Aviano air base

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Travel within Italy is: Partially open. See details.

There are 7 ways to get from Aviano Air Base to Pisa by train, bus, night train, car, shuttle or plane

Select an option below to see step-by-step directions and to compare ticket prices and travel times in Rome2rio's travel planner.

Recommended

Train

  1. Take the train from Fontanafredda to Venezia Mestre
  2. Take the train from Venezia Mestre to Firenze S.M.N.
  3. Take the train from Firenze S.M.N. to Pisa Centrale

Cheapest

Train, bus, night train

  1. Take the train from Pordenone to Treviso Centrale
  2. Take the bus from Treviso to Padova
  3. Take the night train from Padova to Pisa Centrale

Bus, train

  1. Take the bus from Pordenone Central Train Station to Bologna Terminal Bus 200 MT Da Stazione FS
  2. Take the train from Bologna Centrale to Firenze S.M.N.
  3. Take the bus from Piazza Stazione to Pisa Airport

Drive

  1. Drive from Aviano Air Base to Pisa

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Travel safe during COVID-19

Rules to follow in Italy

Travel within Italy

Observe COVID-19 safety rules
Nationwide control measures in place
Inter-regional travel is permitted
Health pass is required for long-distance travel by plane, train or coach, as well as in some public venues

Frequently Asked Questions


What are the travel restrictions in Pisa?

Domestic travel is not restricted, but some conditions may apply

  • Face masks are mandatory
  • There is a social distancing requirement of 1.5 metres
  • Observe COVID-19 safety rules
  • Nationwide control measures in place
  • Inter-regional travel is permitted
  • Health pass is required for long-distance travel by plane, train or coach, as well as in some public venues
Explore travel options

What is the national COVID-19 helpline number in Pisa?

The national COVID-19 helpline number in Pisa is 1500.

Do I have to wear a face mask on public transport in Pisa?

Wearing a face mask on public transport in Pisa is mandatory.

Is it compulsory to practice social distancing in Pisa?

The social distance requirement in Pisa is 1.5 metres.

What should I do if I have COVID-19 symptoms when I arrive in Pisa?

Make yourself known to an official member of staff and/or call the national coronavirus helpline number on 1500.

Last updated: 14 Oct 2021
Exceptions may apply, for full details: European Union.

We're working around the clock to bring you the latest COVID-19 travel updates.
This information is compiled from official sources. To the best of our knowledge, it is correct as of the last update.
Visit Rome2rio travel advice for general help.

Questions & Answers

What is the cheapest way to get from Aviano Air Base to Pisa?

The cheapest way to get from Aviano Air Base to Pisa is to drive which costs €50 - €75 and takes 4h 3m.

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What is the fastest way to get from Aviano Air Base to Pisa?

The fastest way to get from Aviano Air Base to Pisa is to drive which takes 4h 3m and costs €50 - €75.

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How far is it from Aviano Air Base to Pisa?

The distance between Aviano Air Base and Pisa is 311 km. The road distance is 395.7 km.

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How do I travel from Aviano Air Base to Pisa without a car?

The best way to get from Aviano Air Base to Pisa without a car is to train which takes 5h 29m and costs €50 - €130.

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How long does it take to get from Aviano Air Base to Pisa?

It takes approximately 5h 29m to get from Aviano Air Base to Pisa, including transfers.

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How long is the flight from Aviano Air Base to Pisa?

There is no direct flight from Venice Airport to Pisa Airport. The quickest flight takes 3h 50m and has one stopover.

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Can I drive from Aviano Air Base to Pisa?

Yes, the driving distance between Aviano Air Base to Pisa is 396 km. It takes approximately 4h 3m to drive from Aviano Air Base to Pisa.

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Which airlines fly from Venice Airport to Pisa Airport?

KLM, Transavia Holland, easyJet and five other airlines offer flights from Venice Airport to Pisa Airport.

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Where can I stay near Pisa?

There are 2663+ hotels available in Pisa. Prices start at €87 per night.

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What companies run services between Aviano Air Base, Italy and Pisa, Italy?

You can take a train from Aviano Air Base to Pisa via Fontanafredda, Venezia Mestre, and Firenze S.M.N. in around 5h 29m.

