Sword & shield

Sword & shield DEFAULT

Pokémon™ Sword and Pokémon™ Shield Double Pack

Available now

A new generation of Pokémon is coming to the Nintendo Switch™ system.

If you purchase the Pokémon™ Sword and Pokémon™ Shield Double Pack bundle, then you can receive two codes that will reward you with special items known as Dynamax Crystals! 

As a special bonus for purchasing the Pokémon Sword and Pokémon Shield Double Pack, you’ll receive two codes (one per game) that will each reward you a special item known as a Dynamax Crystal*.

By using the Dynamax Crystals received via these codes, you’ll be able to face Dynamax Larvitar and Dynamax Jangmo-o in special Max Raid Battles**. These Pokémon normally can’t be encountered until later in the game!

Max Raid Battles are battles in which you can recruit up to three players* via local communication or the internet to face down powerful Dynamax Pokémon!

Every participant will get a chance to catch the Pokémon if you triumph in the battle! Additionally, with Dynamax Crystals, you’ll be able to attempt these Max Raid Battles as many times as it takes to win or until midnight on the day that the Dynamax Crystal was used, whichever comes first.*

A new generation of Pokémon is coming to the Nintendo Switch™ system. Begin your adventure as a Pokémon Trainer by choosing one of three new partner Pokémon: Grookey, Scorbunny, or Sobble. Then embark on a journey in the new Galar region, where you’ll challenge the troublemakers of Team Yell, while unraveling the mystery behind the Legendary Pokémon Zacian and Zamazenta! Explore the Wild Area, a vast expanse of land where the player can freely control the camera. Team up with three other players locally or online in the new multiplayer co-op Max Raid Battles* in which players will face off against gigantic and super-strong Pokémon known as Dynamax Pokémon.

Certain Pokémon can even Gigantamax to gain a new look and a powerful set of G-Max moves. But there’s more to being a champion than honing your battle skills: you can pick your own clothes and get a new hairdo while visiting the stores in town, so you can be the trainer you want to be. Throughout your journey, you’ll encounter newly discovered Pokémon as well as familiar ones that will look a little different in their new Galarian forms! For another way to level up your Pokémon, assign them Poké Jobs to complete, and for fun, you can even play with your Pokémon in Pokémon Camp!  

  • Catch, battle, and trade Pokémon on a new adventure in the Galar region
  • Choose from three new partner Pokémon and encounter never-before-seen Pokémon
  • Unravel the mystery behind the Legendary Pokémon Zacian and Zamazenta!
  • Players can control the camera in the vast Wild Area
  • Team up with other Trainers to participate in Max Raid Battles**!
  • Battle wild Dynamax Pokémon in Max Raid Battles** and try catching them!

Release date:
November 15, 2019

Players:
up to 4 players

Genre:
Adventure, Role-Playing

Publisher:
Nintendo

Developer:
GAME FREAK

Supported Languages:
Japanese, French, German, Chinese, English, Spanish, Italian, Korean

Supported Play Modes:
TV mode

TV mode

Tabletop mode

Tabletop mode

Handheld mode

Handheld mode

Software compatibility and play experience may differ on Nintendo Switch Lite. Additional accessories may be required (sold separately). See support for details.

ESRB Rating:

Nintendo Switch Online

Play online, access classic Super NES™ games, and more with a Nintendo Switch Online membership.

*MSRP: Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price. Actual price may vary. See retailer for details.

*Each Dynamax Crystal can only be used in the Wild Area and expires at midnight on the day it is used. Each code can only be used once in either the Pokémon Sword or Pokémon Shield game.  

**Nintendo Switch Online membership (sold separately) and Nintendo Account required for online features. This game includes an in-game option to purchase a Nintendo Switch Online membership for users who do not have one. Not available in all countries. Internet access required for online features. Terms apply. nintendo.com/switch-online

© 2019 Pokémon. © 1995 – 2019 Nintendo / Creatures Inc. / GAME FREAK inc. Pokémon and Nintendo Switch are trademarks of Nintendo. © 2019 Nintendo.

Sours: https://www.nintendo.com/games/detail/pokemon-sword-and-pokemon-shield-double-pack-switch/

