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omeprazole

What is the most important information I should know about omeprazole?

Omeprazole can cause kidney problems. Tell your doctor if you are urinating less than usual, or if you have blood in your urine.

Diarrhea may be a sign of a new infection. Call your doctor if you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it.

Omeprazole may cause new or worsening symptoms of lupus. Tell your doctor if you have joint pain and a skin rash on your cheeks or arms that worsens in sunlight.

You may be more likely to have a broken bone while taking this medicine long term or more than once per day.

What is omeprazole?

Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor that decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Omeprazole is used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions caused by excess stomach acid. Omeprazole is also used to promote healing of erosive esophagitis (damage to your esophagus caused by stomach acid).

Omeprazole may also be given together with antibiotics to treat gastric ulcer caused by infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori).

Over-the-counter (OTC) omeprazole is used in adults to help control heartburn that occurs 2 or more days per week. This medicine not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms. OTC omeprazole must be taken on a regular basis for 14 days in a row.

Omeprazole may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking omeprazole?

Heartburn can mimic early symptoms of a heart attack. Get emergency medical help if you have chest pain that spreads to your jaw or shoulder and you feel sweaty or light-headed.

You should not use omeprazole if you are allergic to it, or if:

  • you are also allergic to medicines like omeprazole, such as esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, Nexium, Prevacid, Protonix, and others; or
  • you also take HIV medication that contains rilpivirine (such as Complera, Edurant, Odefsey, Juluca).

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if this medicine is safe to use if you have:

  • trouble or pain with swallowing;
  • bloody or black stools, vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds;
  • heartburn that has lasted for over 3 months;
  • frequent chest pain, heartburn with wheezing;
  • unexplained weight loss;
  • nausea or vomiting, stomach pain;
  • liver disease;
  • low levels of magnesium in your blood; or
  • osteoporosis or low bone mineral density (osteopenia).

You may be more likely to have a broken bone in your hip, wrist, or spine while taking a proton pump inhibitor long-term or more than once per day. Talk with your doctor about ways to keep your bones healthy.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice.

How should I take omeprazole?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Use Prilosec OTC (over-the-counter) exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you do not understand these instructions.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) before you measure a dose. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon).

If you cannot swallow a capsule whole, open it and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of applesauce. Swallow the mixture right away without chewing. Do not save it for later use.

You must dissolve omeprazole powder in a small amount of water. This mixture can either be swallowed or given through a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube using a catheter-tipped syringe.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time, even if your symptoms quickly improve.

OTC omeprazole should be taken for only 14 days in a row. It may take 1 to 4 days before your symptoms improve. Allow at least 4 months to pass before you start a new 14-day course of treatment.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of omeprazole and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed.

This medicine can affect the results of certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using omeprazole.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking omeprazole?

This medicine can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, call your doctor before using anti-diarrhea medicine.

What other drugs will affect omeprazole?

Sometimes it is not safe to use certain medications at the same time. Some drugs can affect your blood levels of other drugs you take, which may increase side effects or make the medications less effective.

Tell your doctor about all your current medicines. Many drugs can affect omeprazole, especially:

  • clopidogrel;
  • methotrexate;
  • St. John's wort; or
  • an antibiotic --amoxicillin, clarithromycin, rifampin.

This list is not complete and many other drugs may affect omeprazole. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about omeprazole.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2021 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 20.01. Revision date: 4/11/2019.

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How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Omeprazole belongs to the family of medications called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). It slows or prevents the production of acid within the stomach.

Omeprazole is used to treat conditions where reduction in acid secretion is required for proper healing, including stomach and intestinal ulcers (gastric and duodenal ulcers), the prevention and treatment of ulcers associated with medications known as NSAIDs, reflux esophagitis, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, heartburn, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

It is also used in combination with antibiotics to treat stomach ulcers caused by H. pylori bacteria.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

Ran-Omeprazole is no longer being manufactured for sale in Canada. For brands that may still be available, search under omeprazole. This article is being kept available for reference purposes only. If you are using this medication, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for information about your treatment options.

How should I use this medication?

The usual recommended dose of omeprazole is 10 mg to 40 mg once daily. The dose and length of treatment depends on the condition being treated. This medication can be taken with or without food and should be swallowed whole with water.

When used to treat ulcers in the duodenum, the recommended adult dose is 20 mg taken once daily for 2 to 4 weeks.

To treat ulcers in the stomach, reflux esophagitis, and ulcers associated with the use of NSAIDs, the recommended adult dose is 20 mg taken once daily for 4 to 8 weeks.

For treatment of heartburn, the recommended adult dose is 20 mg daily.

When used to treat stomach ulcers caused by H. pylori in adults, the dose of omeprazole is 20 mg taken 2 times daily with 1,000 mg of amoxicillin 2 times daily and 500 mg of clarithromycin 2 times daily, all for 7 days. Another dosing regimen for H. pylori infections is 20 mg of omeprazole, 500 mg of metronidazole, and 250 mg of clarithromycin, all twice daily for 7 days.

