Inexpensive chinese pellet pistol

Inexpensive chinese pellet pistol DEFAULT

Homicide Using an Air Weapon

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Sours: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6682219/

4.0 out of 5 starsTLDR: Fun to practice with

Reviewed in the United States on November 7, 2013

Verified Purchase

I purchased this air pistol for the reason that I had some .22 pellets kicking around. Being that is a Chinese import costing only $30 I didn't expect much, especially considering that the piston is relatively small compared to full-sized pellet guns.
The operation is simple: The barrel breaks downward, you insert the pellet, you close it, point it and fire. The instructions, while humorously Engrish-y, were pretty straight-forward and did a fine job explaining how the pistol operated. They also explained that the item is coated in a packing grease to rust-proof it during shipping and that this grease must be cleaned off prior to shooting. I don't understand how anyone can use these things without cleaning the grease off first, or whatever else they expect for $30, but problems related to this exact thing seem common. TIP: Clean the gun off, then lubricate it, Marvel Mystery oil works great at doing both.
This pistol is not without minor problems, but they can be fixed easily. The first for me being that the wood above the trigger had a nasty edge in the trigger well. I fixed this with a file. Problem solved.
Second problem was the sights, they seemed to be poorly milled, and may have been hot when they were set, so the pistol shot rather high. I fixed this with a hacksaw and the aforementioned file. Problem solved.
The third problem is that the velocity is humorously low right out of the box. If I had to guess it's probably 500 FPS. It shoots like a paintball gun and the pellets ricochet off plywood at ten yards, but it is still an absolute blast to shoot. At some point I may look into what other people may have done to increase the tension in the powerplant, but that's a don't-try-this-at-home sort of thing for another day.
The final problem is that the pellets provided with the pistol are crap, but not entirely useless. You see, airguns like these must be broken-in before they can shoot with any consistency, so the 200 crap pellets that are included are not exactly a total waste.
With this pistol you get what you pay for, and quite frankly, it's exceptionally fun to shoot. Makes excellent practice for paintball and I highly recommend it if you are sure that you can deal with it's little idiosyncrasies.

Sours: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/reviews/B00AQLN0FA
  1. 1956 chevy truck patina
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  3. American trails sleeping bags
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Thread: Very Cheap Chinese Air Rifles

a newbie so first let me say hello all. I have 3 of these chinese guns and enough spares to make another 1 or 2.Two were bought new about 6 or 7 years ago. One was standard and cost £30. The second was the de lux with a beech stock i cannot remember the price of the de lux it wasnt de lux or worth the extra money. Others from a local gunshop that were thrown in on some deal and i think were due for the skip. ( 5 mins work to fix one ) I think that all the most important things have allready been said about a good clean and re lube as muddy water best describes what i found in mine when new. I think the reason these guns have such bad reputation is because they are bought on the expectation that you can shoot it straight out of the box and it should outlast your tin of pellets. But my own opinion is they should be seen as nearly finished or projects and its up to the buyer to complete. I bought my first after i had "fixed up" a few old guns and wanted to experiment a bit with "tuning" but wouldnt risk any of my little favourites getting a scratch. I was also curiouse what you could get for £30 and thats is why i bought one. It was the ideal gun for what i wanted as its hard not to improve one of these out of the box. Even dropping it on the floor can smooth it up a bit and maybe straighten the barrel if done with skill. One gun brand new could shoot around corners. Well not that bad but it were far from perfect.
There are a few different variations on the b2 and i have one that has a much nicer stock ,threads on the end of the cylinder and a steel cap that screws on instead of the loose plastic crap on mine. I read somewhere that they are a copy of an older model diana. Not seen one so dont know.
Anyway i done the polish and decent lube plus loctite on the leather washer screw that i found wasnt tightened properly . To stop the cocking link rattling cut up your doc martins and glue a patch of leather to the right spot underneath the cylinder. Anything that moves to lock or unlock the barrel needs to be as slippery as a very slippery thing. Check the plunger and spring for damage and i do mean even on a new gun. Most adjustments can be made with a file. I wont suggest messing with triggers but if your lucky it wont be to heavy.
Now my advice is,dont take MY advice ,but what i did to mine after finishing the the powerplant was to lob a few inches of the barrel and glue on a homemade silencer made from copper plumbing fittings and self tappers. The stock was stripped of the brown paint and looks like pine but i could be mistaken. I like to work with wood and the first stock did look and feel much better when about 4 or 5 coats of poly varnish rubbed down between coats.
I recently carved up the de lux stock and went to town on this one.I also discovered danish oil and wont use varnish again.I hate stained stocks so beech reminds me of milky bar chocolate. I think it will darken with age but i quite like the light colour. This stock is shaped to my hands and i keep picking it up all the time. A 4x20 BSA scope doesnt make the gun more accurate but it helps me see the target. Its more accurate than me and is a fast handling ,smooth ,small, lightweight and very quiet. Its as simple as air guns get and its what i will take with me on the odd ocassion when i visit the woods. Its great for target practice shooting from my house to the bottom of the garden without disturbing the neighbours. Its not an 80k ( i have one of these too ) so dont expect to much power out of the little cylinder but its got enough and is pretty lethal in .177.