Sword & Shield

Collection Status

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#1 - Celebi V

#2 - Roselia

#3 - Roselia

#4 - Roserade

#5 - Cottonee

#6 - Whimsicott

#7 - Maractus

#8 - Durant

#9 - Dhelmise V

#10 - Grookey

#11 - Grookey

#12 - Thwackey

#13 - Thwackey

#14 - Rillaboom

#15 - Rillaboom

#16 - Blipbug

#17 - Blipbug

#18 - Dottler

#19 - Orbeetle

#20 - Gossifleur

#21 - Eldegoss

#22 - Vulpix

#23 - Ninetales

#24 - Torkoal V

#25 - Victini V

#26 - Heatmor

#27 - Salandit

#28 - Salazzle

#29 - Turtonator

#30 - Scorbunny

#31 - Scorbunny

#32 - Raboot

#33 - Raboot

#34 - Cinderace

#35 - Cinderace

#36 - Cinderace

#37 - Sizzlipede

#38 - Sizzlipede

#39 - Centiskorch

#40 - Shellder

#41 - Cloyster

#42 - Krabby

#43 - Krabby

#44 - Kingler

#45 - Goldeen

#46 - Goldeen

#47 - Seaking

#48 - Lapras

#49 - Lapras V

#50 - Lapras VMAX

#51 - Qwilfish

#52 - Mantine

#53 - Keldeo V

#54 - Sobble

#55 - Sobble

#56 - Drizzile

#57 - Drizzile

#58 - Inteleon

#59 - Inteleon

#60 - Chewtle

#61 - Drednaw

#62 - Cramorant

#63 - Snom

#64 - Frosmoth

#65 - Pikachu

#66 - Raichu

#67 - Chinchou

#68 - Chinchou

#69 - Lanturn

#70 - Joltik

#71 - Galvantula

#72 - Tapu Koko V

#73 - Yamper

#74 - Yamper

#75 - Boltund

#76 - Boltund

#77 - Pincurchin

#78 - Morpeko

#79 - Morpeko V

#80 - Morpeko VMAX

#81 - Galarian Ponyta

#82 - Galarian Rapidash

#83 - Gastly

#84 - Haunter

#85 - Gengar

#86 - Wobbuffet V

#87 - Munna

#88 - Musharna

#89 - Sinistea

#90 - Polteageist

#91 - Indeedee V

#92 - Diglett

#93 - Dugtrio

#94 - Hitmonlee

#95 - Hitmonchan

#96 - Rhyhorn

#97 - Rhyhorn

#98 - Rhydon

#99 - Rhyperior

#100 - Sudowoodo

#101 - Baltoy

#102 - Baltoy

#103 - Claydol

#104 - Regirock V

#105 - Mudbray

#106 - Mudsdale

#107 - Silicobra

#108 - Silicobra

#109 - Sandaconda

#110 - Sandaconda

#111 - Clobbopus

#112 - Clobbopus

#113 - Grapploct

#114 - Stonjourner

#115 - Stonjourner V

#116 - Stonjourner VMAX

#117 - Galarian Zigzagoon

#118 - Galarian Linoone

#119 - Galarian Obstagoon

#120 - Sableye V

#121 - Skorupi

#122 - Drapion

#123 - Croagunk

#124 - Toxicroak

#125 - Nickit

#126 - Thievul

#127 - Galarian Meowth

#128 - Galarian Perrserker

#129 - Mawile

#130 - Ferroseed

#131 - Ferrothorn

#132 - Galarian Stunfisk

#133 - Pawniard

#134 - Bisharp

#135 - Corviknight

#136 - Cufant

#137 - Copperajah

#138 - Zacian V

#139 - Zamazenta V

#140 - Snorlax

#141 - Snorlax V

#142 - Snorlax VMAX

#143 - Hoothoot

#144 - Noctowl

#145 - Minccino

#146 - Minccino

#147 - Cinccino

#148 - Oranguru

#149 - Drampa

#150 - Rookidee

#151 - Corvisquire

#152 - Wooloo

#153 - Wooloo

#154 - Dubwool

#155 - Cramorant V

#156 - Air Balloon

#157 - Bede

#158 - Big Charm

#159 - Crushing Hammer

#160 - Energy Retrieval

#161 - Energy Search

#162 - Energy Switch

#163 - Evolution Incense

#164 - Great Ball

#165 - Hop

#166 - Hyper Potion

#167 - Lucky Egg

#168 - Lum Berry

#169 - Marnie

#170 - Metal Saucer

#171 - Ordinary Rod

#172 - Pal Pad

#173 - Poké Kid

#174 - Pokégear 3.0

#175 - Pokémon Catcher

#176 - Pokémon Center Lady

#177 - Potion

#178 - Professor's Research

#179 - Quick Ball

#180 - Rare Candy

#181 - Rotom Bike

#182 - Sitrus Berry

#183 - Switch

#184 - Team Yell Grunt

#185 - Vitality Band

#186 - Aurora Energy

#187 - Dhelmise

#188 - Torkoal

#189 - Lapras

#190 - Morpeko

#191 - Wobbuffet

#192 - Indeedee

#193 - Stonjourner

#194 - Sableye

#195 - Zacian

#196 - Zamazenta

#197 - Snorlax

#198 - Cramorant

#199 - Bede

#200 - Marnie

#201 - Professor's Research

#202 - Team Yell Grunt

#203 - Lapras VMAX

#204 - Morpeko VMAX

#205 - Stonjourner VMAX

#206 - Snorlax VMAX

#207 - Bede

#208 - Marnie

#209 - Professor's Research

#210 - Team Yell Grunt

#211 - Zacian V

#212 - Zamazenta V

#213 - Air Balloon

#214 - Metal Saucer

#215 - Ordinary Rod

#216 - Quick Ball

Sours: http://www.pokellector.com/sets/SH01-Sword-Shield
  1. Garmin gps nuvi 42lm
  2. Black senior citizens pictures
  3. Opi gel shine instructions
  4. American kennel club collar

Pokémon™ Shield

Available now

Get ready for the next Pokémon adventure in the Pokémon™ Sword and Pokémon™ Shield games.

A new generation of Pokémon is coming to the Nintendo Switch™ system. Begin your adventure as a Pokémon Trainer by choosing one of three new partner Pokémon: Grookey, Scorbunny, or Sobble. Then embark on a journey in the new Galar region, where you’ll challenge the troublemakers of Team Yell, while unraveling the mystery behind the Legendary Pokémon Zacian and Zamazenta! Explore the Wild Area, a vast expanse of land where the player can freely control the camera. Team up with three other players locally or online in the new multiplayer co-op Max Raid Battles* in which players will face off against gigantic and super-strong Pokémon known as Dynamax Pokémon.

Certain Pokémon can even Gigantamax to gain a new look and a powerful set of G-Max moves. But there’s more to being a champion than honing your battle skills: you can pick your own clothes and get a new hairdo while visiting the stores in town, so you can be the trainer you want to be. Throughout your journey, you’ll encounter newly discovered Pokémon as well as familiar ones that will look a little different in their new Galarian forms! For another way to level up your Pokémon, assign them Poké Jobs to complete, and for fun, you can even play with your Pokémon in Pokémon Camp!

Release date:
November 15, 2019

Players:
up to 4 players

Genre:
Adventure, Role-Playing

Publisher:
Nintendo

Developer:
GAME FREAK

Game file size:
12.4 GB

Supported Languages:
Japanese, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Korean, Chinese, English

Supported Play Modes:
TV mode

TV mode

Tabletop mode

Tabletop mode

Handheld mode

Handheld mode

Software compatibility and play experience may differ on Nintendo Switch Lite. Additional accessories may be required (sold separately). See support for details.

