Holley brawler 750

Holley brawler 750 DEFAULT

750 CFM Brawler Street Carburetor Mechanical Secondary

3

This part is legal for sale and use on Uncontrolled (Non-Emissions Controlled) Vehicles and Racing Use Only Vehicles.

The following vehicles are considered Uncontrolled (Non-Emissions Controlled) Vehicles:

  • 1965 and older U.S. manufactured California Certified vehicles
  • 1967 and older U.S. manufactured Federally Certified vehicles
  • 1967 and older Foreign manufactured vehicle

The following vehicles are considered Racing Use Only Vehicles:

  • Racing Use Only Vehicles are vehicles that are used exclusively for competition and that are not registered and that may never be used on the street

WARNING: It is against the law to install this part on an Emissions Controlled Vehicle

The following vehicles are considered Emissions Controlled Vehicles:

  • 1966 and newer U.S. manufactured California Certified vehicles
  • 1968 and newer U.S. manufactured Federally Certified vehicles
  • 1968 and newer Foreign manufactured vehicle
Sours: https://www.holley.com/products/fuel_systems/carburetors/street/parts/BR-67213

We Dyno Test Holley’s New Low-Cost Brawler Carb vs The XP!

| How-To - Engine and Drivetrain

Speed costs. How fast do you want to go? The saying has been around for as long as the automobile, but it still holds true today. We all want to go fast, but the funds for the fun are hard to come by. For most of us, the desire is big, but the bank account, no so much! This test is tailor made for the Car Crafty, bang-for-the-buck performance enthusiasts. What better way to show that it is possible to get more for less, than by directly comparing some unsuspecting, high-dollar component to a low-buck alternative? Obviously, it wouldn't be much of a story if the high-dollar part KO'd the low-bucker, but this test was as much about product application as it was cost. Besides, we were every bit as curious to find out if the tried-and-true Holley 750 Ultra XP we normally run on our test motors at Westech could be replaced by a less expensive version, all without sacrificing power, of course. Since Holley also offered an affordable 750 Brawler series carburetor, it was time for a good old-fashion carb-on-carb brawl, ya'll!

Running a pair of carbs on a test engine was simple enough, but instead of running the usual 350 Chevy, or even LS power plant, we chose a Ford. Covered in plastic and almost a decade worth of dust was a 351 Windsor. This particular 351 started out life as a 385hp crate motor offered by Ford Racing back in the day. The crate motor featured a 5.8L Sportsman block stuffed with a cast crank and rods, but did include forged (dish) pistons. When combined with the GT-40 aluminum heads, the 351W offered a boost-friendly 9:1 compression ratio (a little foreshadowing here).

Though we ran this test on a crate motor, the same results could be found on a 5.8L yanked from a late-model F150 truck (for $200-$300) from a local wrecking yard. We are certainly a fan of the smaller 5.0L Ford, but a stock 351 is actually a much better choice because it offers improved block strength. We have exceeded 1,000 hp using a stock 351 block, but a stock 302 block will tap out long before reaching that number. The Sportsman block is even stronger than the stock unit, so we had no strength concerns running our mild Windsor combination.

The Ford Racing 351W crate motor was originally equipped with a set of GT-40 heads, a mild cam, and single-plane Victor Jr. intake. When run with a Holley carb and headers, the crate motor was rated at 385 hp and 377 lb-ft of torque. Having seen more than its fair share of testing since new, this particular 351W was now sporting some unknown, mild cam profile and a set of now-discontinued Holley aluminum heads. Having tested these heads back in the day, we know they were at least the equivalent of the GT-40 aluminum heads, but it mattered not what the exact configuration was. The important consideration was the current power output, as this all but determined the proper carburetor. From a most basic standpoint, carburetion is a function of power output, with high-power combos requiring larger, higher-flowing carburetors. This mild 351W combination produced less than 425 hp, so we chose to test a pair of 750cfm carburetors. In truth, 650 Holleys might work equally well on this mild application, but the 750 units would provide room to grow, should we opt to upgrade to wilder cam timing and/or cylinder heads at a later date.

In terms of carburetors, we selected our go-to Holley 750 Ultra XP carburetor. The XP-series offered a number of desirable features, including increased fuel bowl capacity, reduced weight (by 38 percent), and billet metering blocks and base plate. The high-flow XP series also featured contoured venturi inlets, four-corner idle circuits, and notched floats for jet extensions. Also equipped with high-speed air bleeds for precise fuel control, the XP series is what any self-respecting enthusiasts should choose for a high-performance race or street/strip application when you go looking for the absolute maximum amount of power from your combination. The current pricing (through Summit Racing) for the Holley Ultra XP carburetor was $781. By contrast, the 750 Brawler series could be had for the paltry sum of $385, but does that mean Holley eliminated all the cool stuff from the low-buck carb? As it turned out, the answer was "no," as the Brawler also featured things like down-leg boosters, billet metering blocks and base plate, and high-speed air bleeds. In fact, given the same size throttle openings, the only major difference seemed to be the choke horn used on the Brawler carb. The question now was, did said choke horn represent a restriction to airflow at this power level?

