command block executes its command only if it hasn't been activated with redstone.
  • When an impulse or chain command block is set to "Repeat", if it has been activated, checks whether the command block behind it has executed successfully (if in conditional mode). After 1 game tick (always 1 no matter how many "Delay in Ticks" is), if the condition is met, it executes its command once and triggers the chain command block it is pointing to. Then it checks, executes, and triggers the chain command block again after 1 game tick (or more‌[BE only]).

Trigger and chaining[]

If any command block having executed its command (whether successfully or unsuccessfully) faces a chain command block, it triggers the chain command block to also attempt execution.

When a chain command block is triggered,

  • If it has been activated,
    • It checks whether it is in "Conditional" mode and the command block behind it hasn't executed successfully (Behind in the sense of the direction it is facing, not in the sense of which command block chained to it),
      • If true, it triggers another chain command block it is facing, without executing the command.
      • If false, it checks whether it has been already executed in this game tick. If false, it executes the command and triggers another chain command block it is facing. If true, it does nothing. That means that chained execution cannot be passed to a command block that has already executed in that game tick (loops execute only once).
  • If it has not been activated, it triggers the chain command block it is facing to attempt execution.

Chained command blocks execute simultaneously in the same game tick in the order they are chained.

In Bedrock Edition, it can also delay before executing commands if "Delay in Ticks" is not 0:

When it is triggered,
  • If it has been activated, the chain command block checks whether the command block behind it has executed successfully (if in conditional mode), then it delays.
    • After a delay, if the condition is met before the delay (if in "Conditional" mode), it executes its command once and triggers the chain command block it is pointing to no matter whether the condition met.
  • If it has not been activated, it triggers (without delay) the chain command block it is facing to attempt execution.

In Java Edition, it can execute multiple times in the same game tick if "UpdateLastExecution" is set to false. In this case, it does not check whether it has already executed in this game tick.

If the chain command block has been activated when triggered, it also updates its success count: If in "Conditional" mode, if the command block behind it didn't execute successfully, it sets its success count to 0. Otherwise, it sets it to the success count of the command.

Output[]

When activated, a command block can produce multiple types of output:

Success count[]

A command block can power a redstone comparator facing away from it (possibly separated by a block) with signal strength specific to the success count. Success count is an integer between 0 to 2,147,483,647 (inclusive).
The signal strength always reflects the last command executed, even after the command block is deactivated.
In Java Edition, success count is usually 0 or 1, except for and .
In Bedrock Edition, success count is an integer related to command (e.g., the number of players affected by the command, the number of blocks that were altered, the value returned by the command, etc.)
In Java Edition, leaving the command block GUI with clicking the "Done" button or resets the success count to 0, no matter whether making changes in the GUI. In Bedrock Edition, leaving the GUI with changes resets the success count to 0.

Message[]

The output message describes the success or failure of the executed command, and may be written to multiple destinations:
Previous Output: The output message is always written to the "Previous Output" text pane of the command block GUI.
Chat: The output message is written to the chat text in singleplayer mode, or broadcast to all other ops in multiplayer mode, unless it has been suppressed with . Some commands may write additional text to the chat as their normal function, which won't be suppressed (for example, the command writes a message to the chat of all players), separate from the output message. Chat messages that would usually be prefaced by a player's name (such as from the , and commands) use ‌[Java Edition only] / ‌[Bedrock Edition only] as the player name. If the command block had been named in an anvil before placement, that name is used instead. In Bedrock Edition, it can also modified in the GUI.
Logs: The output message is written to multiplayer server logs unless it has been suppressed with .

Notes[]

Command blocks execute commands with OP level 2. The following commands cannot be used in a command block: , , , , , ‌[JE only], , , , , ‌[BE only], , , , , and (i.e., , , and all of the multiplayer-only commands except ).

Easter eggs[]

Main article: Easter eggs § Command blocks

Running "Searge" (case insensitive) as the command in the command block without a preceding "" will set the previous output to "#itzlipofutzli". Its success count is 1.

Piston interactivity[]

Command blocks cannot be pushed by pistons. They also cannot be pushed or pulled by sticky pistons.

Sounds[]

Java Edition:

Bedrock Edition: [needs in-game testing]

SoundSourceDescriptionResource locationVolumePitch
??Once the block has broken?1.2
??Falling on the block with fall damage??
??While the block is in the process of being broken?0.75
??Jumping from the block??
??Falling on the block without fall damage??
??Walking on the block??
??When the block is placed?1.2

Data values[]

ID[]

Java Edition:

NameResource locationBlock tags (JE)FormTranslation key
Command Block
Block & Item
Chain Command Block
Block & Item
Repeating Command Block
Block & Item

Bedrock Edition:

NameResource locationNumeric ID FormTranslation key
Command BlockBlock & Item
Chain Command BlockBlock & Item
Repeating Command BlockBlock & Item
NameSavegame ID
Block entity

Metadata[]

See also: Data values

In Bedrock Edition, a command block's block data specifies its orientation and condition mode.