ESRB Rating:

Nintendo Switch Online

Play online, access classic Super NES™ games, and more with a Nintendo Switch Online membership.

DLC packs

*MSRP: Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price. Actual price may vary. See retailer for details.

**Nintendo Switch Online membership (sold separately) and Nintendo Account required for online play. This game does not support Save Data Cloud backup. Not available in all countries. Internet access required for online features. Terms apply. nintendo.com/switch-online

*Additional games, systems and a Nintendo Switch Online membership required; sold separately. Nintendo Switch Online membership and Nintendo Account required for online play. Not available in all countries. Internet access required for online features. Terms apply. nintendo.com/switch-online
© 2019 Pokémon. © 1995 – 2019 Nintendo / Creatures Inc. / GAME FREAK inc. Pokémon and Nintendo Switch are trademarks of Nintendo. © 2019 Nintendo.

Sours: https://www.nintendo.com/games/detail/pokemon-shield-switch/

Pokémon Sword and Shield

2019 video games

2019 video game

Pokémon Sword[a] and Pokémon Shield[b] are 2019 role-playing video games developed by Game Freak and published by The Pokémon Company and Nintendo for the Nintendo Switch. They are the first installments in the eighth generation of the Pokémon video game series and the second in the series, following Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!, released on a home game console. Originally teased at E3 2017 and announced in February 2019, Pokémon Sword and Shield were released in November 2019. The games received two downloadable contentexpansion packs through an expansion pass with The Isle of Armor, released in June 2020 and The Crown Tundra, released in October 2020. A physical bundle including both expansion packs with the base games was released in November 2020.

Sword and Shield's concept planning began immediately following the completion of Pokémon Sun and Moon in 2016, while full production began a year later in September 2017. Like previous installments, they chronicle the journey of a young Pokémon trainer aiming to become the Pokémon Champion, this time in the new Galar region, which is based on the United Kingdom. The main objective of the games is to dethrone the Pokémon League Champion, Leon, in a tournament that various other Gym Leaders and rivals also take part in, whilst dealing with Team Yell and a nefarious conspiracy within the League. Sword and Shield introduce 81 new Pokémon alongside 13 regional forms of pre-existing Pokémon; Dynamaxing, which increases the size of Pokémon under certain conditions; Gigantamaxing, which additionally changes the form of certain Pokémon; and the Wild Area, which is a large, open-world area with free camera movement that contains co-op raid battles. The two games also reintroduce features previously seen in Sun and Moon and Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!, such as regional forms and roaming Pokémon depicted in the overworld.

When the decision to not include all pre-existing Pokémon in Sword and Shield was announced, it was met with backlash from a segment of the fan community, resulting in a controversy known as "Dexit" and calls for a boycott months ahead of their release. Despite this, Sword and Shield received generally positive reviews from critics. Particular praise was aimed at the creature design, new features, and the emphasis on simplicity, player freedom, and streamlined encounters, although some criticized the game's smaller Pokédex and a perceived lack of polish or depth. By March 2021, Sword and Shield had sold more than 21 million copies worldwide, becoming one of the fastest-selling games on the Nintendo Switch, and are currently the fifth-best-selling games on the Switch.

Gameplay[edit]

See also: Gameplay of Pokémon

An online multi battle between four players in teams of two

Pokémon Sword and Shield are role-playing video games with adventure elements[1] and in most cases are presented in a fixed camera, third-person perspective; in certain instances free camera movement is available.[1] The player controls a young trainer who goes on a quest to catch and train creatures known as Pokémon and win battles against other trainers. By defeating opposing Pokémon in turn-based battles, the player's Pokémon gains experience, allowing them to level up and increase their battle statistics, learn new battle techniques and in some cases, evolve into more powerful Pokémon. Players can capture wild Pokémon, found during wild encounters, by weakening them in battle and catching them with Poké Balls, allowing them to be added to their party. Players are also able to battle and trade Pokémon with other human players using the Nintendo Switch connectivity features. As with previous games in the series, certain Pokémon are only obtainable in either Sword or Shield, with players encouraged to trade with others in order to obtain all Pokémon from both versions.[1]

Sword and Shield takes place in the Galar region, which is based on the United Kingdom. As with all regions, Galar consists of a number of cities and towns connected by "Routes"; however, there is also an open world area in the center of the region known as the "Wild Area", a concept new to the series. Random encounters with wild Pokémon may take place in tall grass or in bodies of water along routes or in the Wild Area. Wild Pokémon may also be encountered outside of tall grass and elsewhere in the environment and may chase or run away from the player depending on their disposition. The player occasionally battles Trainers in cities, towns, along routes and in the Wild Area. The driving force bringing the player to travel around the Galar region is to take part in the "Gym Challenge", an open-tournament to decide the greatest Pokémon Trainer in the region, dubbed the Champion. Eight of the game's cities and towns are homes to stadiums housing "Gym Leaders", powerful Trainers specializing in certain types of Pokémon; beating a Gym Leader gives the player a "Badge".[1] After attaining eight Badges the player will be able to take part in the "Champion Cup", where they will face off in a single-elimination tournament against the previously faced Gym Leaders and other Trainers remaining in the Gym Challenge. After emerging victorious the player will face the Champion of the Galar region.[1]

New features[edit]

