Video game etf 2020

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Best Gaming ETFs for Q4 2021

Gaming in the form of video games, eSports, and online gambling has soared in popularity in recent years, especially since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic that caused many consumers worldwide to begin working or sheltering at home. Investors seeking exposure to this trend can find several exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that hold baskets of gaming stocks. Gaming ETFs originally focused on casino and gambling companies, but they increasingly have broadened their scope to own stocks of companies involved in video games and eSports, as well as legal betting on professional sports.

Key Takeaways

  • The gaming industry can be represented by both the consumer discretionary and communications services sectors. The first sector has underperformed the broader market and the latter has outperformed.
  • The ETFs with the best 1-year trailing total return are BETZ, BJK, and HERO.
  • The top holdings of these ETFs are class A shares of Score Media and Gaming Inc., Flutter Entertainment PLC, and NVIDIA Corp., respectively.

Gaming stocks tend to fall into either the consumer discretionary or communications services sectors for gambling and video gaming companies, respectively. As such, there is no single benchmark that fully captures the performance of the gaming industry. The consumer discretionary has underperformed while the communications services sectors has outperformed the broader market in the past year. As of Aug. 27, the S&P 500 Consumer Discretionary Sector Index posted a 1-year trailing total return of 17.1% and the S&P 500 Communication Services Sector Index had a total return of 37.0%. By comparison the S&P 500 had a total return of 31.4%.

There are 5 ETFs that trade in the U.S. focused on the gaming industry, excluding inverse and leveraged funds, as well as those with under $50 million in assets under management (AUM). The best-performing gaming ETF for Q4 2021, based on performance over the past year, is the Roundhill Sports Betting & iGaming ETF (BETZ). We examine the top 3 best gaming ETFs below. All numbers below are as of Aug. 27, 2021.

Roundhill Sports Betting & iGaming ETF (BETZ)

  • Performance over 1-Year: 64.2%
  • Expense Ratio: 0.75%
  • Annual Dividend Yield: 0.23%
  • 3-Month Average Daily Volume: 161,526
  • Assets Under Management: $389.3 million
  • Inception Date: June 4, 2020
  • Issuer: Roundhill Investments

BETZ tracks the Roundhill Sports Betting & iGaming Index, which is designed to gauge the performance of the sports betting and iGaming industry. The ETF provides exposure to companies that operate in-person or online sports books, online gambling platforms, and companies that provide infrastructure or technology to the sports betting and online gaming industry. The fund is geographically diversified across a number of developed markets, though U.S.-based companies receive the largest allocation. It follows a blended strategy, investing in a mix of growth and value stocks across the market cap spectrum. The fund's top three holdings include class A shares of Score Media and Gaming Inc. (SCR:TSE), a Canada-based digital media company that provides sports media, betting, and eSports; class A shares of Rush Street Interactive Inc. (RSI), a gaming company that offers online casinos and sports betting; and class A shares of DraftKings Inc. (DKNG), a digital sports entertainment and gaming company that offers a fantasy sports platform.

VanEck Vectors Gaming ETF (BJK)

  • Performance over 1-Year: 31.5%
  • Expense Ratio: 0.65%
  • Annual Dividend Yield: 0.44%
  • 3-Month Average Daily Volume: 28,680
  • Assets Under Management: $127.6 million
  • Inception Date: Jan. 22, 2008
  • Issuer: VanEck

BJK tracks the MVIS Global Gaming Index, which is designed to represent the performance of companies involved in casinos and casino hotels, sports betting, lottery services, gaming services, gaming technology, and gaming equipment. The ETF provides exposure to companies deriving at least 50% of their revenue from operations engaged in the global gaming industry. Most of the fund's holdings are companies operating within the consumer discretionary sector. Nearly half of its holdings are based in the U.S. The rest are geographically diversified and are located in a number of countries throughout the world. The multi-cap fund employs a blended strategy of investing in both value and growth stocks. Its top three holdings include Flutter Entertainment PLC (FLTR:DUB), an Ireland-based provider of mobile and online gambling services; class A shares of DraftKings; and Evolution AB (EVO:OME), a Sweden-based provider of live casino solutions to online casino operators.

Global X Video Games & Esports ETF (HERO)

  • Performance over 1-Year: 11.8%
  • Expense Ratio: 0.50%
  • Annual Dividend Yield: 0.78%
  • 3-Month Average Daily Volume: 138,683
  • Assets Under Management: $557.8 million
  • Inception Date: Oct. 25, 2019
  • Issuer: Mirae Asset Global Investments Co., Ltd.

