Twra elk cam

Twra elk cam DEFAULT

Elk in Tennessee

Cervus canadensis

Identification

Height 4-5 ft. (122-152 cm). Wt.: males, 700-1000 lbs. (315-450 kgs); females, 500-600 lbs. (225-270 kgs). Beam length of antlers to 64 3/8 in. (164 cm); record spread 75 in. (188 cm). A large deer with pale yellowish rump patch, small white tail, general reddish-brown body (chestnut-brown neck with a mane in males), and huge spreading antlers on males in late summer and autumn.  Skull (Plate 32) has 34 teeth.  There are 4 mammae.

Similar species

Moose has a large overhanging snout and brown rump.
Mule Deer is smaller and has black on the tail.
Whitetail Deer is smaller; no rump patch.
Woodland Caribou has whitish neck.Habitat
Semi open forest, mt. meadows (in summer), foothills, pains, and valleys.

Habits

Most active mornings and evenings.  Usually seen in groups of 25 or more; both sexes together in winter, old bulls in separate groups during summer.  Feeds on grasses, herbs, twigs, bark.  Migrates up mountains in spring, down in fall; males shed antlers Feb.– March; velvet shed in Aug.  Attains adult dentition at 2 1/2-3 years.  Calf has high-pitched squeal when in danger; cow has similar squeal, also sharp bark when traveling with herd; males have high-pitched bugling call that starts with a low note and ends with a few low-toned grunts, heard during rutting season, especially at night.  Lives 14 years (25 in captivity).  Females breed at 2 1/2 years.  Rut starts in Sept.; old males round up harems.

Young

Born May-June; normally 1, rarely 2; gestation period about 8 1/2 months.  Spotted.  Able to walk a few minutes after birth.

Economic status

Can do considerable damage to vegetables, pastures, grainfields, and haystacks; a prize game mammal for meat and trophies; formerly ranged over much of continent, now restricted.  There have been numerous attempts to reestablish them, some successful, others not.  May be seen commonly in following national parks: Grand Teton, Yellowstone, Olympic, Glacier, Rocky Mt., Banff, and Jasper; also other places where they have been introduced.  Apparently established on Afognak I., Alaska (not on map).  

Source: Peterson’s Field Guide, Third Edition. 1976.

Sours: https://www.tn.gov/twra/wildlife/mammals/large/elk.html

Elk cam in Tennessee is a huge hit with wildlife enthusiasts

An image from the elk cam located at the North Cumberland Wildlife Management Area.

The closest elk to Nashville in Tennessee are located about 200 miles away, but now you can see the state's largest animal live without leaving your home.

Thanks to the new elk cam, posted online by state wildlife officials, the majestic animals can be watched throughout the day.

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Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency officials found the spot the elk most like to hang out — Hatfield Knob in the North Cumberland Wildlife Management Area — and placed a solar-powered field camera there.

The camera is at https://www.tn.gov/twra/wildlife/mammals/large/elk.html and nearly 40,000 people clicked on it the first two days it went online in March.

The camera has gotten about 5,000 views per day since then.

An image from the elk cam located at the North Cumberland Wildlife Management Area.

"People like watching them because they're big, beautiful animals and this is an unobtrusive way of seeing them," said TWRA information manager Doug Markham. "I think folks just like learning habits by watching wildlife. You can watch them rest and feed in this large, grassy area on the plateau."

Elk are located almost exclusively in the North Cumberland Wildlife Management Area near Knoxville. That's where about 50 of the animals were imported from Canada and released in 2000 when the Tennessee elk restoration program was launched.

The species was wiped out in Tennessee in the mid-1800s by over-hunting. However, the population has since grown to about 400.

Up to 75 elk have been seen at one time on the camera. At other times, however, there are no elk in the field.

"They come and go," Markham said. "There are some days they don't show up at all, and there are some days they'll stay almost all day."

There also is a viewing tower at Hatfield Knob, which attracts up to 20,000 visitors each year.

"We like that the tower is very popular and gets so many visitors, but we hope this cam is seen by hundreds of thousands and eventually over millions of folks over time," Markham said.

Something to look forward to in the fall, Markham said, is the bugling male elk do in the rutting period.

"The males bugle for mates and it's a really cool sound and we're going to work toward getting the audio right and make that happen," he said.

Reach Mike Organ at 615-259-8021 and on Twitter @MikeOrganWriter.  

Sours: https://www.tennessean.com/story/sports/2018/04/18/elk-cam-tennessee-huge-hit-wildlife-enthusiasts/528491002/
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WATCH: TWRA introduces live elk camera

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is making it easy for everyone to get a glimpse of dozens of elk who make their home in East Tennessee.

The elk camera is located at the Hatfield Knob Viewing Area on North Cumberland Wildlife Management Area, in Campbell County. You can watch it here.

The camera is operated by solar power, and is live during daylight hours.

TWRA officials say as many as 75 animals have been viewed at a single time on the cam. Viewers are encouraged to visit the site often as the elk move around and are not in viewing range all the time.

"We know not everyone can drive to Hatfield Knob to see elk, but this elk cam lets you see them up close without any disturbance to the animals," said Doug Markham, the agency's communications manager. "Of course if you want to travel to the tower, and many people do, it is a great place to visit."

But the elk aren't always there.

"They don't always cooperate," said Matthew Cameron, TWRA's information and education coordinator. "They come and go and there's no real apparent reason or time frame that they're here."