See also: List of generation VIII Pokémon

The player and three NPCswork together to take down a Dynamaxed Pokémon

The games introduce several new features to the series. These include cooperative raid encounters, the Wild Area, and "Dynamaxing" and "Gigantamaxing", both of which temporarily allow Pokémon to grow to larger sizes. The Wild Area is a fully explorable open world area with free camera movement and dynamic weather, which has implications on which Pokémon species appear at a given time.[2][3][4] Gigantamaxing is limited to select Pokémon and feature different forms from the Pokémon's normal appearance.[5] A new mechanic called "Poké Jobs" tasks the player's Pokémon with completing requests, such as assisting in construction or cooking, to gain experience or rare items.[6]Pokémon Gyms make a return after being absent in Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon.[7] As is typical with the series, the two games have version-exclusive content such as certain Pokémon and, for the second time, Gym Leaders.[5] A new 'Camp' mode allows the player to interact and play with their Pokémon and cook different types of curry to provide them with bonuses. New customization options for the player character have been added, like outerwear and other accessories.[8] In most instances, the Pokémon box can now be accessed outside of Pokémon Centers.[9]

Connectivity[edit]

An online Pokémon trade between two players (Feebas on the bottom and Meltan on the top)

Internet connectivity to other players is supported for functionality such as trades, battles, and encountering other trainers in the Wild Area; these functions however require a paid subscription to Nintendo Switch Online.[10]Sword and Shield only support direct game-to-game connectivity between themselves. The games are also compatible with Pokémon Home, an online cloud storage service for storing Pokémon, released in February 2020.[11] Supported Pokémon can be transferred to the games from the Nintendo 3DS app Pokémon Bank, Pokémon Go and Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee! via Pokémon Home.[12][11]Home is the only path to bringing Pokémon from previous games into Sword and Shield.

Plot[edit]

Setting[edit]

Sword and Shield are set in the fictional Galar region (as viewed from the south)

Satellite image of Great Britain (taken from North above to South below), which heavily inspired the design of the Galar region

Sword and Shield take place in the Galar region, a large, narrow expanse of land and one of many regions in the Pokémon world. Game director Shigeru Ohmori described it as a more modern setting.[13] The region itself is inspired by Great Britain,[14] with its many landmarks resembling places such as the Houses of Parliament and the Cerne Abbas Giant.[15][16][17] Within the Galar region lie countryside towns featuring cottages and Victorian architecture to the south.[16] An Industrial Revolution-like city with steampunk-style elements populates the center of the region.[18] Many of the region's towns and cities feature Pokémon Gyms stylized like football stadiums, which show off both Dynamaxing and Gigantamaxing, implemented by the Galar Pokémon League Chairman, Rose.[19] Snow-covered mountains dominate much of the northern areas of the region.[13] Encompassing a large portion of the south-central part of the region is the Wild Area, an open world area with numerous roaming Pokémon species. Weather across the Wild Area changes regularly.[2] Like with Pokémon Sun and Moon, Pokémon previously introduced in older games, such as Weezing, gain regional Galarian Forms with new typings, stats and appearances. Some Pokémon, such as Linoone and Meowth, even gain regional evolutions, a first in the series.[20]

Story[edit]

See also: List of Pokémon characters and List of Pokémon

Similar to many previous entries in the Pokémon franchise, players embark on a journey across the region to become the strongest trainer, fighting eight powerful trainers called Gym Leaders and eventually the region's Champion. The player and their best friend, Hop, receive one of three starter Pokémon: Grookey, Scorbunny, or Sobble from Leon, Champion of the Galar region and Hop's older brother. Afterward, the two explore a forest called the Slumbering Weald but are driven off by a powerful Pokémon. During their subsequent visit to the region's Pokémon Professor, Magnolia and her granddaughter Sonia, they convince Leon to endorse them to take part in the Gym Challenge. After traveling to the next city to register for the Gym Challenge, they encounter rivals Bede and Marnie along with Team Yell, a devout group of hooligans who act as Marnie's unintentional fanbase and are determined to stop anyone else from completing the Challenge. The player also meets Chairman Rose, who, in addition to endorsing Bede as a Gym Challenger, presides over the Galar Pokémon League and the region's main energy company, Macro Cosmos.

The Galar region was heavily inspired by the United Kingdom, with the main city—Wyndon—being a representation of London(pictured). The in-game city has the Rose of the Rondelands, a building inspired by the Houses of Parliament. The iconic red telephone booths appear in the games. The stadium that hosts the player's battle against Leon is modeled after Wembley Stadium.

As their quest continues, the player assists Sonia in her research on two Legendary Pokémon who saved Galar from an ancient crisis called the Darkest Day and deduces that they are the same Pokémon previously encountered in the Slumbering Weald. After beating the eight Gym Leaders, including Piers, Marnie's older brother and the leader of Team Yell, the player makes their way to Wyndon where they win the Champion's Cup, earning an opportunity to battle Leon. The next day, before the battle between the player and Leon can commence, Chairman Rose awakens the legendary Pokémon Eternatus in an attempt to harness its power to provide unlimited energy to Galar, purposefully triggering a second Darkest Day. The player and Hop return to the Slumbering Weald and secure the aid of the legendary Pokémon, Zacian and Zamazenta, to defeat Chairman Rose and Eternatus, after which the player catches Eternatus. Three days later, the player faces and defeats Leon in a battle and becomes the new Champion of the Galar region.

After defeating Leon, the player and Hop return to the Slumbering Weald to return Zacian and Zamazenta's artifacts to their rightful place. The two also meet Sonia, who has become the Galar region's new Pokémon Professor. However, they are confronted by Sordward and Shielbert, two brothers claiming to be descendants of ancient Galarian kings. The two steal one of the relics and begin forcing innocent Pokémon to Dynamax. The player, Hop, and Piers work with the Gym Leaders to subdue the Dynamax Pokémon and then track down and confront the brothers. Once both the player and Hop corners the brothers in the Hammerlocke Power Plant, they then explain why they forced many innocent Pokemon to Dynamax. They forced innocent Pokemon to Dynamax as experiments on what would happen if Zacian/Zamazenta was to be sprinkled with Galar particles. The brothers' ultimate goal is to reveal the true barbaric and brutish nature of Zacian or Zamazenta, because Sonia thought that the two heroes who stopped the Darkest Day were Pokemon rather than humans. They use Dynamax energy to drive Zamazenta (in Sword) or Zacian (in Shield) berserk, and the player drives them off with the help of Zacian (in Sword) or Zamazenta (in Shield). They then are challenged to a battle by the Legendary Pokémon and allowed to catch it, while Hop follows Zamazenta/Zacian back to the Slumbering Weald and calms it down, being chosen by it as its Trainer. The player and Hop have a final battle, after which Hop decides to be a Pokémon Professor and becomes Sonia's assistant.