HERO tracks the Solactive Video Games & Esports Index, designed to gauge the performance of companies operating within the global video games and eSports markets. The ETF is designed to provide exposure to companies that develop or publish video games, facilitate content streaming and distribution, own and operate within competitive eSports leagues, or produce hardware for video games and eSports. The fund's holdings primarily operate within the communication services, information technology, or consumer discretionary sector. HERO also offers broad geographical diversification even though more than 60% of its holdings are of companies that are based in either the U.S. or Japan. The multi-cap fund is focused on stocks with high growth potential. Its top three holdings include NVIDIA Corp. (NVDA), a multinational technology company that designs graphics processing units (GPUs); class A sponsored ADRs of Sea Ltd. (Singapore) (SE), a Singapore-based provider of digital entertainment, e-commerce, and digital financial services; and Electronic Arts Inc. (EA), a global video game company.

The comments, opinions and analyses expressed herein are for informational purposes only and should not be considered individual investment advice or recommendations to invest in any security or to adopt any investment strategy. While we believe the information provided herein is reliable, we do not warrant its accuracy or completeness. The views and strategies described on our content may not be suitable for all investors. Because market and economic conditions are subject to rapid change, all comments, opinions, and analyses contained within our content are rendered as of the date of the posting and may change without notice. The material is not intended as a complete analysis of every material fact regarding any country, region, market, industry, investment, or strategy.

Sours: https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/010616/top-4-entertainment-etfs-2016-pej-xly.asp

4 Gaming ETFs to Play in 2020

It’s no secret anymore that gaming, or esports, is big business and that trend should continue in 2020. That said, investors should keep gaming-focused ETFs on their watch lists for the new year.

“Today, the gaming industry is not just about a time-killing fun thing, in fact, it is now a million-dollar worth industry,” a Business Matters article noted. “With mobile gambling apps and online video gaming platform, you can make thousands of dollars in no time. There are certain ways through which you can make money through this industry and live a life of fortune.”

The article went on to note that areas that will continue growing within the gaming sector include development, content creation, in-game sales, online coaching, and esports careers.

“Making money in the eSports industry is a highly obtainable goal, all you need to do is find the correct option you are passionate about and take the risk, the article added. “Without risk, no one can ever be successful therefore it is the time to do something and make a fortune from eSports.”

ETF investors willing to play the gaming sector in 2020 would be keen to check out these 4 funds:

  1. VanEck Vectors Video Gaming and eSports ETF (NasdaqGM: ESPO): With over $56 million in assets under management, ESPO is the biggest of the four. It seeks to replicate as closely as possible the price and yield performance of the MVIS® Global Video Gaming & eSports Index. The index is a global index that tracks the performance of the global video gaming and eSports (also known as electronic sports) segment.
  2. VanEck Vectors Gaming ETF (NasdaqGM: BJK): BJK is runner up in terms of size with over $27 million in assets. The fund seeks to replicate as closely as possible the price and yield performance of the MVIS® Global Gaming Index. For index eligibility, companies must generate at least 50% of their revenues from gaming. Gaming includes casinos and casino hotels, sports betting (including internet gambling and racetracks) and lottery services as well as gaming services, gaming technology and gaming equipment.
  3. Roundhill BITKRAFT Esports & Digital Entertainment ETF (NYSEArca: NERD): NERD doesn’t have the asset size of the first two funds, but it’s still worth a look given its current price of $15.74 as of Dec. 18. It seeks to track the total return performance of the Roundhill BITKRAFT Esports Index, which tracks the performance of the common stock of exchange-listed companies across the globe that earn revenue from electronic sports, or esports related business activities.
  4. Defiance NextGen Video Gaming ETF (NYSEArca: VIDG): VIDG is the smallest in terms of assets under management, but still worth a look. It seeks to track the total return performance of the BlueStar Next Gen Video Gaming Index, which consists of a modified market capitalization-weighted portfolio of the stock of companies whose products or services are predominantly tied to video gaming.

For more market trends, visit ETF Trends.

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Sours: https://www.etftrends.com/equity-etf-channel/4-gaming-etfs-to-play-in-2020/
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Gaming ETF List

This is a list of all Gaming ETFs traded in the USA which are currently tagged by ETF Database. Please note that the list may not contain newly issued ETFs. If you’re looking for a more simplified way to browse and compare ETFs, you may want to visit our ETF Database Categories, which categorize every ETF in a single “best fit” category.