To find out, we ran the modified 351W crate motor with both carburetors, starting with the 750 Ultra XP. Once we dialed in the jetting (the carb was used a lot on other combinations), we were eventually rewarded with peak numbers of 420 hp at 6,100 rpm and 429 lb-ft of torque at 4,300 rpm. After installation of the Brawler carb, we dialed in the air fuel to match the XP carb and were rewarded with identical peak power numbers, though the peak torque for the Brawler came at 4,200 rpm. The power curves were all but identical with the two carbs. This, of course, doesn't mean the Brawler is a substitute for the Ultra XP in all applications, but it does mean the Ultra XP version is an unnecessary expense on a mild street application. In fact, we can argue that the choke adds value to the Brawler for any kind of real daily driver, as these vehicles are forced to deal with all types of weather, and a choke makes cold starts much easier. This carb test was actually just the tip of the iceberg for our 351W, as we previously tested headers and plan on comparing intakes, nitrous and even a centrifugal supercharger. Check back with us to see how things worked out.

On The Dyno
Holley 750 Ultra XP versus 750 Brawler
Ford 351W (Modified)

As is evident by the graph, there was little to choose from between the 750 Ultra XP and the 750 Brawler. Though some of us were concerned about the choke horn limiting airflow on the Brawler, the reality is that the 750cfm Brawler offered more than enough flow to feed our mild Windsor combination. That is really the key to success when choosing a carburetor for any application. Were this a 600hp Windsor stroker, we suspect the results might be different, as that power level might tax the flow limits of the carburetors and allow the extra power potential of the XP version to shine. It's all about choosing the right carb for the right combo, and the low-buck Brawler was perfect for our mild crate motor.

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Sours: https://www.motortrend.com/how-to/dyno-test-holleys-new-low-cost-brawler-carb-vs-xp/
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750 CFM Brawler Race Carburetor Mechanical Secondary

3

This part is legal for sale and use on Uncontrolled (Non-Emissions Controlled) Vehicles and Racing Use Only Vehicles.

The following vehicles are considered Uncontrolled (Non-Emissions Controlled) Vehicles:

  • 1965 and older U.S. manufactured California Certified vehicles
  • 1967 and older U.S. manufactured Federally Certified vehicles
  • 1967 and older Foreign manufactured vehicle

The following vehicles are considered Racing Use Only Vehicles:

  • Racing Use Only Vehicles are vehicles that are used exclusively for competition and that are not registered and that may never be used on the street

WARNING: It is against the law to install this part on an Emissions Controlled Vehicle

The following vehicles are considered Emissions Controlled Vehicles:

  • 1966 and newer U.S. manufactured California Certified vehicles
  • 1968 and newer U.S. manufactured Federally Certified vehicles
  • 1968 and newer Foreign manufactured vehicle
Sours: https://www.holley.com/products/fuel_systems/carburetors/street_strip/parts/BR-67200

750 CFM Brawler Diecast Carburetor Mechanical Secondary

3

This part is legal for sale and use on Uncontrolled (Non-Emissions Controlled) Vehicles and Racing Use Only Vehicles.

The following vehicles are considered Uncontrolled (Non-Emissions Controlled) Vehicles:

  • 1965 and older U.S. manufactured California Certified vehicles
  • 1967 and older U.S. manufactured Federally Certified vehicles
  • 1967 and older Foreign manufactured vehicle

The following vehicles are considered Racing Use Only Vehicles:

  • Racing Use Only Vehicles are vehicles that are used exclusively for competition and that are not registered and that may never be used on the street

WARNING: It is against the law to install this part on an Emissions Controlled Vehicle

The following vehicles are considered Emissions Controlled Vehicles:

  • 1966 and newer U.S. manufactured California Certified vehicles
  • 1968 and newer U.S. manufactured Federally Certified vehicles
  • 1968 and newer Foreign manufactured vehicle
Sours: https://www.holley.com/products/fuel_systems/carburetors/street/parts/BR-67257

750 holley brawler

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Brawler Carburetors

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Water hit the wicked beast's brush, deflecting fire from Ralph and knocking the sword out of the hands of the villain.



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