Development[edit]

See also: List of generation VIII Pokémon § Design and development

Development of Pokémon Sword and Shield began immediately following the completion of Sun and Moon in the months preceding their release in November 2016. Shigeru Ohmori, who previously directed Sun and Moon, formed a team who begun thinking about ideas for the title. Kazumasa Iwao, director of Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon later joined the project as planning director and full production started in September 2017. One of the first ideas the team had was making Pokémon giant as the game could be played on a large screen, thanks to the Switch's ability to connect to a television. Ohmori then thought about having a sword and a shield Pokémon to defeat the giant Pokémon; that's how the games' titles were decided.[21][22]

Approximately 1,000 people from multiple companies were involved in the development, marketing, and public relations associated with Sword and Shield. Approximately 200 Game Freak employees worked directly on the games while around 100 Creatures Inc. employees worked on 3D modeling, with an additional 100 involved in debugging and game testing. Junichi Masuda estimated the total number of people involved to be 50% greater than previous Pokémon titles.

The idea of strength and striving to be the greatest and strongest was one of the core themes that Game Freak used in designing the games. This is expressed through the Nintendo Switch's status as the most powerful console to run a Pokémon game, with features such as Dynamaxing, and references to British folklore.[22] The games' soundtrack is inspired by British rock music.[22] One track was composed by Toby Fox, best known for being the creator of Undertale.[23] The Switch's ability to render larger Pokémon models and better show size differences between species is the root of the Dynamax feature. The idea of "growing and evolving" is a core concept of the games—for both the trainer and their Pokémon—stemming from producer Junichi Masuda and director Shigeru Ohmori's experience with the franchise.[24]

Producer Junichi Masudasaid the decision to cut some Pokémon from the games was a difficult choice

Unlike other core Pokémon games, not all existing Pokémon species appear or are usable in Sword and Shield. Masuda addressed this as a potential issue in a 2018 interview with GameSpot, at which point he said that "it does get complicated when you talk about the details and we're still figuring it out, but we do have plans to find ways to let players use their Pokémon in the next game."[25] By 2019, Masuda explained that the sheer number of species, combined with the need to produce assets relating to new features such as the Dynamaxing system, preserve game balance, and maintain a degree of quality made it infeasible to include all existing Pokémon without extensively lengthening development time. As such, only Pokémon that appear within the Galar region are transferable from previous titles via Pokémon Home.[12][26] Furthermore, according to the developers, the higher fidelity models, which were designed to be more "expressive," had to be built from the ground up as simply transferring existing ones produced for the 3DS platform was not possible.[27][28] Masuda confirmed that all three companies involved in the development, Nintendo, Game Freak, and The Pokémon Company, agreed to cut down the games' Pokédex.[29]

Release[edit]

The games were originally teased through a special message by The Pokémon Company president Tsunekazu Ishihara during Nintendo's E3 2017presentation, where Ishihara mentioned that Game Freak was working on a new core series Pokémon role-playing game for Nintendo Switch but that it would not be released for more than a year.[30] During a press conference held by The Pokémon Company in Japan on May 30, 2018, Junichi Masuda confirmed that the next Pokémon core series games would release on Switch in the second half of 2019.[31] Ishihara also assured that the then-upcoming titles would not have influences from Pokémon Go like Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee! had and that it would introduce many new Pokémon and "polished" graphics.[32]

Sword and Shield were fully unveiled in a special Nintendo Direct presentation on February 27, 2019, introducing the games' region and starter Pokémon. The presentation coincided with Pokémon Day, a fan celebration of Pokémon on the anniversary of the Japanese release of Pokémon Red and Green.[33] A second Nintendo Direct about the games was held on June 5, 2019, which revealed some of its new features, characters, and Pokémon, including the legendary Pokémon Zacian and Zamazenta, which appear on the box art. The release date of November 15, 2019, was also announced as part of this presentation.[3] Game Freak intentionally limited the number of new Pokémon revealed through promotional material to encourage players to discover them in-game.[34]

A promotional crossover between Sword and Shield and Tetris 99 occurred from November 8–11, during which a limited-time unlockable theme based on the games was available.[35] A web app was also released, allowing the viewer to explore the Wild Area online.[36] In Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, an online tournament themed around Pokémon was held from November 15–18 to promote Sword and Shield's release, while a spirit event occurred from November 22–27, with some Pokémon being available as collectible spirits.[37][38]

Expansion packs[edit]

Main articles: Pokémon Sword and Shield: The Isle of Armor and Pokémon Sword and Shield: The Crown Tundra

During the Pokémon Direct on January 9, 2020, a pair of expansion packs were announced which were released throughout 2020 as part of an expansion pass. The first pack, The Isle of Armor, was released on June 17, 2020, while the second pack, The Crown Tundra, was released on October 22, 2020. A physical bundle including both expansion packs with the base games was released on November 6, 2020.[39] The expansion packs introduce new Legendary Pokémon such as Kubfu and its evolved forms in The Isle of Armor and Calyrex in The Crown Tundra, along with new regional forms for pre-existing Pokémon such as Slowpoke.[40] Between both expansion packs, they add more than 200 pre-existing Pokémon that aren't available in the base game.[41] The explorable area introduced in The Isle of Armor draws inspiration from the Isle of Man while the area in The Crown Tundra is based on Scotland.[42]

Reception[edit]

Pre-release[edit]