* Assets and Average Volume as of 2021-10-12 16:30 EDT

This page includes historical return information for all Gaming ETFs listed on U.S. exchanges that are currently tracked by ETF Database.

The table below includes fund flow data for all U.S. listed Gaming ETFs. Total fund flow is the capital inflow into an ETF minus the capital outflow from the ETF for a particular time period.

Fund Flows in millions of U.S. Dollars.

The following table includes expense data and other descriptive information for all Gaming ETFs listed on U.S. exchanges that are currently tracked by ETF Database. In addition to expense ratio and issuer information, this table displays platforms that offer commission-free trading for certain ETFs.

Clicking on any of the links in the table below will provide additional descriptive and quantitative information on Gaming ETFs.

The following table includes ESG Scores and other descriptive information for all Gaming ETFs listed on U.S. exchanges that are currently tracked by ETF Database. Easily browse and evaluate ETFs by visiting our ESG Investing themes section and find ETFs that map to various environmental, social, governance and morality themes.

This page includes historical dividend information for all Gaming ETFs listed on U.S. exchanges that are currently tracked by ETF Database. Note that certain ETPs may not make dividend payments, and as such some of the information below may not be meaningful.

The table below includes basic holdings data for all U.S. listed Gaming ETFs that are currently tagged by ETF Database. The table below includes the number of holdings for each ETF and the percentage of assets that the top ten assets make up, if applicable. For more detailed holdings information for any ETF, click on the link in the right column.

The following table includes certain tax information for all Gaming ETFs listed on U.S. exchanges that are currently tracked by ETF Database, including applicable short-term and long-term capital gains rates and the tax form on which gains or losses in each ETF will be reported.

This page contains certain technical information for all Gaming ETFs that are listed on U.S. exchanges and tracked by ETF Database. Note that the table below only includes limited technical indicators; click on the “View” link in the far right column for each ETF to see an expanded display of the product’s technicals.

This page provides links to various analysis for all Gaming ETFs that are listed on U.S. exchanges and tracked by ETF Database. The links in the table below will guide you to various analytical resources for the relevant ETF, including an X-ray of holdings, official fund fact sheet, or objective analyst report.

This page provides ETF Database Ratings for all Gaming ETFs that are listed on U.S. exchanges and tracked by ETF Database. The ETF Database Ratings are transparent, quant-based evaluations of ETFs relative to other products in the same ETF Database Category. As such, it should be noted that this page may include ETFs from multiple ETF Database Categories.

Sours: https://etfdb.com/etfs/industry/gaming/

Are These Top Gaming ETFs Still a Good Buy Post-Pandemic?

Investors are on the lookout for long term investment opportunities in online betting and gaming, a massively growing industry. However, identifying the best players in the industry and the inherent risks associated with uncertain growth can be daunting. In a recent article, I suggested exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that might help lessen the risk of investing in that sector, and I focused primarily on ETFs that have holdings in sportsbooks, online gambling platforms, and technology infrastructure.

That said, if you're interested in getting a piece of the action specifically in gaming with more holdings related to publishers, game developers, and equipment companies, but aren't sure which companies might come out ahead, here are a few more ETFs that might suit your portfolio.

Young gamers celebrating victory while wearing pandemic masks.

Image source: Getty Images.

eSports leads the way

The VanEck Vectors Video Gaming and eSports ETF(NASDAQ:ESPO) provides investors with top holdings in some extremely successful U.S. companies, such as semi-conductor leaders NVIDIA and Applied Micro Devices, in addition to game publishers, including Activision, Electronic Arts, and Take-Two Interactive. Other international holdings of well-known companies in the gaming space include Tencent Holdings and Nintendo.

The ETF asset weight in ESPO is spread fairly evenly, with the top 10 holdings all in a range from 4.5% to 9%. Globally, the holdings are spread out as well, with the highest percentage of companies located in the U.S., followed by Japan, and China leading the rest of the group.

The ESPO ETF is a newbie in the history of ETFs, having only been around since 2018, but of the three this article focuses on. it's actually the oldest. So the tracking of performance is somewhat limited. Having said that, it is coming off a year in which it saw a 69% total annual return. In a more recent view, it has claimed a 4% return in the past month after a slow start to 2021. By comparison, the S&P 500 is leading the ESPO ETF by an 11% to 1% count for year-to-date returns.