BitsValues
0x1
0x2
0x4

A 3-bit field storing the command block's facing:

  • 0: facing down
  • 1: facing up
  • 2: facing north
  • 3: facing south
  • 4: facing west
  • 5: facing east

6 and 7 are unused but produce command blocks facing down and up respectively.

0x8 Whether the block is in conditional mode.

Block states[]

See also: Block states

Java Edition:

NameDefault valueAllowed valuesDescription
conditional
True if the command block is in conditional mode.
facing




The direction the command block is pointing.

Bedrock Edition:

NameDefault valueAllowed valuesDescription
conditional_bit
True if the command block is in conditional mode.
facing_direction




The direction the command block is pointing.

Block data[]

A command block has a block entity associated with it that holds additional data about the block.

Java Edition:

See also: Block entity format

  • Block entity data
    •  auto: 1 or 0 (true/false) - Allows to activate the command without the requirement of a redstone signal.
    •  Command: The command to issue to the server.
    •  conditionMet: 1 or 0 (true/false) - Indicates whether a conditional command block had its condition met when last activated. True if not a conditional command block.
    •  CustomName: Optional. The name JSON text component of this command block, replacing the usual '@' when using commands such as and .
    •  LastExecution: stores the tick a chain command block was last executed in.
    •  LastOutput: The last line of output generated by the command block. Still stored even if the gamerule commandBlockOutput is false. Appears in the GUI of the block when right-clicked, and includes a timestamp of when the output was produced.
    •  powered: 1 or 0 (true/false) - States whether or not the command block is powered by redstone or not.
    •  SuccessCount: Represents the strength of the analog signal output by redstone comparators attached to this command block.
    •  TrackOutput: 1 or 0 (true/false) - Determines whether the LastOutput is stored. Can be toggled in the GUI by clicking a button near the "Previous Output" textbox. Caption on the button indicates current state: "O" if true, "X" if false.
    •  UpdateLastExecution: 1 or 0 (true/false) - Defaults to true. If set to false, loops can be created where the same command block can run multiple times in one tick.

Bedrock Edition:

See Bedrock Edition level format/Block entity format.

History[]

See also: Commands § History

Java Edition
July 27, 2012Jeb began tweeting of a new block he had created to start expanding Adventure mode. He began posting pictures, ideas and hints of what the block can do.
July 31, 2012During Notch's AMA on Reddit, he hinted the block may be in Java Edition 1.4.
1.4.212w32aImpulse Command Block JE1.png Added command blocks.
1.513w03aCommand block success can now power a redstone comparator.
13w04aCommand blocks renamed with an anvil now use their name instead of @ in the chat.
13w10aPressing in a command block will exit its GUI.
1.6.113w19aCommand blocks are no longer mineable in Survival.
Command blocks are no longer damaged by explosions, except by blue wither skulls.
1.7.213w37aA bar that shows the previous output of command blocks has been added.
The character limit when inserting a command in a command block has been increased from 256 to 16,369. Using a third-party editor allows the player to reach 32,767 characters.
1.814w07aDispensers now place command blocks, instead of shooting them out.
14w20aThe in-game character limit of 16,369 has been removed, allowing access to the full 32,767 characters.
14w27aAdded CommandStats NBT tag to command blocks.
1.8.6Dispensers no longer place command blocks.[1]
1.915w33aThe character limit for command blocks is now 32,500 instead of 32,767.
15w34aChain Command Block JE1.pngRepeating Command Block JE1.png Added the chain command block and the repeating command block.
Added block facing for command blocks.
Impulse Command Block JE2.png The texture of command blocks has been changed.
15w34bAdded Conditional mode within command blocks.
Added tab completion support within command blocks.
15w35aImpulse Command Block JE3 BE1.pngChain Command Block JE2 BE1.pngRepeating Command Block JE2 BE1.png The textures of all three command blocks have been changed.
Conditional Impulse Command Block JE1 BE1.pngConditional Chain Command Block JE1 BE1.pngConditional Repeating Command Block JE1 BE1.png When command blocks are set to conditional, the back of the arrow texture is now curved.
Added Always active and needs redstone options for command blocks.
Added NBT tag to control redstone options within command blocks.
15w36aPlayers are now unable to use commands, such as , within command blocks.
Players, who are unable to use commands, can no longer place command blocks.
15w36dEach command block type now appears with different colors on maps.
16w02aRunning in a command block now randomly uses one of various different humorous phrases as the previous output.
16w04aRunning "Searge" as the command in the command block without a preceding "" now sets the previous output to "#itzlipofutzli".
1.1116w32aThe blockentity ID has been changed from to .
1.1217w16aChains of command blocks no longer schedule their commands to be run in the nexttick. Instead, they now execute all in the same tick they are read. This allows later blocks in a chain to be modified via earlier blocks, allowing techniques like branching and looping, all in the same tick.
Added game rule to control the max length of such a chain.
17w17aAdded and NBT tags, which control the tracking of which tick a chain command block was last executed in.
pre6Tab-completing command names in command blocks no longer add a prefix.
1.1317w47aPrior to The Flattening, the numeral IDs for the command block, repeating command block, and chain command block were 137, 210, and 211, respectively.
pre1The player can now tab-complete in command blocks again.
1.1418w43aImpulse Command Block JE4.pngChain Command Block JE3 BE2.pngRepeating Command Block JE3.png The textures of command blocks have been changed.
18w47bImpulse Command Block JE5 BE2.pngRepeating Command Block JE4 BE2.png The textures of impulse and repeating command blocks have been changed.
Upcoming Java Edition
1.1821w37aCommand blocks don't display their command input, even when the player types in a command.[2]
21w40aCommand blocks now display their command input when the player types in a command.
Pocket Edition
1.0.5alpha 1.0.5.0Impulse Command Block JE3 BE1.pngChain Command Block JE2 BE1.pngRepeating Command Block JE2 BE1.png Added all types of command blocks.
Bedrock Edition
1.8.0beta 1.8.0.8Command blocks now have a default name of instead of .
1.10.0beta 1.10.0.3Impulse Command Block JE5 BE2.pngChain Command Block JE3 BE2.pngRepeating Command Block JE4 BE2.png The textures of command blocks have been changed.
1.12.0beta 1.12.0.2Tab-complete has been added to command blocks.
Added a delay option to command blocks, which allows a delay to be added to a redstonetick delay field.
Legacy Console Edition
TU19CU7 1.12 Patch 1Impulse Command Block JE1.png Added command blocks.
Command blocks do not have any functionality and can be obtained only with mods.