The decision not to include all pre-existing Pokémon in the games drew criticism from many fans, who referred to it as "Dexit", a portmanteau of Pokédex and Brexit (tying in with the Galar region's British theme),[43] and used the hashtag "#BringBackNationalDex" to discuss the matter on social media.[44] Fan backlash focused on the removal of a long-standing aspect of the franchise, the discarding of its former English tagline "gotta catch 'em all," and a perceived lack of improvements in other areas of the games, such as graphics and animations.[44][45] Some fans called for the games to be delayed until all of the Pokémon could be added.[46][47] In an interview with Famitsu, Shigeru Ohmori stated that models for Pokémon appearing in Sword and Shield were being made again from the ground up.[48][49]

Writing for Polygon, Patricia Hernandez commented that "to some degree, the backlash makes sense" while adding that it had "gotten out of hand".[44] Alex Donaldson of VG247 noted that feature creep—where an increase in new features over time may lead to removal of previous ones—had finally reached Pokémon, and long-overlooked design shortcomings of Game Freak were brought to the forefront as a result.[50]Kotaku's Gita Jackson summarized the backlash as "the tension of a desire to indulge in nostalgia against a desire to experience more complexity."[51] Joe Merrick, the webmaster of fansite Serebii, considered the controversy to have caused the most unrest among Pokémon fans since the troubled launch of Pokémon Bank in 2013.[43]

Masuda formally responded to the criticism on June 28, 2019, two weeks after it erupted, expressing appreciation for the love and passion shown by fans.[52] He reiterated that the removal of certain Pokémon was a difficult decision to make and that they would be available in different games in the future. Michael McWhertor of Polygon noted that while Masuda's statement acknowledged the fans' discontent, it "[did not] amount to much".[53]

Critical response[edit]

Reception

Upon release, Pokémon Sword and Pokémon Shield received "generally favorable reviews" according to review aggregatorMetacritic.[54][55] Critics praised the games' simplicity, new elements such as Dynamaxing, and streamlined battle encounters but criticized the incomplete Pokédex and not taking full advantage of the games' potential.

Brian Shea from Game Informer particularly praised the new Dynamax feature for being visually and strategically exciting without being overused: "while the Dynamax mechanic has the potential to disrupt the flow of any battle, it doesn't factor into most encounters, since it can only be used in Gym battles and select other situations".[59] Casey DeFreitas for IGN also praised Sword and Shield for their fun gameplay and lack of monotonous activities, while criticizing aspects such as cutscenes and lack of a full Pokédex.[62] Writing for GameSpot, Kallie Plagge also praised the pair for easy-to-understand game systems and a sense of freedom stating, "you're not held back by overly complicated back-end systems or hoops to jump through; from the outset, you can start wandering the Galar region, seeing its new Pokémon, and trying out its new battle strategies with very little in your way."

Conversely, Chris Tapsell for Eurogamer criticized the games, commenting that it lacked substance and did not live up to previous titles in the series. Tapsell commented "this is a new generation of Pokémon games that promises much, with brilliant new Pokémon, a raft of intricate system-tinkering for long-term fans and a series-first stab at an 'open-world' area. But all that's new seems to have come at a cost – and the cost is almost everything else in the game."[65] James Grebey and Tom Philip of GQ also felt somewhat underwhelmed, praising the Wild Area but stating that the games were "satisfying but pedestrian" and feel like "proof of concept [with] another stage of evolution left for console Pokémon games". They also said that "there is... a lot in Sword and Shield that doesn't feel like it couldn't have been achieved on the Nintendo 3DS."[66]

Sales[edit]

In Japan, Sword and Shield sold two million copies during their first three days on sale, surpassing Super Smash Bros. Ultimate as the fastest-selling Switch games in that region.[67][68] In the US, they sold more than two million copies in their opening weekend. By November 21, 2019, Sword and Shield had sold more than six million copies worldwide, surpassing Super Smash Bros. Ultimate as the fastest-selling Switch games.[69] By March 2021, the games had sold 21.10 million copies worldwide.[70]

Awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon_Sword_and_Shield

Shield sword &

Pokémon Sword and Shield

Sword and Shield redirects here. For the TCG expansion, see Sword & Shield (TCG). For the Pokémon Adventures chapter, see Sword & Shield chapter (Adventures).
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Release dates
Japan: November 15, 2019
North America: November 15, 2019
Australia: November 15, 2019
Europe: November 15, 2019
South Korea: November 15, 2019
Hong Kong: November 15, 2019
Taiwan: November 15, 2019
Japanese boxart
Sword JP boxart.png
Pokémon Sword Japanese boxart
Shield JP boxart.png
Pokémon Shield Japanese boxart
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Pokémon Sword (Japanese: ポケットモンスター ソードPocket Monsters Sword) and Pokémon Shield (Japanese: ポケットモンスター シールドPocket Monsters Shield) are the primary paired versions of Generation VIII. The games were released on the Nintendo Switch worldwide on November 15, 2019 for both retail sale and download. All copies of the game are playable in nine languages: Japanese, English, German, Spanish, French, Italian, Korean, Simplified and Traditional Chinese.

During E3 2017, Tsunekazu Ishihara announced that the next core series titles would be available on the Nintendo Switch, but they were not prepared to release any more information at the time. On May 30, 2018, The Pokémon Company gave a press conference and announced that the new core games would have more traditional gameplay, as opposed to that found in Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!.

The games were formally announced on Pokémon Day, February 27, 2019 at 11 pm JST during a worldwide announcement through Nintendo Direct hosted by Tsunekazu Ishihara, Junichi Masuda, and Shigeru Ohmori. An official trailer was shown, giving information on the region and the starter Pokémon players can choose from.

The Pokémon Sword and Shield Expansion Pass was revealed during a Pokémon Direct on January 9, 2020; it adds two new areas to the game, The Isle of Armor and The Crown Tundra.