Ryanair
Ryanair
Website
ryanair.com
Ave. Duration
5h 15m
When
Monday to Saturday
Estimated price
€23 - €330
Ave. Duration
4h 25m
When
Sunday
Estimated price
€24 - €130
Ave. Duration
4h 30m
When
Thursday and Saturday
Estimated price
€24 - €130
Ave. Duration
5h 10m
When
Every day
Estimated price
€24 - €130
Ave. Duration
3h 55m
When
Monday, Thursday, Friday and Sunday
Estimated price
€80 - €750
Ave. Duration
5h 10m
When
Wednesday and Friday
Estimated price
€80 - €750
Lufthansa
Lufthansa
Website
lufthansa.com
Ave. Duration
4h 2m
When
Every day
Estimated price
€140 - €240
Ave. Duration
6h 25m
When
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday
Estimated price
€250 - €1100
Ave. Duration
6h 15m
When
Every day
Estimated price
€250 - €1100
KLM
KLM
Website
klm.com
Ave. Duration
8h 5m
When
Monday and Thursday
Estimated price
€60 - €270
Ave. Duration
5h 26m
When
Every day
Estimated price
€190 - €950
Air France
Air France
Website
airfrance.com
Ave. Duration
5h 3m
When
Every day
Estimated price
€230 - €4300
easyJet
easyJet
Website
easyjet.com
Ave. Duration
4h 55m
When
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday
Estimated price
€55 - €220
Norwegian Air International
Norwegian Air International
Website
norwegian.com
Ave. Duration
6h 35m
When
Wednesday
Estimated price
€60 - €370
British Airways
British Airways
Website
britishairways.com
Ave. Duration
6h 35m
When
Saturday
Estimated price
€80 - €370
Alitalia
Alitalia
Website
alitalia.com
Ave. Duration
3h 25m
When
Every day
Estimated price
€120 - €900
Austrian Airlines
Austrian Airlines
Website
austrian.com
Ave. Duration
3h 45m
When
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
Estimated price
€250 - €1200
Air Dolomiti
Air Dolomiti
Website
airdolomiti.it
Ave. Duration
6h 25m
When
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday
Estimated price
€250 - €1100
Iberia
Iberia
Website
iberia.com
Ave. Duration
7h 20m
When
Monday, Tuesday, Friday and Saturday
Estimated price
€130 - €600
Trenitalia
Trenitalia

The primary train operator in Italy, Trenitalia was created in the year 2000. Trenitalia offers national rail connections in Italy as well as international connections to Austria, France, Germany and Switzerland. The company operates regional and long-distance trains, as well as high-speed trains called Frecce that travel on specialised tracks on speeds of up to 360km/h. Trenitalia tickets are available online, in stations across the country or from many travel agents that offer bookings.

Phone
+39 06 68475475
Website
trenitalia.com
Ave. Duration
1h 17m
Frequency
Every 2 hours
Estimated price
€5 - €11
Website
Trenitalia
1st Class
€9 - €11
Ave. Duration
1h
Frequency
Every 30 minutes
Estimated price
€5 - €12
Website
Trenitalia
1st Class
€10 - €12
Ave. Duration
1h 51m
Frequency
6 times a week
Estimated price
€6 - €14
Website
Trenitalia
1st Class
€12 - €14
Ave. Duration
54 min
Frequency
Hourly
Estimated price
€4 - €9
Website
Trenitalia
1st Class
€8 - €9
Ave. Duration
54 min
Frequency
Every 30 minutes
Estimated price
€5 - €12
Website
Trenitalia
1st Class
€10 - €12

Is there Wi-Fi on Trenitalia?

Yes - Wi-Fi is available on both Frecciarossa and Frecciargento services, and may be accessed free of charge. Services require either a mobile phone number or credit card for verification purposes and allow access for 24 hours.

Are there power outlets on Trenitalia?

Yes - Frecce services include a power socket for each seat.

Does Trenitalia offer meals or snacks?

Yes - Frecciarossa and Frecciargento services often offer bar and restaurant options, though this depends on the individual route and train type. Business, Premium and First Class tickets include a complimentary drink and snack. Some services may offer restaurant, FRECCIABistro or pre-booked, in-seat meal options. Please check your service as options vary.

For more information, please visit this page
Railjet
Railjet

Railjet trains operate domestically within Austria and also connect to major cities in Germany, Czech Republic, Italy, Switzerland and Hungary. This premium service runs at speeds of up to 230km/h and offers three travel classes (economy, first and business), all with free Wi-Fi and power sockets. Other amenities include a bistro-restaurant car and family zones. Seat reservations can be made up to 90 days prior to the train's departure (compulsory for all cross-border trains but not for domestic routes).

Phone
+43 51717
Website
oebb.at
Ave. Duration
39 min
Frequency
Twice daily
Estimated price
€13 - €20
Website
Railjet

Want to know more about travelling around Italy

Rome2rio's Travel Guide series provide vital information for the global traveller. Filled with useful and timely travel information, the guides answer all the hard questions - such as 'How do I buy a ticket?', 'Should I book online before I travel? ', 'How much should I expect to pay?', 'Do the trains and buses have Wifi?' - to help you get the most out of your next trip.