So if the drive is too long to risk not seeing any elk, that's where the elk cam fills the void.

Cameron said the live feed is already a hit, crashing early on from too many viewers in its first few days.

The elk cam could be the first of many animal cams popping up across Tennessee.

"A lot of our folks across the state thought it was really cool and thought, hey, we need a bat cam or a trout cam for fish, so we do have other ideas," Cameron said.

But for now, the elk are the stars, captured by the $20,000 system.

"We felt pretty confident it'd be money well spent to set it up here and that it would pay off," Cameron said. "So far we're seeing really good results."

The elk viewing area tower was constructed in 2005 and has been visited by thousands of wildlife watchers since then. Here's how to get there.

Elk were reintroduced to the North Cumberland WMA in 2000.

Sours: https://www.wbir.com/article/news/local/watch-twra-introduces-live-elk-camera/51-536013447

TWRA launches New Elk Cam from Hatfield Knob Viewing Area

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency - TWRANashville, TN – The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s has launched a new elk cam located at the Hatfield Knob Viewing Area on North Cumberland Wildlife Management Area.

The new cam has undergone testing and is now active for public viewing. A link to the elk cam is located on the TWRA website. It can be viewed on a cell phone, personal or desktop computer. The elk cam, which is operated by solar power, will be live during daylight hours.

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s Elk Cam Wide Shot. (TWRA)

As many as 75 animals have been viewed at a single time on the cam. The area is off limits to any type of hunting.

Viewers are encouraged to visit the site often as the elk move around and are not in viewing range all the time.

“We know not everyone can drive to Hatfield Knob to see elk, but this elk cam lets you see them up close without any disturbance to the animals,” said Doug Markham, the agency’s communications manager. “Of course if you want to travel to the tower, and many people do, it is a great place to visit.”

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s Elk Cam close up shot. (TWRA)

The elk viewing area tower was constructed in 2005. Thousands of wildlife watchers have made their way to the tower located north of Lafollette in Campbell County. Elk were reintroduced to the North Cumberland WMA in 2000.

“The elk cam is a work in progress,” Markham said. We realize we might sometimes lose power or streaming service. However, we will do whatever we can to make improvements and keep the elk cam live.”

Sours: https://www.clarksvilleonline.com/2018/04/08/twra-launches-new-elk-cam-from-hatfield-knob-viewing-area/

Cam twra elk

Live Tennessee Elk Cam! 

In Partnership with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency • Powered by HDOnTap

 

The live elk camera is located in Hatfield Knob, Tennessee. Enjoy watching the elk and other wildlife you may see on the live cam!

 

The elk (Cervus canadensis) is one of the largest species within the deer family, Cervidae, in the world, and one of the largest terrestrial mammals in North America and Northeast Asia. 

 

Habbits: Most active mornings and evenings.  Usually seen in groups of 25 or more; both sexes together in winter, old bulls in separate groups during summer.  Feeds on grasses, herbs, twigs, bark.  Migrates up mountains in spring, down in fall; males shed antlers Feb.– March; velvet shed in Aug.  Attains adult dentition at 2 1/2-3 years.  Calf has high-pitched squeal when in danger; cow has similar squeal, also sharp bark when traveling with herd; males have high-pitched bugling call that starts with a low note and ends with a few low-toned grunts, heard during rutting season, especially at night.  Lives 14 years (25 in captivity).  Females breed at 2 1/2 years.  Rut starts in Sept.; old males round up harems.

 

Young: Born May-June; normally 1, rarely 2; gestation period about 8 1/2 months.  Spotted.  Able to walk a few minutes after birth.

 

Economic Status: Can do considerable damage to vegetables, pastures, grainfields, and haystacks; a prize game mammal for meat and trophies; formerly ranged over much of continent, now restricted.  There have been numerous attempts to reestablish them, some successful, others not.  May be seen commonly in following national parks: Grand Teton, Yellowstone, Olympic, Glacier, Rocky Mt., Banff, and Jasper; also other places where they have been introduced.  

 

For more information about Tennessee's elk visit the TWRA website. 

Sours: https://hdontap.com/index.php/video/stream/tennessee-elk-live-cam
2017 - PA Game Elk Cam Highlights

It has been about 150 years since elk wandered throughout Tennessee. Early records indicated that elk were abundant in the state prior to being settled by European explores and colonists. Their numbers proved a plentiful resource that explorers, trappers, and settlers depended on for survival. But left unmanaged, unregulated hunting and loss of habitat eventually became too great, and elk herds east of the Mississippi disappeared by the late 1800s. Since then, efforts by hunter-conservationists and state wildlife agencies have helped restore elk populations across the nation.

TWRA decided to reintroduce elk to the state in the late 1990’s. Part of the agency’s mission is to restore extirpated wildlife when and where it is biologically and sociologically feasible. Beginning in December 2000, the agency began conducting small releases of elk from Elk Island National Park (AL, Canada) into the North Cumberland Wildlife Management Area. There were 201 elk in total that were released over a period of eight years.

Visit the Hatfield Knob Elk Viewing Tower. It is situated on the Sundquist Wildlife Management Area, 70,000 acres of a diverse array of habitats and wildlife. The WMA is also home to Tennessee’s Elk Reintroduction Program, and is the first and only public viewing area for elk in an authentic setting in the state.

Sours: https://twrf.net/elk-cam/

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