Plot

The player is a young child who lives with their mother in the town of Postwick in the Galarregion. One day, the player's friend Hop invites them to meet his big brother Leon, the Champion of the Galar League, so that they both can receive a starter Pokémon from him. After receiving their starters, the player and Hop follow a runaway Wooloo into the Slumbering Weald. Inside the foggy forest, they encounter a mysterious Pokémon that is completely unaffected by moves. They are soon rescued by Leon, and then they set out to receive an endorsement from him so that they can participate in Galar's Gym Challenge. After some convincing by Professor Magnolia, Leon agrees to give both the player and Hop an endorsement. Just then, two Wishing Stars fall out of the sky, and Professor Magnolia converts them into Dynamax Bands for the player and Hop, allowing them to Dynamax their Pokémon. The player and Hop then travel together to Motostoke to attend the Gym Challenge's opening ceremony, where they meet Rose, the president of Macro Cosmos and the chairman of the Galar Pokémon League, as well as a band of hooligans known as Team Yell.

After the opening ceremony, the player sets out to collect the eight Badges required to compete in the Champion Cup tournament from Gym Leaders across the region. Along the way, Professor Magnolia's granddaughter and assistantSonia tells them about Galar's history and a mysterious event known as the Darkest Day. The player ends up uncovering pieces of the Darkest Day's history during their journey, much to Sonia's pleasure. Eventually, the player manages to successfully collect the eight Badges and travels to Wyndon, where the Champion Cup is held. They win their way through the Champion Cup semifinals, where they defeat Hop and end his dream of surpassing his brother. After confronting Macro Cosmos's vice-president Oleana at Rose Tower, the player participates in the Champion Cup finals and wins their way through it, earning themselves the right to challenge Leon.

However, just before the player and Leon's battle can begin, Rose makes a public announcement, revealing that he's going to bring about the second Darkest Day to save Galar from an energy crisis a thousand years in the future. To stop Rose's plans, the player and Hop travel to the Slumbering Weald again to seek help from the Legendary PokémonZacian and Zamazenta, one of whom had been the mysterious Pokémon they saw at the start of their journey. They find and take along a Rusted Sword and a Rusted Shield from the heart of the forest and go to confront Rose in Hammerlocke, where it is revealed that the Darkest Day is the result of Rose awakening a Legendary Pokémon known as Eternatus. After defeating Rose, the player and Hop go to face Eternatus at the top of the Hammerlocke Stadium, where Leon unsuccessfully tries to catch it, forcing the player to battle it. Once Eternatus seems to have been defeated, however, it suddenly transforms into its even more powerful Eternamax form. However, thanks to the sword and the shield they found, the player and Hop are able to summon Zacian and Zamazenta to their aid, and together, they defeat Eternatus in a Max Raid Battle, allowing the player to catch it and thus end the crisis. Three days later, the player finally takes on Leon in a battle at Wyndon Stadium and defeats him, ending his career as the undefeated Champion and making the player the new Champion of Galar.

During the post-game, the player and Hop travel to the heart of Slumbering Weald to return the Rusted Sword and the Rusted Shield, only to be confronted by the rich brothers Sordward and Shielbert, who try to steal the artifacts. Although the player manages to defeat one of the brothers and recover one of the stolen items, the two still manage to get away with the other one. The player and Hop are then forced to travel around Galar to stop the Dynamax Pokémon the brothers have let loose at the Gym Stadiums. They finally confront them again at Hammerlocke Stadium, where they reveal their plan being to reinstate the Galarian monarchy and denigrate Zacian and Zamazenta. Using the artifact they stole, the brothers lure in one of the Legendary Pokémon and drive it berserk, forcing the player to battle it. After it has been defeated, the other Legendary Pokémon appears as well, which the player battles and catches. During the battle, Hop follows the first Legendary to the heart of Slumbering Weald, where he successfully calms it down. Deeming Hop worthy of its trust, the Legendary Pokémon then willingly joins his party. The player and Hop then battle for one last time, after which Hop declares that his new dream is to become a Pokémon Professor, and Sordward and Shielbert briefly reappear to apologise for their actions.

The Isle of Armor

Main article: The Isle of Armor

The player travels to the Isle of Armor off the coast of Galar and becomes an apprentice in the local Master Dojo, a battle facility run by former Champion Mustard. They also develop a new rivalry with a Gym Leader-in-training and fellow apprentice named KlaraSw/AverySh.

The Crown Tundra

Main article: The Crown Tundra

The player travels to the Crown Tundra in southern Galar, where they meet Peony, an enthusiastic former Steel-type Gym Leader, and take his daughter Peonia's place in his explorations of solving the legends lurking around the Tundra.

Blurb

A wild new adventure with Pokémon!

You can battle to be the best!

Carve a path to the future!Sw / Protect the world from disaster!Sh

Band together in new co-op battles!

Features

The games mix some of the changes introduced in Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee! with the more traditional gameplay last seen in Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon. Wild Pokémon now appear on the overworld, known as "symbol encounters", similar to the Let's Go games, as well as random encounters shaking in tall grass.

Known as the Gym Challenge, Gyms that the player must battle with the goal of becoming the Champion return to the games, after being replaced by trials in Pokémon Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun, and Ultra Moon. The challenge culminates in the annual Champion Cup tournament where the player may challenge the Champion.

Wild Area

Main article: Wild Area

The Wild Area is a vast, open area that connects several towns in the Galar region. It is home to a wide variety of wildPokémon.

Dynamax and Gigantamax

Main article: Dynamaxand Gigantamax

Dynamax is a new type of transformation that allows any Pokémon from the Galar region to power up and become larger using the Dynamax Band. After Dynamaxing, a Pokémon can use a Max Move.

Gigantamax is a special phenomenon that also changes the appearance of a few individuals of certain species of Pokémon. Like Dynamaxing, the Pokémon is increased in power and becomes bigger. A Gigantamax Pokémon can use a G-Max Move.

Max Raid Battles

Main article: Max Raid Battle

Max Raid Battles are a new cooperative feature that allows up to four players to challenge a Dynamax Pokémon together over local wireless or Nintendo Switch Online.

