Nj unemployment benefits

Nj unemployment benefits DEFAULT

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INFORMATION FOR JOBSEEKERS: Visit CareerServices.nj.gov to learn more about the resources and trainings that are available to get you started on your next career opportunity. This includes access to more than 5,000 free online courses, our Job Source search tool, and one-on-one virtual support.


FEDERAL EXTENDED UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS EXPIRED ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2021: Please note that you will still be able to receive benefits for weeks prior to September 4, if you are found eligible for a claim filed before September 4, 2021. Any funds that appear as remaining in your unemployment account related to these federal programs will not be available for certification or payment for weeks of unemployment ending after September 4, 2021. Learn more about state extended unemployment benefits here.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AND SUPPORT: Click here for links to assistance with food, housing, child care, health, and more.



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Sours: https://www.nj.gov/labor/

Justice News

NEWARK, N.J. – A Union, New Jersey, man today admitted that he illegally obtained more than $450,000 in unemployment insurance benefits, Acting U.S. Attorney Rachael A. Honig announced. 

Maurice Mills, 29, of Union, New Jersey, pleaded guilty by videoconference before U.S. District Judge Brian Martinotti to an information charging him with wire fraud.

According to documents filed in the case and statements made in court:

On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) was signed into law. The CARES Act created a new temporary federal unemployment insurance program called Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), which provides unemployment insurance benefits (UIB) for individuals who were not eligible for other types of unemployment (e.g., the self-employed, independent contractors, gig economy workers). The CARES Act also created a new temporary federal program called Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation that provides additional benefits to those eligible for PUA and regular UIB. The New York State Department of Labor administers and manages the regular unemployment and PUA programs in the State of New York.

Between August and September of 2020, Mills submitted fraudulent UIB applications to the State of New York using the names of other individuals. As a result, the State of New York approved and provided, and Mills falsely obtained, more than $450,000 in UIB.

The charge of wire fraud is punishable by a maximum potential penalty of 20 years in prison and a fine of $250,000, or twice the gross profits to Mills or loss suffered by the victims, whichever is greatest. Sentencing is scheduled for Feb. 3, 2022.

Acting U.S. Attorney Honig credited special agents of the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Inspector General, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Jonathan Mellone in Manhattan; special agents of the FBI, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge George M. Crouch Jr., in Newark; postal inspectors of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, under the direction of Acting Inspector in Charge Raimundo Marrero in Newark; and special agents of the U.S. Secret Service, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Mark McKevitt in Newark, with the investigation leading to today’s arrest. She also thanked the New York State Department of Labor, Office of Special Investigations for its assistance in the investigation.

The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrew Kogan of the U.S. Attorney’s Office Cybercrime Unit in Newark. 

Sours: https://www.justice.gov/usao-nj/pr/new-jersey-man-admits-stealing-more-450000-unemployment-insurance-benefits
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State of New Jersey SealOfficial Site of The State of New Jersey

INFORMATION FOR JOBSEEKERS: Visit CareerServices.nj.gov to learn more about the resources and trainings that are available to get you started on your next career opportunity. This includes access to more than 5,000 free online courses, our Job Source search tool, and one-on-one virtual support.


CERTIFICATION SCHEDULE:Check the schedule to find the correct time slot to certify for benefits based on your Social Security Number (SSN).


FEDERAL EXTENDED UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS EXPIRED ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2021: Please note that you will still be able to receive benefits for weeks prior to September 4, if you are found eligible for a claim filed before September 4, 2021. Any funds that appear as remaining in your unemployment account related to these federal programs will not be available for certification or payment for weeks of unemployment ending after September 4, 2021. Learn more about state extended unemployment benefits here.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AND SUPPORT: Click here for links to assistance with food, housing, child care, health, and more.

Sours: https://myunemployment.nj.gov/

State of New Jersey SealOfficial Site of The State of New Jersey

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 22, 2021

TRENTON – The number of new unemployment claims fell for the second straight week last week – to 10,534* – which is about 130,000 fewer weekly claims than the Department of Labor and Workforce Development reported for the same week a year ago, at the height of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Also last week, New Jersey triggered off of federal High Extended Benefits, which afforded an additional seven weeks of extended benefits to eligible claimants. High Extended Benefits – which increases the duration of extended benefits from 13 to 20 weeks – is triggered when the state’s three-month average unemployment rate is 8 percent or higher. The average for the past three months in New Jersey is 7.7 percent. 

Claims impacted by this status change will be automatically and seamlessly moved on to Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) to continue receiving their remaining benefits. No action by claimants is needed. In essence, there will be no affect on claimants through Sept. 4, when PEUC and other pandemic rescue programs expire.  

For the week ending April 17, new unemployment claims declined by 7 percent from the prior week, when a 43 percent drop was reported. The Department has received 2,125,289** initial unemployment claims since the pandemic struck the state’s workforce last year, including 140,139 new claims for the week ending April 18, 2020.  