Flag of ItalyPisa, Italy

Pisa is a city and comune in Tuscany, central Italy, straddling the Arno just before it empties into the Ligurian Sea. It is the capital city of the Province of Pisa. Although Pisa is known worldwide for its leaning tower (the bell tower of the city's cathedral), the city of over 91,104 residents (around 200,000 with the metropolitan area) contains more than 20 other historic churches, several medieval palaces, and various bridges across the Arno. Much of the city's architecture was financed from its history as one of the Italian maritime republics. - Wikipedia

Things to do in Pisa

  • Leaning Tower of Pisa

    The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Italian: Torre pendente di Pisa) or simply the Tower of Pisa is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa, known worldwide for its unintended tilt. The tower is situated behind the Pisa Cathedral and is the third oldest structure in the city's Cathedral Square (Piazza del Duomo), after the cathedral and the Pisa Baptistry.

  • Pisa Cathedral

    Pisa Cathedral (Italian: Cattedrale Metropolitana Primaziale di Santa Maria Assunta; Duomo di Pisa) is a medieval Roman Catholic cathedral dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, in the Piazza dei Miracoli in Pisa, Italy. It is a notable example of Romanesque architecture, in particular the style known as Pisan Romanesque. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Pisa.

  • Camposanto Monumentale

    The Campo Santo, also known as Camposanto Monumentale ("monumental cemetery") or Camposanto Vecchio ("old cemetery"), is a historical edifice at the northern edge of the Cathedral Square in Pisa, Italy.

  • Palazzo Blu

    Palazzo Blu is a center for temporary exhibitions and cultural activities located in 9 Lungarno Gambacorti, in the heart of the historic center of Pisa, Italy. This museum is managed by the Fondazione Palazzo Blu (a foundation funded by Fondazione Pisa), and is located in the Palazzo Giuli Rosselmini Gualandi (and Palazzo Casarosa), ancient palace restored by the Fondazione Pisa. Its name comes from the blue color uncovered during an architectural recent restoration, and attributable to the taste of Russian owners who acquired the Palazzo in the eighteenth century.

Places to stay in Pisa

Rome2rio makes travelling from Aviano Air Base to Pisa easy.

Rome2rio is a door-to-door travel information and booking engine, helping you get to and from any location in the world. Find all the transport options for your trip from Aviano Air Base to Pisa right here. Rome2rio displays up to date schedules, route maps, journey times and estimated fares from relevant transport operators, ensuring you can make an informed decision about which option will suit you best. Rome2rio also offers online bookings for selected operators, making reservations easy and straightforward.

Sours: https://www.rome2rio.com/s/Aviano-Air-Base/Pisa

Aviano Air Base

Aviano Air Base (IATA: AVB, ICAO: LIPA) (Italian: Base aerea di Aviano) is a base in northeastern Italy, in the Friuli-Venezia Giuliaregion. It is located in the Aviano municipality, at the foot of the Carnic Pre-Alps or Southern Carnic Alps, about 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) from Pordenone.

The Italian Air Force has ownership, and administrative and military[1] control of the base. It hosts the U.S. Air Force's 31st Fighter Wing and is believed to host nuclear weapons.[4]

The 31st Fighter Wing is the only U.S. fighter wing south of the Alps. This strategic location makes the wing critical to operations in NATO's southern region.[5] The 31st Fighter Wing maintains two F-16 fighter squadrons, the 555th Fighter Squadron and the 510th Fighter Squadron, allowing the wing to conduct offensive and defensive combat air operations.

History[edit]

Aviano Air Base was established by the Italian government in 1911, and was used as training base for Italian pilots and construction facility for aircraft parts. During World War I, Italy used the airfield in missions against the Austro-Hungarian and German armies. At that time, two Italian aviators, Captain Maurizio Pagliano and Lieutenant Luigi Gori, conducted an unauthorized and unsuccessful but heroic, air raid on the Austrian naval yards in Pula, in what is now Croatia. In their honor, the base's name was changed to Aeroporto Pagliano e Gori in 1919. During the war the airfield was also overrun by the Austro-German army between November 1917 and November 1918. After World War I, the airfield was again used as a training base.

During World War II, both the Italian Air Force and the GermanLuftwaffe flew missions from Aeroporto Pagliano e Gori. British forces captured the base in 1945; they conducted air operations there until 1947, when the Italian Air Force resumed operational use of the airport.

The 1976 earthquake caused no damage.