If your ulcer continues to bother you, your doctor may suggest that you continue taking omeprazole for a period of time to make sure that your ulcer is fully healed.

When treating Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, the dose of omeprazole varies, but is often higher than the doses used to treat ulcers. Doses larger than 80 mg daily are often needed.

Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is less than 12 hours until your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from moisture, and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take this medication if you:

  • are allergic to omeprazole or any ingredients of this medication
  • are taking the medication rilpivirine
  • What side effects are possible with this medication?

    Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

    The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

    The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

    Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

    • abdominal or stomach pain
    • constipation
    • diarrhea or loose stools
    • dizziness
    • dry mouth
    • gas
    • headache
    • muscle weakness
    • nausea
    • sensation of spinning
    • sleepiness
    • trouble sleeping
    • vomiting

    Although most of these side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

    Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

    • blurred vision
    • diarrhea (watery and severe; may also be bloody)
    • increased sensitivity to sunlight
    • joint pain
    • mild skin rash or itching
    • mouth inflammation
    • muscle aches or cramps
    • pain or burning in the mouth or throat
    • rash on cheeks or arms that gets worse in the sun
    • sensation of burning, prickling, or numbness
    • signs of kidney problems (e.g., blood in the urine, decreased urine production)
    • signs of liver damage (yellow skin or eyes, dark urine, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, fever, and fatigue)

    Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

    • signs of an allergic reaction (e.g., difficulty breathing, hives, swelling of the face or throat)
    • signs of bleeding in the stomach (e.g., bloody, black, or tarry stools; spitting up of blood; vomiting blood or material that looks like coffee grounds)
    • signs of a severe skin reaction such as blistering, peeling, a rash covering a large area of the body, a rash that spreads quickly, or a rash combined with fever or discomfort

    Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

    Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

    Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

    Diarrhea: When gastric acid is decreased, the number of bacteria normally in the digestive system increases. Occasionally, this can cause serious infection in the digestive tract. If you experience watery, foul-smelling bowel movements after starting to take omeprazole, contact your doctor as soon as possible.

    Fluid and electrolyte balance: Omeprazole, like other PPIs, may cause the levels of electrolytes such as potassium, sodium, magnesium, chloride, and calcium in the blood to change while taking this medication. If you experience symptoms of fluid and electrolyte imbalance such as muscle pains or cramps; dry mouth; numb hands, feet, or lips; or racing heartbeat, contact your doctor as soon as possible. Your doctor will do blood tests regularly to monitor the levels of these electrolytes in your blood while you are taking this medication.

    Liver function: Liver disease or reduced liver function may cause this medication to build up in the body. If you have liver problems, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. Your doctor may want to test your liver function regularly with blood tests while you are taking this medication. People with severe liver disease should generally not take more than 20 mg of omeprazole daily.

    Methotrexate interaction: Omeprazole, like other medications in this group, may interact with methotrexate when the two medications are used at the same time. This combination may lead to higher than expected amounts of methotrexate in the body and can cause serious side effects, including kidney damage, irregular heartbeat, anemia, or infection. If you take omeprazole and are also going to receive a dose of methotrexate, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

    Osteoporosis-related fractures: Studies suggest that the use of omeprazole, like other PPIs, may be related to an increase risk of fractures, particularly for people who take this medication for a year or longer. The lowest dose of this medication to control the symptoms, taken for the shortest period of time is less likely to cause these problems.

    Severe stomach problems: If you have recurrent vomiting, difficulty swallowing, blood in the stool, coughing up of blood, or significant unintentional weight loss, check with your doctor immediately. These symptoms may be signs of a more serious stomach problem.

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE): Omeprazole, like other PPIs, has been rarely associated with SCLE, an autoimmune disease.  If you develop any skin lesions, especially in sun-exposed skin areas, and if accompanied by muscle aches or pains, contact your doctor immediately.

    Vitamin B12: Long-term use of omeprazole may lead to vitamin B12 deficiency. If you are a vegetarian or have low vitamin B12 levels, discuss with your doctor whether any special monitoring is required.

    Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, call your doctor immediately.

    Breast-feeding: This medication passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking omeprazole, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

    Children: The safety and effectiveness of using this medication have not been established for children.

    What other drugs could interact with this medication?