The Department distributed $416 million in benefits last week, for a cumulative total of $26.9 billion dispensed to jobless New Jersey workers. The average claimant in New Jersey has received $17,827 in benefits.  

“New Jersey is leading the way on many fronts in getting benefits to workers, but we know this is no solace to those waiting for a determination or a better understanding of the status of their claim,” said Labor Commissioner Robert Asaro-Angelo. “This continues to motivate our teams to try so hard to determine that workers are eligible, and to deliver benefits as quickly as possible them.” 

NJDOL has also begun verifying the wages of Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) recipients, as per federal law. The Continued Assistance for Unemployed Workers Act of 2020 requires independent contractors, self-employed individuals and others receiving PUA to submit proof of income to continue to receiving benefits. These claimants are being notified via email with detailed instructions and deadlines. 

Here are the week-by-week totals of new unemployment claims:

Here is the breakdown of weekly benefits payments to eligible New Jersey workers:  


The American Rescue Plan signed March 11 extends Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), PEUC and Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) – the $300 supplement – to eligible claimants for 25 weeks, through Sept. 4.  

The maximum eligibility for PUA is now 75 weeks. PEUC now provides up to 49 weeks of additional benefits to those who exhaust 26 weeks of state unemployment. Extended benefits (EB) adds 13 weeks. The $300 FPUC supplement is for anyone collecting unemployment in any amount during eligible weeks. There is also a provision in the new rescue law that excludes the first $10,200 of unemployment benefits from having to be reported as income on federal taxes for households earning less than $150,000/year. 

For more information on state or federal unemployment benefits, visit myunemployment.nj.gov.       

Information on virtual Career Services can be found here: nj.gov/labor/career-services. 

Visit New Jersey’s jobs portal here: jobs.covid19.nj.gov.       

For national unemployment data, visit https://www.dol.gov/ui/data.pdf. For archived NJ claims data, visit https://oui.doleta.gov/unemploy/DataDashboard.asp.      

*This represents the final number for the week ending April 17. The number listed for New Jersey by the US Department of Labor – 9,527– is based on advanced reporting.    

**The number of new initial claims includes 258,629 claims that have been reopened by residents who returned to unemployment after a period of employment within a calendar year, as well as claims that turned out to be fraudulent. 

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Sours: https://www.nj.gov/labor/lwdhome/press/2021/20210422_paymentsupdate.shtml

Benefits nj unemployment

New Jersey residents who still rely on extended unemployment benefits issued in response to the coronavirus pandemic will lose the benefits next week after they expire, Gov. Phil Murphy said during his regular COVID-19 briefing on Monday.

Murphy’s decision to buck President Joe Biden’s suggestion that states could use COVID relief funds to extend benefits beyond the Sept. 4 expiration date will affect about 500,000 people in the state.

The governor said he is not extending the benefits because it would cost the state hundreds of millions of dollars each week.

“The proper way to extend federal UI benefits is through federal action, not a patchwork of state ones. And it should be noted here that no state is extending this benefit beyond September 4th,” Murphy said.

“The reality is that continuing the $300 per week benefit through state resources would be cost-prohibitive. It would cost, at current, at least $314 million per week and perhaps hundreds of millions of dollars more,” he added.

N.J. will not use pandemic relief funds to expand unemployment benefits, Murphy says

“We recognize the impact that this will have on some families facing unemployment issues. To support New Jerseyans through suffering through the economic impacts of the pandemic we have invested in rent-assistance, food-assistance, child-care assistance, health-care affordability assistance, and other assistance programs we have set up and which are funded through billions of dollars of federal coronavirus relief programs,” he said.

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New Jersey’s unemployment rate is 7.3% and it received $6.2 billion in federal funds from the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan. At its height during the pandemic, the state’s unemployment rate was 16.6% in April 2020, according to federal data.

Three federal programs will end now that Murphy opted not to extend the benefits.

About 250,000 New Jerseyans are currently receiving Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), the Labor Department said last week. The program gives benefits to people who wouldn’t normally qualify for traditional unemployment, including gig workers and the self-employed.

Another 190,000 people receive Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), which adds 13 weeks of benefits for people who exhaust their regular payments. But of those, about 100,000 people will be moved onto a different extended benefit program, the Labor Department said.

Additionally, people will stop receiving the additional $300 per week supplemental payment, which is also set to expire on Sept. 4.

The administration estimates extending PUA would cost about $70 million to $161 million a week, PEUC would cost an estimated $77 million to $124 million and Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation could run between $168 million to nearly $300 million a week.

New Jersey is tied for the fifth-highest unemployment rate in the nation, behind Nevada, New York, New Mexico and California.

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Matt Arco may be reached at [email protected].

Karin Price Mueller may be reached at [email protected].

Sours: https://www.nj.com/coronavirus/2021/08/nj-will-not-extend-pandemic-unemployment-benefits-to-500k-residents-source-says.html
Thousands of unemployed residents still waiting for benefits

New Jersey Unemployment Insurance

The Federal-State Unemployment Insurance Program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who are unemployed through no fault of their own (as determined under New Jersey law, and meet other eligibility requirements of New Jersey law.