Hurricane Andrew and Balkan operations[edit]

As part of the most extensive restructuring since the Air Force became a separate service, the Tactical Air Command was deactivated and the Air Combat Command was activated and the 31st Tactical Fighter Wing was redesignated to its current name, the 31st Fighter Wing.[6]

Activation ceremony for the 31st Fighter Wing at Aviano Air Base on 1 April 1994

To avoid losing the wing's heritage and history as the highest scoring Army Air Force unit in the Mediterranean Theater in WW II, the impressive combat record in Vietnam and number of significant firsts they produced in the early years of the Air Force, the 31st Fighter Wing was chosen to move rather than fade into obscurity. On 1 April 1994, the 31st Fighter Wing inactivated at Homestead AFB and subsequently activated at Aviano Air Base, Italy, in place of the 401st Fighter Wing.[7]

The 31st Fighter Wing received two new squadrons at that time, the 555th and 510th Fighter Squadrons, along with their Block-40 F-16s. The wing immediately became involved with events in Bosnia, part of the former communist country of Yugoslavia, in May 1994 as part of Operation Deny Flight. In June 1995, a massive search and rescue operation took place to extract Captain Scott O'Grady of the 555th Fighter Squadron who was shot down over Bosnian-Serb controlled territory in Bosnia. A U.S. Marine CorpsCH-53 picked him up after he evaded capture for six days.[8]

Timeline of Balkan Operations, 31st Fighter Wing

In August and September, Operation Deliberate Force began and the 31st Fighter Wing conducted air strikes against Bosnian Serbs to give the Muslim forces an upper hand in the conflict. Peacekeeping operations continued in the Balkans through the end of 2004, when the European Union assumed responsibility for the region.[9]

In 1999, U.S. Air Forces in Europe activated the 31st Air Expeditionary Wing-Noble Anvil at Aviano for Operation Allied Force in the Province of Kosovo, which was not authorized by the UN Security Council. Assigned under a joint task force, the 31st Air Expeditionary Wing flew from Aviano and joined NATO allies in a 78-day air campaign against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia). From 24 March to 10 June 1999, the 31st Air Expeditionary Wing, the largest expeditionary wing in Air Force history flew nearly 9,000 combat sorties and accumulated almost 40,000 hours of combat service over the skies of Kosovo, Serbia and the rest of the Balkans in support of NATO operations. The wing accomplished much during OAF as the two permanently assigned flying squadrons, the 510th and 555th, flew more than 2,400 combined sorties and more than 10,000 combat hours.[10]

Operations in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya[edit]

Emblem of the 31st Air Expeditionary Wing

In 2000, the wing began deployments in support of the Expeditionary Air Force. From March to September 2000, the 510th and 555th Fighter Squadrons conducted back-to-back deployments to Ahmad al-Jaber AB, Kuwait, in support of Operation Southern Watch. While at Al Jaber, the squadrons flew more than 400 combat sorties.

From June through December 2001, the fighter squadrons deployed combat search and rescue capabilities three times and helped enforce the no-fly zone over Iraq.

From August to December 2002, the 510th Fighter Squadron and 603rd Air Control Squadron returned to Southwest Asia. The two squadrons supported Operation Enduring Freedom.

Simultaneously, the 555th deployed personnel and aircraft to Decimomannu Air Base, Sardinia, while the runway at Aviano was closed for repairs.

The wing's support of Operation Iraqi Freedom began in late 2003. Aviano served as the launch point for airborne/air-land insertion of airborne forces opening a second front in northern Iraq. During that time, the wing secured, bedded and fed more than 2,300 Army and Air Force personnel. The operation, the largest airborne operation since 1989, constituted 62 missions, transporting 2,146 passengers and 2,433.7 tons of cargo.

Since the beginning of combat operations in Iraq, forces from the wing have been on regular combat rotations into the region. In late 2003, the wing's 603rd Air Control Squadron became the first unit from the wing to deploy to Iraq. They also relocated their entire operation from Baghdad International Airport to Balad Air Base. Under combat conditions, the squadron transferred $73 million in equipment and more than 100 personnel with 20 convoys. On 10 April 2004, insurgents launched a mortar attack on Balad, killing Airman 1st Class Antoine Holt and injuring two other 603rd Air Control Squadron members. Airman Holt's death constituted the 31st Fighter Wing's first combat fatality since the Vietnam War.

The 31st Fighter Wing continued deploying forces in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, with more than one-third of the wing deploying to support operations each year from 2003 to 2007.

In 2007, the 555th Fighter Squadron deployed to Kunsan Air Base in the Republic of Korea.