Gallery[]

Sours: https://minecraft.fandom.com/wiki/Command_Block

Command Blocks are special blocks in Minecraftthat you can use to execute commands. These can be customized to do a variety of things to automate things on your Minecraftserver.

Players can do fairly complex things with Command Blocks, and they can be placed in a connecting chain to activate a series of commands to automate processes.

How to get a Command Block

Note that only server admins can make Command Blocks.

For Minecraft Bedrock Edition, you’ll need to do the following:

  1. Enable cheats in your world or Realm settings.
  2. Turn on Creative Mode in your world or Realm settings.
  3. Open the chat box and enter “/give [your username] command_block”
  4. Place the block where you want it.

You can turn off cheats and Creative Mode after you’re doing placing the blocks in your desired location.

For Minecraft Java Edition, you’ll need to do the following:

  1. Go to the “server.properties” file in your server’s config files.
  2. Change the line that says “enable-command-block=false” to “enable-command-block=true”
  3. Give yourself a Command Block by opening the chat box and entering “/give [your username] minecraft:command_block”
  4. Turn on Creative Mode by typing “/gamemode c” in your chat box.
  5. Place the Command Block where you want it.

You can turn the game back to Survival Mode by typing “/gamemode s” in the chat box after you place the block.

How to set up a Command Block

Once your Command Block is placed, there’s a couple settings you’ll see when you interact with it.

Image: Mojang/Microsoft via Polygon

Choosing between “Impulse”, “Current” or “Repeat”, and “Chain” will decide when your Command Block activates.

Impulse will make the command run once and stop.

Current or Repeat (depending on your version) will make the command repeat consistently while powered.

Chain will make it so the block will only run after the connecting Command Block runs, allowing players to set up more complex systems.

A Command Block set at “Unconditional” will run no matter if the previous Command Block ran successfully. “Conditional” makes it so it’ll only run if the previous Command Block ran.

You can also set your Command Block up to be powered by Redstone. Selecting “Needs Redstone” will make it only activate if the block has Redstone. Selecting “Always Active” makes the command run regardless.

Whatever command you want set up goes into the “Command Input” section. You can use it to kill enemies if you don’t like a particular one or other things. Minecraft commands can be a little complicated at times, especially when using it in Command Blocks, but you can check out a list of commonly used commands here so you don’t have to do the heavy lifting yourself.

Sours: https://www.polygon.com/2020/9/11/21375364/how-to-make-use-command-blocks

Block minecraft command

As they say, I have experience and practice. -What's the matter with you. - Everything is with me. Although doctors, too, shrug their shoulders looking at my complaints.

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Although very tempting. The fact is that Allochka is an elegant blonde, and his secretary is a burning brunette, not plump, but so plump, seemingly elastic and appetizing. It is tempting, tempting: During the next break, a friend called me aside: So how, Yegorych. Are we changing. Ritka baba wow.

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