A hero in the making

A similar option to ESPO is the creatively labeled ticker symbol, HERO. TheGlobal X Video Games & Esports ETF (NASDAQ:HERO) has its key holdings focused on many of the same top 10 holdings as ESPO. In fact, seven of the 10 are the same, with one difference worth mentioning: HERO has a 5% asset weight in Zynga (NASDAQ:ZNGA), a Motley Fool recommended stock.

Like ESPO, HERO's top held companies are located primarily in the U.S. and Japan, with China and South Korea leading the rest of the group. The sector weight differs from ESPO. Notwithstanding the similarities in top 10 holdings, HERO has an evenly spread sector weighting, with consumer discretionary, communication services, and information technology all coming in at above 30% weight. By comparison, ESPO focuses primarily on communication services, at a rate of 71%, followed by information technology at 24%.

HERO has experienced slightly better performance for the past year, gaining 84% in total returns and a 67% total return since inception. But HERO is even younger than its VanEck counterpart, having only been around since October of 2019.

A cool nerd

Rounding out our three ETFs is The Roundhill BITKRAFT Esports & Digital Entertainment ETF(NYSEMKT:NERD), also quite new on the scene for ETF investing. The fund has been around since June 2019, and is designed to follow the performance of the Roundhill BITKRAFT Esports Index. The index focuses its portfolio on companies in competitive video gaming, including publishers, streaming network operators, league operators, and hardware companies.

NERD has been popular in its total returns, resulting in a 127% growth across the past year, and 52% since inception. Although it doesn't boast names like NVIDIA or Nintendo in its top 10 holdings, it does have similarities to its counterpart ETFs. Most notably, its highest asset weight belongs to Activision. It also likes Tencent, Electronic Arts, and Take-Two.

Where it differs is in its second and third leading holdings, Modern Times Group and Corsair Gaming. They are each at 5% weight, which both had excellent growth from the dip in early 2020 and through the end of the year.

But 2021 is telling the same not-so-great story that it did for ESPO and HERO. Year-to-date returns are basically flat to negative, and the trend has been heading downward. With both Modern Times Group and Corsair on a downward trend as individual stocks, it could be a bitter pill for investors to swallow if these don't turn around soon or a change is made to the asset weight per holding.

Where to turn

As we've experienced global lockdowns for the past year, a massive jump in performance of the MVIS Global Video Gaming and eSports Index has taken place. Dating back to the second half of 2018, the Index was up 29% as of the start of the public pandemic in the U.S. Since then, it has grown to 113% as of January of this year. By comparison, the S&P 500 was up 25% in early 2020, growing to 40% in January.

The number of gaming players and revenue generated from gaming have been growing tremendously over the past few years. This is expected to continue at even larger increments through 2023, based on a 2020 Newzoo global esports market report. Revenue is expected to climb by 25%, to $217 billion, while the number of global players is projected to spread at a rate of 14%, bringing the total number of players to over three billion.

For those who might look at dividends as a deciding factor, NERD tops the list with a payout of $0.32 in 2020, following $0.05 in 2019. HERO comes in second with a $0.21 annual dividend, after paying $0.04 the previous year. And ESPO places third, but with more consistency, paying an annual dividend of $0.09 for the past two consecutive years.

Two obstacles to overcome are that the short-term trend is not all that enticing, based on the recent ETF returns, and that it's yet to be certain how the the post-pandemic world will affect companies that performed well, such as some in gaming, during lockdowns. Second-quarter numbers should help provide some additional direction.

For investors looking longer-term, three to five years out, grabbing a trial size of shares in one of these gaming ETFs could be the way to go for now. If you're looking for a good mix of holdings, recent returns, dividend consistency, and age, ESPO might be a good start.

Sours: https://www.fool.com/investing/2021/05/27/are-these-top-gaming-etfs-still-a-good-buy-post-pa/

Game 2020 video etf

This article was originally published on ETFTrends.com.

It’s no secret anymore that gaming, or esports, is big business and that trend should continue in 2020. That said, investors should keep gaming-focused ETFs on their watch lists for the new year.

“Today, the gaming industry is not just about a time-killing fun thing, in fact, it is now a million-dollar worth industry,” a Business Matters article noted. “With mobile gambling apps and online video gaming platform, you can make thousands of dollars in no time. There are certain ways through which you can make money through this industry and live a life of fortune.”