Since arriving at Aviano, the wing has also participated in numerous training exercises with international partners, including training deployments to Latvia, the Czech Republic, Romania, Bulgaria, Spain, Slovenia and Poland.

In March 2011, the 31st Fighter Wing played a major role in the United Nations' response to the crisis in Libya, known as Operation Odyssey Dawn, in enforcing no-fly zone.[11] The wing hosted four flying units and more than 1,350 personnel during the 15-day operation, 17 to 31 March. It worked around the clock to launch 2,250 flying operations out of Aviano Air Base. As Operation Odyssey Dawn came to an end on 31 March, so began Operation Unified Protector, with NATO taking the lead until the operation's conclusion 31 October of that year.[7]

Aviano F-16s again returned to the skies over Libya in June 2014. Due to significant fighting in Tripoli during the 2014 Libyan conflict the U.S embassy was evacuated. During a five-hour non-combatant evacuation operation, three F-16s launched from Aviano guarded the evacuation of American citizens as embassy staff and U.S marines convoyed overland from Tripoli into Tunisia.[12][13]

Cavalese cable-car disaster[edit]

Main article: Cavalese cable car disaster (1998)

In the Cavalese cable car disaster, on 3 February 1998, a U.S. Marine Corps jet flying too low on a training exercise from Aviano Air Base severed a cable car's cable over the Alps at Cavalese, Italy, causing 20 deaths.[14]

Imam rapito affair[edit]

See also: Imam rapito affair

On 4 November 2009, the conviction by an Italian court of 22 CIA agents, a U.S. Air Force colonel and two Italian SISMI secret agents confirmed the role of the Aviano Air Base in the kidnapping, on 17 February 2003, of Hassan Mustafa Osama Nasr, in the so-called "extraordinary rendition" program.[15] The man, abducted in Milan by CIA agents, was taken to Aviano Air Base for interrogation before being transported via Ramstein Air Base in Germany to Alexandria, Egypt, and turned over to the custody of Egypt's State Security Intelligence.[15][16][17]

Infrastructure and facilities[edit]

  • Area A1 contains a few of Aviano's support functions (such as the library and chapel) and the Department of Defense Dependents School for the base population's children.
  • Area A2 contains a fitness center, dining facility, dormitories, thrift shop and a fire department.
  • Area C contains most of the 31st Civil Engineer Squadron's facilities.
  • Area D contains a football field and picnic area.
  • Area E contains the Carabinieri (Italian gendarmerie that enforces the law on the base) headquarters in this area. It contains also an Armed Forces Network station, military working dog kennels, and an Air Force Office of Special Investigations detachment.
  • Area F is the flightline area, and is the largest area in Aviano. The complex contains the active runway and taxiways, as well as most of the base's facilities, which include a commissary and base exchange.

Role and operations[edit]

31st Fighter Wing[edit]

The 31st Fighter Wing is made up of four groups, each consisting of several squadrons.

The 31st Operations Group ensures the combat readiness of two F-16CG squadrons, one air control squadron, and one operational support squadron conducting and supporting worldwide air operations. The group prepares fighter pilots, controllers, and support personnel to execute U.S. and NATO war plans and contingency operations. It trains, equips, plans, and provides weather, intelligence, standardization/evaluation, and command and control sustaining global flying operations.[18]

The 31st Maintenance Group provides peacetime and combat maintenance and munitions control, and executive support for the 31st Fighter Wing, geographically separated units under the command and control of the wing, and units gained during advanced stages of readiness. The 31st MXG also responds to humanitarian and contingency logistics support requirements as directed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff through Headquarters U.S. Air Forces Europe to locations in Europe, Africa, and Southwest Asia.[19]

The 31st Mission Support Group's goal is to provide infrastructure and service to support a premiere combat capability and quality of life to the 31st Fighter Wing, Aviano community and multiple geographically separated units.[20]

The 31st Medical Group supports the readiness of 31st Fighter Wing and associated units throughout the Southern Region, ensuring the health of its community by providing optimal patient-focused medical care from internal, Department of Defense and Host Nation resources. The unit employs medical resources and preventive initiatives to ensure Airmen remain mission ready to support the Expeditionary Air Force, U.S. and NATO objectives worldwide.[21]

Based units[edit]

Flying and notable non-flying units based at Aviano Air Base.[22][23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Some of this text in an early version of this article was taken from pages on the Aviano Air Base website, which as a work of the U.S. Government is presumed to be a public domain resource. That information was supplemented by:

  • Donald, David (2004) Century Jets: USAF Frontline Fighters of the Cold War. AIRtime ISBN 1-880588-68-4
  • Endicott, Judy G. (1999) Active Air Force wings as of 1 October 1995; USAF active flying, space, and missile squadrons as of 1 October 1995. Maxwell AFB, Alabama: Office of Air Force History. CD-ROM.
  • Fletcher, Harry R. (1989) Air Force Bases Volume II, Active Air Force Bases outside the United States of America on 17 September 1982. Maxwell AFB, Alabama: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0-912799-53-6
  • Martin, Patrick (1994). Tail Code: The Complete History of USAF Tactical Aircraft Tail Code Markings. Schiffer Military Aviation History. ISBN 0-88740-513-4.
  • Ravenstein, Charles A. (1984). Air Force Combat Wings Lineage and Honors Histories 1947–1977. Maxwell AFB, Alabama: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0-912799-12-9.
  • Rogers, Brian (2005). United States Air Force Unit Designations Since 1978. Hinkley, England: Midland Publications. ISBN 1-85780-197-0.
  • USAAS-USAAC-USAAF-USAF Aircraft Serial Numbers—1908 to present

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aviano_Air_Base
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REPROCUREMENT OF THE COLLOCATED CLUB – AVIANO AIR BASE (PN)

Reprocurement of the collocated Club - Aviano Air Base (PN)

New officers club located inside the air base. The building has an area of about 2,100 square meters. and includes - on the ground floor: reception, bar, restaurant, kitchen, living rooms and rooms dedicated to billiards, cards, etc. On the first floor: technical rooms. In particular, the "turnkey" type of contract includes: reinforced concrete structure on place and reinforced anti-seismic masonry, plant works and special ones, special flooring and coatings "by cells", mobile partition walls, supply of "customized" interior furnishings, supply and installation of equipment for central kitchen, external works (about 31,000 square meters), including underground utilities, parking lots, main entrance, pedestrian trails and landscaping.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

Employer:Dipartimento degli Stati Uniti residente ufficiale della marina responsabile del contratto (ROICC)

Works amount:€ 15.354.812,38

Works start:6 December 2001

Works end:24 April 2004
Sours: https://www.gruppoicm.com/en/projects-building/item/reprocurement-of-the-collocated-club-aviano-air-base-pn
alert notification Continue growing your career while overseas! Visit the Community Bank Careers page for employment opportunities.atm notification Sagami Depot ATM is currently out of service.
Community Bank logo

Hours/Contact

    • Closest city: Aviano, Italy
    • Location: Bldg. #176
    • Phone: 0434668211
    • DSN: 632-1988
    • Hours: Mon-Fri: 0900-1600
Sign Into Online Banking to request an appointment or contact your banking center. Not a customer? Please call the banking center directly.

ATMs

    • ATM in: Shoppette Complex
    • Location: Bldg. #1407 - Area F
    • ATM in: Aviano BX
    • Location: Bldg. #1411 - Area F
    • ATM in: Mini Mall
    • Location: Bldg. #179 - Area 1
    • ATM in: USAFE HQ
    • Location: Bldg. #5294 - Ghedi AB
    • ATM in: Aviano Commissary
    • Location: Bldg. #1411 - Area F

Holiday Closures

    • Veterans Day
    • Thu Nov 11, 2021
    • Thanksgiving Day
    • Thu Nov 25, 2021
    • In Lieu of Christmas Day
    • Fri Dec 24, 2021
Sours: https://www.dodcommunitybank.com/home/locations/italy/aviano

Base aviano air

Aviano

1Spot 1 - 05 approach

The first spot is the approach of runway 05 along road SP31. From here you have a good view of the aircraft approaching the base (either reading or photography) and taking off (reading only). Position yourself behind the tree line to keep a low profile, however photography will be resticted due to the same tree line. In summer the field could be used for mais, which is quite high. In winter there will be no crop so you will be quite exposed. For photography it is advised to move to spot 2. To get to spot 1 head for the SP31 in Roveredo in Piano (towards Budoia). Park your car at the restaurant you will pass at your left and walk towards this spot.

2Spot 2 - 05 approach

The photographic and advised alternative to spot 1. This spot, more hidden from the public road, can be reached by walking from the SP31 to the West along the water drainage ditch. Cross this ditch when you are next to the apple tree field to have the best position. You will need 350 mm digital for the local F-16s. You can park your car at the small restaurant at your left or continue this road to the left of the SP13 to park at the first dirt road to the right. From here walk to the same apple tree field.

3Spot 3 - 05 approach PM

This is the late afternoon spot for runway 05. From 4PM the sun has headed for the West that much that you can reposition to this spot along the SP31 to avoid facing the sun.