Last edited by Deep; 24-01-2005 at 11:23 PM. Reason: I forgot title
Sours: https://www.airgunbbs.com/

inexpensive low end break barrel air rifles

Normally I subscribe to the "You get what you pay for" theory when it comes to tools and toys,  last spring I was reintroduced to air gun shooting,  given the times we are forced to live with it seemed like a good idea considering restricted travel, the shortages and rising costs of guns and ammo, an alternative such as air guns made a lot of sense.

I already have a vintage Sheridan Blue Streak .20 cal. variable pump pneumatic air rifle,  but wanted something more modern and purchased a Gamo nitro piston Swarm wood stocked Bone Collector model in .22 Cal.,  when it arrived I was impressed with it's fit and finish,  it's show itself to be a very accurate mid range pellet rifle and it's been 100% reliable,  it is a bit pellet fussy and the trigger did need a replacement screw to lighten it up to about two pounds, the screw cost me $10.00 w/shipping and required no dismantling of the gun and it took just a few minutes to complete the switch,  it's now eight months and a couple of tins of HNS target & field trophy pellets later and I couldn't be happier with my purchase.

A couple of months ago I happened across a sale at MidwayUSA,  they were offering another wood stocked (I hate polymer stocks) air rifle for $99.00 dollars marked down from $179.99,  it's a Ruger (Umarex) Impact Max .22 cal. also a Nitro piston powered break barrel,  I checked the reviews,  they weren't encouraging,  but it is a pretty gun and it was under a $100.00 dollars,  how much could I loose,  well I bought it, again I was impressed with the fit and finish, and the gun is minute of squirrel accurate out to 25 yds.  ( I haven't shot it out further yet, it did need ssome trigger work, I was able to do it myself with the greatly appreciated help of a fellow member here and again,  I couldn't be happier with my purchase.

One air rifle that I have seen with positive reviews quite a bit over the summer was the Crossman Vantage,  another cheap (or should I say inexpensive) air gun that's shown potential,  the biggest complaint about the rifle is the trigger and the stock finish,  it's actually well finished, it's very smooth and show no sanding marks or other imperfections,  it's just a dull sandy brown,  but again the fit and finish, bluing, and lack of tool marks all point to it's quality of build,  The only reason I hadn't bought one until now is that they've been out of stock most of the time,  it was only luck that a shipment of .177 cal. rifles came in at Pyrimyd Air for again under $100.00 bucks, and again it shoots great right out of the box,  the factory sights were right on at 20 yds. and it's not pellet fussy, it shoots good groups with the several weights and brands of pellets I've tried in it, all close to point of aim,  all I have to do now is choose the one that groups the best and adjust my scope for it.