Rotom Phone

Main article: Rotom Phone

Replacing the Rotom Pokédex of the Generation VII games, the Rotom Phone acts not only as a Pokédex but also has additional features, such as the Town Map. It also acts as the main interface for the game's menu.

Y-Comm

Main article: Y-Comm

The Y-Comm serves as an interface to connect with other players over local wireless or on the internet through Nintendo Switch Online. Players can trade (either a Link Trade or Surprise Trade), battle, swap League Cards, and join Max Raid Battles.

Battle Stadium

Main article: Battle Stadium

Replacing the Battle Spot from the Generation VI and VII games, the Battle Stadium allows players to participate in battles over the internet through Nintendo Switch Online. Players can participate in Ranked Battles, Casual Battles, and Official Competitions as well as host or join Friendly Competitions.

Rotomi

Main article: Rotomi

Rotomi replaces the PCs in previous games and has several features including allowing players to send their Pokémon on Poké Jobs, design their League Card, and draw for the Loto-ID.

Pokémon Camp

Main article: Pokémon Camp

Pokémon Camp allows players can go camping and interact with their Pokémon, cook curry, and visit other player's camps.

Gym Challenge

Trainers must receive an endorsement in order to participate in the Gym Challenge. Those who defeat the eight Gym Leaders and collect the eight Badges can participate in the annual Champion Cup for a chance to challenge the current Champion of Galar. The Gym Leaders are Milo (Grass), Nessa (Water), Kabu (Fire), Bea (Fighting)Sw/Allister (Ghost)Sh, Opal (Fairy), Gordie (Rock)Sw/Melony (Ice)Sh, Piers (Dark), and Raihan (Dragon).

During the game, Opal and Piers retire from their positions as Gym Leaders and are succeeded by Bede and Marnie, respectively. During The Crown Tundra, Klara (Poison)Sw/Avery (Psychic)Sh is revealed to have become minor division Gym Leader.

Champion Cup

Unlike previous games, there is no Elite Four in the Galar region. Their place is instead taken by the Champion Cup, a tournament where Trainers compete for the right to challenge the current Champion. In the semifinals, Gym Challengers compete against each other, and the winner proceeds to the finals, where they join a tournament otherwise completely occupied by the Gym Leaders. The winner of the finals is granted the right to challenge the Champion.

Pokémon

See Category:Generation VIII Pokémon

Game-exclusive Pokémon

Main Game

Isle of Armor

Crown Tundra

  • Wild male Indeedee is exclusive to Pokémon Sword, while wild female Indeedee is exclusive to Pokémon Shield. However, both genders can be obtained in either game through breeding.
  • Wild male Meowstic is exclusive to Pokémon Sword, while wild female Meowstic is exclusive to Pokémon Shield. However, both genders can be obtained by evolving Espurr of the appropriate gender.
  • Wild Sawk is exclusive to Pokémon Sword, while wild Throh is exclusive to Pokémon Shield. However, there is an in-game trade in Circhester where the player can trade a Vanillish to obtain ThrohSw or SawkSh.
  • Cosmoem evolve into Solgaleo in Pokémon Sword, and Lunala in Pokémon Shield.
  • With the exception of Zacian and Zamazenta, all of these Pokémon can be obtained in either version by joining other players' Max Raid Battles via the Y-Comm or Max Lair.

Game-exclusive Gigantamax Pokémon

  • During normal gameplay, GigantamaxMachamp are exclusive to Sword, and Gigantamax Gengar to Shield. However, they have been made available by Wild Area News. Additionally, if the player has purchased the Pokémon Sword Expansion Pass or the Pokémon Shield Expansion Pass, they can obtain any Gigantamax Pokémon by feeding their Pokémon Max Soup, regardless of which version they are playing.

Compatibility

Pokémon Sword and Shield can connect with Pokémon HOME. This allows it to store and receive Pokémon from Pokémon HOME, including Pokémon from previous generations that were transferred into Pokémon HOME. Users of HOME can transfer Pokémon freely between other Sword and Shield savefiles on the console, even if the files belong to different profiles. Through the mobile version of HOME, players can trade those Pokémon through the GTS, not natively featured in Sword and Shield, and the Wonder Box, a feature similar to Sword and Shield's Surprise Trade and the Wonder Trade of previous games.

Only Pokémon in the Galar Pokédex and a select few "foreign" Pokémon can be transferred to Pokémon Sword and Shield. Two patches were released with each iteration of the Pokémon Sword and Shield Expansion Pass which increased the number of Pokémon that can exist in Pokémon Sword and Shield, regardless of whether or not the player purchased the Expansion Pass.

Supported Pokémon

All Pokémon in the Galar Pokédex, Isle of Armor Pokédex, and Crown Tundra Pokédex (including all regional forms) can be transferred to Pokémon Sword and Shield.

In addition to Pokémon in the Galar, Isle of Armor, and Crown Tundra Pokédexes, the following select Pokémon can also be transferred to Pokémon Sword and Shield.

Unusable moves

Main article: List of moves by availability (Generation VIII)

In Pokémon Sword and Shield, many moves are no longer usable. Pokémon do not normally learn these moves in the game, and if a Pokémon does know one of these moves (e.g. due to being transferred from Pokémon HOME), it will not be able to use it. If the move is forgotten, Jack will not be able to teach it again, even if it is a special move that the Pokémon normally would be able to relearn.

In lieu of their usual descriptions, most of these moves instead have the following generic description: "This move can't be used. It's recommended that this move is forgotten. Once forgotten, this move can't be remembered." The unusable moves that do not have this description are usually moves that cannot be legitimately known by any Pokémon that exists in Pokémon Sword and Shield, typically being signature moves or moves which only a small group of Pokémon can know.

Sours: https://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon_Sword_and_Shield
Pokémon Sword \u0026 Shield - Full Game Walkthrough

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