4Spot 4 - 23 approach

This spot is a good one if runway 23 is in use or for some nice banking fighters in departure from 08. From here you can photograph and read the aircraft coming in (and read the ones taking off). Standing on the road is not advisable as you are exposed to any police or all other traffic on this busy road. Driving to Aviano along the SP7/Via Pioneri dell'Aria and next to the airfield there is a small house at your right, after you have passed the traffic lights. There is a small road between this house and a small forest. Drive into this road and park your car behind the stone wall. Follow the tree line away from the road which will a bend to the left. At the end there is a high fence but if you stand on the grass field you will have a proper view onto the traffic.

5Spot 5 - 23 approach PM

As with runway 05 you can also reposition yourself along the SP7 when the sun is facing you. After 4PM this position North of spot 4 is an alternative. Again, a position just a bit further away is advised.

Sours: https://www.scramble.nl/planning/airfield-guide/italy/aviano
🇮🇹AVIANO AIR FORCE BASE DORM TOUR🇮🇹

Upgrades At US Nuclear Bases In Europe Acknowledge Security Risk

Security upgrades underway at U.S. Air Force bases in Europe indicate that nuclear weapons deployed in Europe have been stored under unsafe conditions for more than two decades.

Commercial satellite images show work underway at Incirlik Air Base in Turkey and Aviano Air Base in Italy. The upgrades are intended to increase the physical protection of nuclear weapons stored at the two U.S. Air Force Bases.

The upgrades indirectly acknowledge that security at U.S. nuclear weapons storage sites in Europe has been inadequate for more than two decades.

And the decision to upgrade nuclear security perimeters at the two U.S. bases strongly implies that security at the other four European host bases must now be characterized as inadequate.

Security challenges at Incirlik AB are unique in NATO’s nuclear posture because the base is located only 110 kilometers (68 miles) from war-torn Syria and because of an ongoing armed conflict within Turkey between the Turkish authorities and Kurdish militants. The wisdom of deploying NATO’s largest nuclear weapons stockpile in such a volatile region seems questionable. (UPDATE: Pentagon orders “voluntary departure” of 900 family members of U.S. personnel stationed at Incirlik.)

Upgrades at Incirlik Air Base

Incirlik Air Base is the largest nuclear weapons storage site in Europe with 25 underground vaults installed inside as many protective aircraft shelters (PAS) in 1998. Each vault can hold up to four bombs for a maximum total base capacity of 100 bombs. There were 90 B61 nuclear bombs in 2000, or 3-4 bombs per vault. This included 40 bombs earmarked for deliver by Turkish F-16 jets at Balikesir Air Base and Akinci Air Base. There are currently an estimated 50 bombs at the base, or an average of 2-3 bombs in each of the 21 vaults inside the new security perimeter.

The new security perimeter under construction surrounds the so-called “NATO area” with 21 aircraft shelters (the remaining four vaults might be in shelters inside the Cold War alert area that is no longer used for nuclear operations). The security perimeter is a 4,200-meter (2,600-mile) double-fenced with lighting, cameras, intrusion detection, and a vehicle patrol-road running between the two fences. There are five or six access points including three for aircraft. Construction is done by Kuanta Construction for the Aselsan Cooperation under a contract with the Turkish Ministry of Defense.

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In addition to the security perimeter, an upgrade is also planned of the vault support facility garage that is used by the special weapons maintenance trucks (WMT) that drive out to service the B61 bombs inside the aircraft shelters. The vault support facility is located outside the west-end of the security perimeter. The weapons maintenance trucks themselves are also being upgraded and replaced with new Secure Transportable Maintenance System (STMS) trailers.

The nuclear role of Incirlik is unique in NATO’s nuclear posture in that it is the only base in Europe with nuclear weapons that doesn’t have nuclear-capable fighter-bombers permanently present. Even though the Turkish government recently has allowed the U.S. Air Force to fly strikes from Incirlik against targets in Syria, the Turks have declined U.S. requests to permanently base a fighter wing at the base. As such, there is no designated nuclear wing with squadrons of aircraft intended to employ the nuclear bombs stored at Incirlik; in a war, aircraft would have to fly in from wings at other bases to pick up and deliver the weapons.

Upgrades at Aviano Air Base

A nuclear security upgrade is also underway at the U.S. Air Force base near Aviano in northern Italy. Unlike Incirlik, that does not have nuclear-capable aircraft permanently based, Aviano Air Base is home to the 31st Fighter Wing with its two squadrons of nuclear-capable F-16C/Ds: the 510th “Buzzards” Fighter Squadron and the 555th “Triple Nickel” Fighter Squadron. These squadrons have been very busy as part of NATO’s recent response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and some of Aviano’s F-16s are currently operating from Incirlik as part of strike operations in Syria.

