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Latch Lake Music MicKing 1100 Straight Mic Stand-Black

The Latch Lake Music MicKing 1100 Straight is built to provide pro functionality in a portable package. Continuing with the use of innovative lever lock systems, this stand maintains the micKing’s stellar strength reputation. For portability we’ve designed a new patent pending weighted 10 lb Symmetric Torque Tripod Base that ensures tripod legs never go bad or droop while tilted. To boost performance we’ve included a precision ram formed mounting point reducing weight where it counts. The Latch Lake Music MicKing 1100 Straight (MK1100ST) shines extremely well for venues, touring, and in-studio as a vocal mic, or a general room mic.

Accessories:

The micKing RetroBoom is born from customer requests to upgrade their tired, old iron-base stands of another brand with the modern-clutch micKing. The RetroBoom delivers the full features of micKing 2200 boom with telescoping reach of 40”-83” and a 7 lb. counterweight. It’s perfect for the studio that appreciates more control of their mics in a very affordable model from Latch Lake. The RB2200 fits standard 5/8″-27 threads and the RB2200AT fits on 7/8″-27 threads. Both versions available in nitride black or chrome (Spin Grip not included).

BLACK

CHROME

The Spin Grip Mic Mount, one of the final tweaks to the original micKing3300, single-handedly fixed the long standing joke of “positionable” microphone mounts. Due to its high popularity within the micKing product line, we made the SGMM a stand alone accessory for owners of non-Latch Lake microphone stands. With a positionable range of 295º, the SGMM utilizes a 3″ disk brake capable of locking the heaviest of microphones in place. Its unique free-spinning thread system allows for spinning the threads on to your microphone instead of spinning your microphone on to the threads. The basic SGMM comes with a 1 x 5/8-27 thread extender (Thread Saver) to facilitate short threads often found on most microphone stands. Its mounting point is a 5/8-27 thread for US microphones. A European adapter is available.

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Latch Lake MicKing

Exactly what sets a mic stand apart from the crowd?

Well-designed mic stands are expensive, but will give you decades of service. They're also the only thing that prevents both the embarrassing 'droopy-stand syndrome' and expensive mics from interfacing disastrously with the floor, so they're an essential investment. The ideal stand is very robust, easy to maintain, has sufficient reach to cope with all likely situations, and is able to support the heaviest of mics with ease and safety, without drooping. The last point requires a heavy boom counterweight, which 'standard' boom stands don't include.

One stand that ticks all the boxes is the Latch Lake MicKing. There are currently three models in the MicKing range: the single-extension 2200, the larger, dual-extension 3300 version, and a hybrid that combines the 2200's mast and boom with the 3300's heavier base-plate. This 'Big Foot' version is the most popular, apparently, and all are available with matt-black or chrome finish.

The MicKing design has several unique features, starting with the surprisingly compact but extremely heavy circular base-plate. The 2200's base weighs 12kg (28lbs) and is 14 inches in diameter, while the16-inch 3300 base weighs 13kg (29lbs). In both cases, 90 percent of the base-plate's mass is located at the circumference, to provide superb stability, and the spoked design allows stands to be 'nested' together for storage. Sturdy wheels fixed to the outside of one of the three weights allow the stand to be moved easily just by leaning it backwards. Another neat feature is that the mic cable can be looped under the spokes to lie flat on the floor and avoid becoming a trip hazard.

The one-inch, hollow steel mast is tapered to fit snugly into a chamfered receptacle in the base-plate, and is secured with a large nut. The 2200 has a single mast extension with a height range of 124-211 cm, while the 3300 model has two extensions to span 129-292 cm. The mast extension lock, the weak point of so many designs, is an ingenious 'Lever Lock' with a curved lever on an eccentric cam that tightens and releases a C-shaped collar around the top of the fixed column tube to clamp the inner extendable section. The design is simple but inherently secure, and no stage-hand gorilla can over-tighten or break anything! If necessary, the operating tension is adjustable with a knurled screw.

The clamps on the boom extensions work in the same way, with ranges of 1.22-3.15m for the 3300 and 1.16-2.39m for the 2200. Another thoughtful design feature is the integral v-shaped channel in each clamp mechanism, which grips the mic cable, providing a very effective cable tidy that's far easier to use than plastic clips or tape.

A very chunky 'boom clutch' sits at the top of the mast extension to control the boom arm's rotation through a 'double disc brake' arrangement, while a wide C-clamp across the top secures the boom arm's longitudinal position. The lever arms for these two clamps are wider than the tube clamps and have two adjustment screws to ensure uniform tension across the full width of the clamp. The 'disc brake' works by squeezing together two pairs of metal plates separated by large neoprene discs, and the resulting friction is immense. The range of boom rotation is deliberately asymmetrical, normally spanning -90 to +45 degrees, relative to the horizontal. This allows the boom to be folded down neatly for storage and permits sufficient microphone height for most applications. However, if the boom arm is installed in the opposite orientation, the articulation becomes +90 to -45 degrees which is useful for applications requiring the maximum possible height — such as when recording cathedral organs (the 3300 model can reach over 6m in this configuration).

A movable and removable 3.2kg (7lb) nickel-plated counterweight attached to the 'blunt' end of the boom arm is clamped with another lever lock. The weight is sufficient to counterbalance the largest and heaviest of microphones, minimising the rotational forces on the boom clutch and ensuring that the boom arm's centre of gravity remains directly over the vertical mast to maximise stability.