    There may be an interaction between omeprazole and any of the following:

    • amphetamines (e.g., dextroamphetamine, lisdexamfetamine)
    • apalutamide
    • "azole" antifungals (e.g., itraconazole, ketoconazole, voriconazole)
    • bisphosphonates (e.g., alendronate, etidronate, risedronate)
    • bosentan
    • cannabis
    • capecitabine
    • cefuroxime
    • clobazam
    • clopidogrel
    • clozapine
    • cyclosporine
    • dabigatran
    • dexmethylphenidate
    • digoxin
    • doxycycline
    • elagolix
    • enzalutamide
    • hepatitis C antivirals (e.g., dasabuvir, ledipasvir, ombitasvir, paritaprevir, ritonavir, velpatasvir)
    • HIV protease inhibitors (e.g., atazanavir, indinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir)
    • iron salts (e.g., ferrous fumarate, ferrous sulphate)
    • lumacaftor
    • mesalamine
    • methotrexate
    • methylphenidate
    • multivitamins with iron, folate
    • mycophenolate
    • pazopanib
    • phenytoin
    • protein kinase inhibitors (e.g., bosutinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, pazopanib)
    • raltegravir
    • rifampin
    • rilpivirine
    • riociguat
    • St. John's wort
    • SSRI antidepressants (e.g., citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine)
    • tacrolimus
    • warfarin

    If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

    • stop taking one of the medications,
    • change one of the medications to another,
    • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
    • leave everything as is.

    An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

    Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

    All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Ran-Omeprazole

Sours: https://www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/ran-omeprazole
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Raise your hand if you want to physically rip your throat out of your neck after eating a spicy meal—or, honestly, after eating anything at all. I feel you; heartburn is no joke. Luckily, there's a drug for that: omeprazole.

Omepra-what? You've probably heard of it as Prilosec or Zegerid—it's one of the most popular treatments for chronic heartburn. You can buy it over the counter any time you're having after-dinner indigestion, or if you've got a serious case of the burn, your doctor can prescribe you a stronger dosage.

The medicine's a type of drug called a "proton-pump inhibitor." Omeprazole works by blocking gastric acid secretion in your stomach which reduces heartburn, says Shilpa Ravella, M.D., a gastroenterologist and assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University Medical Center.

It can also be used to treat ulcers and to help patients with tumors that result in high levels of gastric acid secretion, she adds. Omeprazole can be used for a short period like a few weeks, or for a longer time, including lifetime use.

But whether you're just popping an OTC pill to help you get through a rough patch or you need to stay on it long-term, there are some side effects of omeprazole you should definitely know about.

You're always running to the toilet.

While most people do just fine on the medication, diarrhea is one of the most common side effects of omeprazole, Ravella says. Loose stools are never fun, but they should clear up on their own. If you're constantly tethered to the toilet, or if you see blood in your stool, it's time to give your doctor a call.

You can clear a room with your farts.

If the answer to "What's that smell?!" is you, it may be due to your medication, as gas is another common side effect, Ravella says. While it can be uncomfortable and embarrassing, it's probably not a big deal.

Your stomach is cramping and you feel nauseous.

Stomach pain and nausea are another relatively common side effect of omeprazole, Ravella says. This can be frustrating since the whole point of taking the meds is to help you eat with less pain, and if omeprazole is making your stomach hurt, you're just ruining your meal in a different way.

One possible remedy is to try taking the pill just before your meal instead of first thing in the morning, according to the Mayo Clinic. If the pain is so much that it's interfering with your ability to eat, then call your doctor right away.

Your head hurts so much, even Ellen annoys you.

Headaches are a potential side effect of many, many medications and antacids are no exception, Ravella says. If you feel like omperazole is causing or worsening your headaches, definitely let your doctor know as there are other medications you can try, she says.

You look sunburned, but haven't been anywhere fun.

Got red, itchy, patchy skin? A small number of women may develop a rash as a side effect of omperazole, Ravella says. If this is you, you should alert your doctor right away as this may indicate an allergic reaction to the medication.

You fall asleep watching your favorite show every. single. night.

Exhaustion, fatigue, and drowsiness have all been reported from using omperazole. But if you're feeling so wiped out not even an extra nap would help, it's time to raise the red flag. Any time a side effect of a medication is seriously impacting your life, you need to let your doctor know, Ravella says.

You just feel crappy all the time.

Using proton-pump inhibitors, especially long term, can put you at a higher risk for vitamin B12 deficiency, a serious bacterial infection called clostridium difficile, bone fractures, and possibly kidney disease, Ravella says. These are very rare side effects, but you want to know the scary stuff too, right? "Because of these safety concerns, I try to keep patients on omeprazole for the least amount of time needed," she says.

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So, so, continue to squeeze the pear until it is completely empty, Aunt Alya encouraged her. After about half a minute, the enema balloon became flat and empty. Take out the tip, just carefully, do not get your hands dirty and do not let go of the pear, Alina gave a new command. The niece listened to her, carefully removed the tip of the squeezed pear from the cousin's anus and showed the used.

Poop omeprazole

The boy had to obey. Well, how was the first procedure. "Asked Ira, who got up from the pot and tucked her pants.

What is Omeprazole?- Omeprazole and Acid Reflux - Food and drinks to avoid with stomach issues

"Zhenya quickly got rid of her pantyhose, then opened her bra, she took it off too (in Gena's opinion, her breasts were slightly smaller than Nadina's), after which she pulled down. Her panties the last part of her clothes on her naked body. apartments, however, m I can't convince my mother and grandmother of this.

Now discussing:

He smokes. Moved over. I lay down against the wall, almost pressed myself into it, so as not to touch it.



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