  • Unemployment insurance (UI) payments (benefits) are intended to provide temporary financial assistance to unemployed workers who meet the requirements of New Jersey law.
  • New Jersey administers a separate unemployment insurance program within guidelines established by Federal law.

The Federal-State Unemployment Insurance Program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who are unemployed through no fault of their own (as determined under New Jersey law, and meet other eligibility requirements of New Jersey law.

  • Unemployment insurance (UI) payments (benefits) are intended to provide temporary financial assistance to unemployed workers who meet the requirements of New Jersey law.
  • New Jersey administers a separate unemployment insurance program within guidelines established by Federal law.
Sours: https://www.benefits.gov

You will also be interested:

Q. What are the maximum benefits payable on an unemployment claim?

A. A claimant may potentially receive 60 percent of his/her average weekly wage, not to exceed the maximum weekly amount. In 2018 the maximum weekly benefit amount is $681.00. The maximum weekly amount is recalculated annually and is equal to 56 2/3 percent of the statewide average weekly wage. A claimant can collect a maximum of 26 weeks of benefits on a regular unemployment claim.

Q. How is employer liability for unemployment benefits calculated?

A. Each base-year employer is charged a percentage of each benefit payment in proportion to the amount of wages that the employer paid the claimant during the base-year and the total wages received by the claimant during that period.

Q. What is a lag-period employer?

A. A lag-period employer is an employer who paid wages to an individual between the last day of the base-year period and the filing of an unemployment claim. Since wages earned in the lag period are not in the base-year, employers with only lag-period employment are not normally charged. However, if the claim is determined invalid under the regular base year, an Alternative Base Period may be used to determine monetary eligibility. If the lag-period employment is in the Alternative Base Year, the lag-period employer will then be charged.

Q. How should I report a possible fraud situation?

A. You may report information about a wage-benefit conflict of a former worker who has been recalled to work on Form B-187Q, “Unemployment Benefits Charged to Experience Rating Account,” which is mailed to “chargeable” employers quarterly. You may report any other information about a potentially fraudulent situation online here.

Q. Can a claimant work part time and still collect unemployment benefits?

A. Yes, a claimant may be eligible for partial unemployment benefits while working part time due to lack of work. However, the worker’s weekly benefit amount will be reduced dollar-for-dollar for all earnings in excess of 20% of the worker’s full weekly benefit rate.

Q. Can a claimant receive unemployment benefits while attending school or receiving training?

A. A claimant is disqualified for benefits for any week in which the individual is a student in full time (at least 12 credits) attendance at, or on vacation from, any public or other nonprofit educational institution, except in cases in which the claimant establishes 20 or more base weeks of employment or meets the alternative earnings test during academic term(s) in the base-year.

The full-time student criteria do not apply to any individual attending a school or training program approved by the Division to enhance the individual’s employment opportunity.

Q. What is meant by the terms voluntary quit “with good cause” or “without good cause”?

A. A claimant is determined to have voluntarily quit a job with good cause if the reason for leaving is directly attributable to actions of the employer or conditions of employment. The burden of proof is on the claimant to prove that he/she quit for good cause.

Q. Can I be charged for future benefits if an employee quits and is then disqualified for leaving employment without good cause attributable to the work?

A. An individual who quits work may become eligible for future benefits after meeting a re-qualifying requirement. For separations occurring before July 1, 2010, the New Jersey requirement is having at least four weeks of new employment, earning at least six times the weekly benefit rate, and being separated from the new employment for a non-disqualifying reason. For separations occurring July 1, 2010, and later, the New Jersey requirement is having at least eight weeks of new employment, earning at least 10 times the weekly benefit rate and being separated from the new employment for a non-disqualifying reason.

According to federal law, all states’ unemployment compensation laws must contain re-qualifying requirements. Once the re-qualifying threshold is met, the disqualification must end and the individual is potentially eligible to receive benefits.

The New Jersey Unemployment Compensation Law provides for the relief of charges to a contributory employer’s experience rating account when an individual’s separation from employment is for reasons that are disqualifying under the law. Thus, even though an individual may overcome an imposed disqualification or a potential disqualification, and is entitled to receive unemployment benefits, the employer’s account will not be charged for the benefits that occur subsequent to the disqualifying separation. See Chapter II, Section 2, “Relief of Benefit Charges for Disqualifying Separations.”

Q. Will a discharged employee be eligible to collect benefits?

A. If you discharge an employee, we must determine whether the discharge was for misconduct in connection with the employment. The burden of proof is on you. New Jersey Law provides for three different types of misconduct: simple misconduct, severe misconduct, and gross misconduct. See “Disqualification/Eligibility Conditions.”

 

 

Sours: https://nj.gov/labor/handbook/content/QandABenefits.html


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