The article went on to note that areas that will continue growing within the gaming sector include development, content creation, in-game sales, online coaching, and esports careers.

“Making money in the eSports industry is a highly obtainable goal, all you need to do is find the correct option you are passionate about and take the risk, the article added. “Without risk, no one can ever be successful therefore it is the time to do something and make a fortune from eSports.”

ETF investors willing to play the gaming sector in 2020 would be keen to check out these 4 funds:

  1. VanEck Vectors Video Gaming and eSports ETF (ESPO) : With over $56 million in assets under management, ESPO is the biggest of the four. It seeks to replicate as closely as possible the price and yield performance of the MVIS® Global Video Gaming & eSports Index. The index is a global index that tracks the performance of the global video gaming and eSports (also known as electronic sports) segment.

  2. VanEck Vectors Gaming ETF (BJK) : BJK is runner up in terms of size with over $27 million in assets. The fund seeks to replicate as closely as possible the price and yield performance of the MVIS® Global Gaming Index. For index eligibility, companies must generate at least 50% of their revenues from gaming. Gaming includes casinos and casino hotels, sports betting (including internet gambling and racetracks) and lottery services as well as gaming services, gaming technology and gaming equipment.

  3. Roundhill BITKRAFT Esports & Digital Entertainment ETF (NERD) : NERD doesn’t have the asset size of the first two funds, but it’s still worth a look given its current price of $15.74 as of Dec. 18. It seeks to track the total return performance of the Roundhill BITKRAFT Esports Index, which tracks the performance of the common stock of exchange-listed companies across the globe that earn revenue from electronic sports, or esports related business activities.

  4. Defiance NextGen Video Gaming ETF (VIDG) : VIDG is the smallest in terms of assets under management, but still worth a look. It seeks to track the total return performance of the BlueStar Next Gen Video Gaming Index, which consists of a modified market capitalization-weighted portfolio of the stock of companies whose products or services are predominantly tied to video gaming.

For more market trends, visit ETF Trends.

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Sours: https://www.yahoo.com/now/4-gaming-etfs-play-2020-160106005.html
BEST 10 ETF OF 2020 (JAN - JUN) Do you OWN ANY?

Video Games & Esports ETF

Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. The investable universe of companies in which HERO may invest may be limited. Video Game and Esports Companies are subject to risks associated with additional regulatory oversight with regard to privacy/cybersecurity concerns, shifting consumer preferences, and potential licensing challenges. The Fund invests in securities of companies engaged in Information Technology, which can be affected by rapid product obsolescence and intense industry competition. International investments may involve risk of capital loss from unfavorable fluctuation in currency values, from differences in generally accepted accounting principles or from social, economic or political instability in other nations. HERO is non-diversified.

Shares of ETFs are bought and sold at market price (not NAV) and are not individually redeemed from the Fund. Brokerage commissions will reduce returns. Beginning October 15, 2020, market price returns are based on the official closing price of an ETF share or, if the official closing price isn’t available, the midpoint between the national best bid and national best offer (“NBBO”) as of the time the ETF calculates current NAV per share. Prior to October 15, 2020, market price returns were based on the midpoint between the Bid and Ask price. NAVs are calculated using prices as of 4:00 PM Eastern Time. The returns shown do not represent the returns you would receive if you traded shares at other times. Indices are unmanaged and do not include the effect of fees, expenses or sales charges. One cannot invest directly in an index.

Since the Fund’s shares did not trade in the secondary market until several days after the Fund’s inception, for the period from inception to the first day of secondary market trading in Shares, the NAV of the Fund is used to calculate market returns.

Carefully consider the Fund’s investment objectives, risks, and charges and expenses before investing. This and other information can be found in the Fund’s summary or full prospectuses. Please read the prospectus carefully before investing.

Global X Management Company LLC serves as an advisor to Global X Funds. The Funds are distributed by SEI Investments Distribution Co. (SIDCO), which is not affiliated with Global X Management Company LLC or Mirae Asset Global Investments. Global X Funds are not sponsored, endorsed, issued, sold or promoted by Solactive AG, nor does Solactive AG make any representations regarding the advisability of investing in the Global X Funds. Neither SIDCO, Global X nor Mirae Asset Global Investments are affiliated with Solactive AG.

Sours: https://www.globalxetfs.com/funds/hero/

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