The reason I decided to post this thread is because I see a lot of threads about RWS, Hatsan, Diana, FW's and other higher priced offerings,  but very little being said about the lower end air guns on the market,  are people not bothering with them because of their lower prices,  are they ashamed to admit that thy onw one or more ?

Personally I can afford the higher priced break barrel air guns, but I'm drawn to the challenge of wringing out the potential of these lower priced air guns and having fun with it,  is anyone else on this forum enjoying their cheap Chinese made springers and gas piston air rifles ?  

Normally I subscribe to the "You get what you pay for" theory when it comes to tools and toys,  last spring I was reintroduced to air gun shooting,  given the times we are forced to live with it seemed like a good idea considering restricted travel, the shortages and rising costs of guns and ammo, an alternative such as air guns made a lot of sense.

I already have a vintage Sheridan Blue Streak .20 cal. variable pump pneumatic air rifle,  but wanted something more modern and purchased a Gamo nitro piston Swarm wood stocked Bone Collector model in .22 Cal.,  when it arrived I was impressed with it's fit and finish,  it's show itself to be a very accurate mid range pellet rifle and it's been 100% reliable,  it is a bit pellet fussy and the trigger did need a replacement screw to lighten it up to about two pounds, the screw cost me $10.00 w/shipping and required no dismantling of the gun and it took just a few minutes to complete the switch,  it's now eight months and a couple of tins of HNS target & field trophy pellets later and I couldn't be happier with my purchase.

A couple of months ago I happened across a sale at MidwayUSA,  they were offering another wood stocked (I hate polymer stocks) air rifle for $99.00 dollars marked down from $179.99,  it's a Ruger (Umarex) Impact Max .22 cal. also a Nitro piston powered break barrel,  I checked the reviews,  they weren't encouraging,  but it is a pretty gun and it was under a $100.00 dollars,  how much could I loose,  well I bought it, again I was impressed with the fit and finish, and the gun is minute of squirrel accurate out to 25 yds.  ( I haven't shot it out further yet, it did need ssome trigger work, I was able to do it myself with the greatly appreciated help of a fellow member here and again,  I couldn't be happier with my purchase.

One air rifle that I have seen with positive reviews quite a bit over the summer was the Crossman Vantage,  another cheap (or should I say inexpensive) air gun that's shown potential,  the biggest complaint about the rifle is the trigger and the stock finish,  it's actually well finished, it's very smooth and show no sanding marks or other imperfections,  it's just a dull sandy brown,  but again the fit and finish, bluing, and lack of tool marks all point to it's quality of build,  The only reason I hadn't bought one until now is that they've been out of stock most of the time,  it was only luck that a shipment of .177 cal. rifles came in at Pyrimyd Air for again under $100.00 bucks, and again it shoots great right out of the box,  the factory sights were right on at 20 yds. and it's not pellet fussy, it shoots good groups with the several weights and brands of pellets I've tried in it, all close to point of aim,  all I have to do now is choose the one that groups the best and adjust my scope for it.

The reason I decided to post this thread is because I see a lot of threads about RWS, Hatsan, Diana, FW's and other higher priced offerings,  but very little being said about the lower end air guns on the market,  are people not bothering with them because of their lower prices,  are they ashamed to admit that thy onw one or more ?

Personally I can afford the higher priced break barrel air guns, but I'm drawn to the challenge of wringing out the potential of these lower priced air guns and having fun with it,  is anyone else on this forum enjoying their cheap Chinese made springers and gas piston air rifles ?  

Sours: https://www.airgunnation.com/topic/inexpensive-low-end-break-barrel-air-rifles/

Pellet pistol chinese inexpensive

Introduction: Add a Breech Safety to a Cheap Chinese Pellet Gun

This is a b3-1 chinese pellet gun, the cheapest pellet gun ever made, and would cut your hand clean off, you've got to ask yourself a question: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk?

You see, these little gems, fun too shoot thou they are, lack an important safety mechanism that prevents the breech slamming shut and amputating your fingers through accident or mechanical failure.

Let's fix that.