A nuclear security upgrade appears to be underway at the U.S. Air Base at Aviano in Italy. Click on image to view full size.

A total of 18 underground nuclear weapons storage vaults were installed in as many protective aircraft shelters at Aviano in 1996 for a maximum total base storage capacity of 72 nuclear bombs. Only 12 of those shelters are inside the new security perimeter under construction at the base. Assuming nuclear weapons will only be stored in vaults inside the new security perimeter in the future, this indicates that the nuclear mission at Aviano may have been reduced.

In 2000, shortly after the original 18 vaults were completed, Aviano stored 50 nuclear bombs, or an average of 2-3 in each vault. The 12 shelters inside the new perimeter (one of which is of a smaller design) would only be able to hold a maximum of 48 weapons if loaded to capacity. If each vault has only 2-3 weapons, it would imply only 25-35 weapons remain at the base.

NATO Nuclear Security Costs

Publicly available information about how much money NATO spends on security upgrades to protect the deployment in Europe is sketchy and incomplete. But U.S. officials have provided some data over the past few years.

In November 2011, three years after the U.S. Air Force Ribbon Review Review in 2008 concluded that “most” nuclear weapons storage sites in Europe did not meet U.S. Department of Defense security standards, James Miller, then Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, informed Congress that NATO would spend $63.4 million in 2011-2012 on security upgrades for munitions storage sites and another $67 million in 2013-2014.

In March 2014, as part of the Fiscal Year 2015 budget request, the U.S. Department of Defense stated that NATO since 2000 had invested over $80 million in infrastructure improvements required to store nuclear weapons within secure facilities in storage sites in Belgium, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and Turkey. Another $154 million was planned for these sites on security improvements to meet with stringent new U.S. standards.

The following month, in April 2014, Andrew Weber, then Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Defense Programs, told Congress that “NATO common funding has paid for over $300 million, approximately 75 percent of the B61 storage security infrastructure and upgrades” in Europe. Elaine Bunn, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear and Missile Defense Policy, added that because host base facilities are funded through individual national budgets, “it is not possible to provide an accurate assessment of exactly how much NATO basing nations have contributed in Fiscal Year 2014 toward NATO nuclear burden sharing, although it is substantial.” Bunn provided additional information that showed funding of security enhancements and upgrades as well as funding of infrastructure upgrades (investment) at the specific European weapon storage sites. This funding, she explained, is provided through the NATO Security Investment Program (NSIP) and there have been four NATO weapons storage-related upgrades (Capability Package upgrades) since the original NATO Capability Package was approved in 2000:

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In addition to the security upgrades underway at Incirlik and Aviano, upgrades of nuclear-related facilities are also underway or planned at national host bases that store U.S. nuclear weapons. This includes a new WS3 vault support facility and a MUNSS (Munitions Support Squadron) Operations Center-Command Post at Kleine Brogel AB in Belgium, and a WS3 vault support facility at Ghedi AB in Italy.

Implications and Recommendations

When I obtained a copy of the U.S. Air Force Blue Ribbon Review report in 2008 under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act and made it available on the FAS Strategic Security Blog, it’s most central finding – that “most” U.S. nuclear weapons storage sites in Europe did not meet U.S. security requirements – was dismissed by government officials in Europe and the United States.

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During a debate in the Dutch Parliament, then Defense Minister Eimert van Middelkoop dismissed the findings saying “safety and security at Volkel are in good order.” A member of the U.S. Congressional delegation that was sent to Europe to investigate told me security problems were minor and could be fixed by routine management, a view echoed in conversations with other officials since then.

Yet seven years and more than $170 million later, construction of improved security perimeters at Incirlik AB and Aviano AB suggest that security of nuclear weapons storage vaults in Europe has been inadequate for the past two and a half decades and that official European and U.S. confidence was misguided (as they were reminded by European peace activists in 2010).

And the security upgrades do raise a pertinent question: since NATO now has decided that it is necessary after all to enhance security perimeters around underground vaults with nuclear weapons at the two U.S. bases at Incirlik and Aviano, doesn’t that mean that security at the four European national bases that currently store nuclear weapons (Büchel, Ghedi, Kleine Brogel, and Volkel) is inadequate? Ghedi reportedly was recently eyed by suspected terrorists arrested by the Italian police.

Just wondering.

This publication was made possible by a grant from the New Land Foundation and Ploughshares Fund. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of the author.

Categories: NATO, Nuclear Weapons, United States

Sours: https://fas.org/blogs/security/2015/09/nuclear-insecurity/

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