Standard disclaimer There are risks inherent in the modification of any weapon, anyone undertaking to modify a weapon based upon the information in this instructable agrees to hold the author blameless for any injury, accident, or death resulting.

Redneck disclaimer, I ain't not no gunsmith, iffen ya'll dun do this don't be blamin' me iffen sumthin goes awry.

Step 1: Disassembly

Check to make sure the weapon is unloaded, then disassemble by removing the screws on either side at the front of the stock and the two screws holding the trigger guard in place.

Lift the action out of the stock, note that the pins holding the trigger mechanism together are free floating and will FALL OUT, wrap a piece of paper around the trigger mechanism and secure with rubber bands.

Step 2: Yada

cock the weapon and immediately block the breech with a piece of wood and use cable ties to hold in place. Use care as the trigger is now exposed and even with the breech block, discharge will destroy the gun.

Step 3: Drill

Drill a 3/16ths hole through the receiver just in front of the breech face. Slip the action carefully back into the stock and mark where you will need to relieve the stock. Make the stock relief cuts with a rat tail file and touch up the stock finish.

Step 4: Reassemble

reassemble the weapon but when replacing the forward right hand screw attach a "Sliding door security pin" (available Home Depot $2)


Step 5: To Use

Cock the weapon. (A smart observer will note that the weapon was NEVER decocked, bonus point to you)
Insert the pin through the holes drilled into the receiver
Load the weapon
slide the pin out
close the breech
aim
fire

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Sours: https://www.instructables.com/Add-a-breech-safety-to-a-cheap-Chinese-pellet-gun/
Chinese Air Pistol .22 Accuracy Test

This page contains information and links to websites that sell precision high-powered air rifles and airgun supplies. Before you slap down your $98 at Walmart for the Crosman RM377, there are a few other guns you should look at first.

Good Places to Shop:
Be sure to consider shipping charges when hunting for the best price. Although they don't have the lowest prices, with $7.00 flat rate shipping and a very informative website, Airgun Express is a good starting point when looking for something new. For scopes and a few guns D&R has prices that are hard to beat. TJ General also has good prices for scopes and RWS guns. I'll be updating this list based upon my in-process purchasing experiences. The asterist (*) in the name indicates I have purchased from this store.

  • Airgun Express* - Flat-rate shipping ($7 per total order) for most items. Guns ship for about $13.
  • TJ General* - This is a regular gun store with some airgun products. Their airgun and scope prices are excellent.
  • Straight Shooters - Near retail prices, but lots of choices, and good information.
  • Airgun Warehouse - Big selection of airgun products. Good prices on some things, pretty fair on most.
  • Airguns USA - The website is a little bit hard to navigate, but these folks carry lots of airgun products.
  • BBgun Superstore - Dispite the BB-gun name, they have lots of pellet-gun stuff.
  • Airgun Depot - Good scope prices, but a little high on the guns.
  • Ultimate Outdoors - Limited airgun supplies, but good prices for some items.
  • On Target Sports - Good prices on BSA air rifle scopes. That's about all they have for airguns.
  • Ponoma Airguns - Best prices for Beeman guns. Not a web store - phone only - no 1-800 numbers.
  • Maccari Custom Airgun Shop - Tune kits and things for folks that are really into their airguns.
  • D&R Sports Center* - Excellent prices on airguns, scopes and pellets.

Popular Air Rifle Manufacturers:
The following is a list of links to some of the more popular airgun manufacturers. Please note the interesting statement which appears on the Beeman repair shop webpage: "Due to the lack of quality and/or parts, we generally WILL NOT repair the following brands: Air Match, Benjamin, Sheridan, Daisy, Crosman, EM-GE, FAS, Haenel, Healthways, Plainsman, Slavia, Smith & Wesson, or Chinese, Russian, Indian, or other inexpensive airguns."

Air Rifle Scopes and Mounts:
Do not put a conventional rifle scope that is not rated for break-barrel airguns on a high powered spring-recoil airgun. The two-way shock from the spring's recoil can trash even the most expensive rifle scope that is not designed to handle this two-way movement. This caution does not apply to pneumatic (pump, piston, and CO2) airguns, which have very little recoil. It isn't the kick that causes a problem, it is the rapid two-way jolt from the spring. A spring-recoil airgun doesn't kick the shooter, it just jolts the scope very intensely. You've been warned.

Besides being two-way shock resistant, there are two other things necessary for a good air rifle scope: adjustable focus and finger adjustable target turrets. An air rifle scopes must be able to focus down to 10 yards or less. Normal hunting rifle scopes may not focus to less than 50 yds. Good air rifle scopes have adjustable objectives (AO) which allow you to focus on your target and can also give you range estimates. Target turrets (TT) are easily accessed finger adjustable knobs for windage and elevation adjustments. With an air rifle, you will need to adjust elevation settings quite often - including when you change pellet types or change the distance to your target. Just for an example, when I change from one pellet type to another I usually have to adjust elevation 6 to 18 clicks for 10 meter target shooting.

Pellet Sellection:
The accuracy of your air rifle depends significantly upon your pellet selection. The process of choosing the pellet that works best for your gun and your shooting conditions requires personal experimentation. This may sound hard to believe, but I noticed the difference very quickly. Shooting at standard 25-foot paper targets fom 40 feet with a scope, I routinely put 8 out of 10 shots in the black with good quality Beeman pellets. When I use really cheap pellets, I hit all over the paper. Click here to read the details about pellet selection from the Air Rifle Network.

Information to help you choose the right gun:
Precision air rifles are the most accurate close-range target guns in the world, with many models capable of shooting target groups at 30 yards which span less than 1/10 of an inch center to center. A reasonably good entry level model with scope can be purchased for less than $200, but top of the line models run well over $2000. These are not the kind of guns you will find at your local Walmart, and even most local gun shops have a very limited selection. However, this is changing. According to the National Rifle Association, Air Rifle Field Target Shooting is one of only three classes of shooting competition events that has gained in popularity in the past decade.

A further important point about accuracy is that some spring-recoil rifles have a substancial break-in period and may not smooth out until after 500 to 1000 shots have been fired. Now you know why used guns cost almost as much as new guns - they shoot better. Also, don't take the oil recommendations for your gun lightly. If too much oil or the wrong kind of oil gets into your spring-recoil compression chamber, it will cause an effect called dieseling. This is when the vapor from the oil detonates due to the sudden high compression. You can smell it and often see the smoke when this happen, even if you don't feel it. Also, your shots will loose power and go all over the target. Most spring-recoil guns require very little if any oil to be applied to the chamber. For example, many of the Beeman guns receive chamber lubricants only when factory serviced, and RWS guns specify a small drop every 2000 shots or so (with a special silicon based oil). Go ahead and spend the $4 to get the right stuff.

Sours: https://cflsurf.com/airguns.html

You will also be interested:

Air Pistols made in China

If you are interested in import, export, or wholesale purchase of air pistols, there’s no better place than AmmoTerra to find a buyer or supplier of military equipment.

 

An air pistol is a type of weapon that uses compressed gas or air to fire projectiles (bullets). In the case of air pistols no chemical reaction happens in the gun when it is fired, as opposed to regular firearm pistols that use oxidation and subsequent combustion of gunpowder and other propellants to create enough force to fire a bullet. Another difference between air guns and firearms is the type of bullet used: air pistols and rifles use spheres or pellets shaped like diabolos and made from metal. Some air guns also shoot arrow-shaped bullets and darts. Contrary to the popular belief, air pistols are not only used for sports and self-defence, they are also very popular in hunting and warfare. 

 

AmmoTerra features a wide selection of air pistols by Mendoza, Norinco, Air Arms and other world-class manufacturers. Visit ammoterra.com to select a suitable air pistol that fits your needs and then contact the manufacturer directly through our website to make a deal. 
 

Sours: https://ammoterra.com/air-pistolsmade-in-china-manufacturer


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