The business end of the boom is equipped with a 'Spin Grip Mount' — a 15cm (six inch) vertical 'hanger' to which the mic is attached. Another lever lock arrangement clamps a rotatable plate against a fixed plate via a neoprene disc. The plate is attached securely to the end of the boom arm, while the rotating plate supports the 'spin grip mount'. When unlocked, the 'hanger' is free to rotate for easy attachment of a microphone. The standard Spin Grip Mount terminates in the US standard 5/8-inch, 27tpi (threads per inch) thread, although a 5/8-inch to 3/8-inch adapter is included. If preferred, versions with 3/8-inch, European-standard threads can be supplied to special order at no extra cost.

An optional accessory is the 'Xtra Boom' arm which can be supplied in 12-, 18- or 24-inch lengths and has a standard 5/8-inch thread at one end. The arm extension and rotation is controlled with the same disc clamp arrangement used in the Spin Grip, and that clamp can be fixed to any stand or boom-arm tube with an adjustable open-collar clamp. The Spin Grip Mount is also available separately for fitting to the boom arms of existing stands (although it is quite heavy), or to the end of an Xtra Boom for even greater versatility.

On Test

The Big Foot review stand was supplied with a couple of Xtra Boom arms (see box) and Spin Grip attachments. Fitting the mast to the base was easy and reassuringly secure and, despite it being extremely heavy, moving the stand was impressively easy, as it has only to be tilted back about 30 degrees to engage the wheels. The Lever Locks worked brilliantly and the boom clutch was fantastically secure. I couldn't induce any 'droop' at all, even when swinging on the arm like a deranged rigger! I'm a big fan of vertical hangers like the Spin Grip, which I think make microphone placement considerably easier, and this particular design works extremely well.

I rigged a Soundfield mic, which is the heaviest I mic I have, and found that I could achieve an impressive horizontal reach with perfect balance, thanks to the heavy counterweight. Even when over-extended (ie. unbalanced towards the mic end) the rotary clutch was able to maintain the position easily, and the stand remained impressively stable, despite its small footprint. I also rigged a pseudo-Decca Tree arrangement with three Neumann KM184s, two on a pair of Xtra Booms attached to the main boom and angled to achieve the required mic spacing. This arrangement proved stable and took up far less floor space than the Manfrotto tripod stand I usually use. In fact, the larger 3300 MicKing model would be ideal for recordings in public venues because of its very compact footprint and considerable reach, both vertical and horizontal.

With a few Xtra Booms added, it would be quite practical to multi-mic a large drum kit using just two MicKing stands. For example, a pair of 2200 Big Foot stands will support the overheads in the normal way, while eight XtraBoom arms, some fitted with Spin Grips, can be attached to the stand masts to support tom, snare, hat and kick mics — Spin Grips being particularly useful for reaching into the kick and under the snare. The whole array takes up far less floor space than a conventional forest of mic stands, and is more stable, more convenient and faster to rig!

The MicKing stands impress in a way that few other stands ever have. They do everything they should, simply, reliably and safely, and if you are looking for a mic stand that can handle anything and will still be working perfectly in 30 years' time, you need look no further. Very highly recommended.  

Alternatives

The most obvious and directly comparable alternative is the Starbird studio stand, but Manley Labs, who'd taken over its production, finally discontinued it after 70 years, when it became too expensive to manufacture. The Sontronics Matrix 10 (reviewed in SOS August 2010) is as strong and stable as the MicKing, but is only available with a chrome finish. The larger König & Meyer Overhead Mic Stands (models 20811 and 21411, with the 21231 boom) don't have wheels, but are very stable and have a proper counterweight system and a considerable reach.

Pros

  • Superbly engineered design.
  • Massively heavy but compact wheeled base.
  • Simple but efficient and robust clamps.
  • Sensibly heavy boom counterweight.
  • Integral 'mic hanger'.
  • Supports multiple mics via Xtra Booms.

Cons

  • Engineering of this calibre, and its sheer weight, makes it expensive.

Summary

A very well designed, easy to use, compact, yet remarkably stable, heavy-duty microphone stand. The mechanical engineering is impressive, and the stand will undoubtedly provide decades of reliable use, which goes a long way towards justifying the cost.

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Do you know your Latch Lake stands ?


Hi all,

I was looking into Latch Lake stands recently and after seeing a certain number of videos (shoutout to andersmv in particular !) and scouting any sort of informative visuals, a couple of questions came to mind :

1) Does the Spin Grip fit on a 12/18/24" Xtra boom arm ? If so, does it need a 5/8ths extender for that ?

2) Can an Xtra boom be attached to an Xtra boom ?

3) Can I fit a 2200 or 3300 Retroboom telescopic arm on the 1100BKST stand ?

4) Does the 2lbs counterweight (for the mK1100) have a female thread in it ?

5) Is there a security device for the 7lbs counterweight of the 2200 & 3300 to keep it from falling off the boom arm's end ? Or can it just slide off (and break a toe or kill a kid) if the latch is opened uncarefully...

6) Can the mK2200 & mK3300 7lbs counterweight be fitted on the mK1100 boom arm ?

7) What is the MAXIMUM amount of counterweight that can be screwed on to the mK1100 ?

8) Are the mini LL stands, seen around the 05:25 mark in the video below, produced as of yet ? (apparently called the micKing® 550)




Thank you for your time and for any light you can shed on the above.

Cheers.

I have four 2200’s, two 1100’s, and about six 24” Xtra booms. IMO, here’s the bottom line:
When the 1100 is combined with the Xtra boom(s), it becomes a system that is the perfect combination of portable, stable, flexible, durable and cost-effective.
One important fact that may not appear evident upon first glance: No hollow tubes are used. Only heavy, solid steel bars.


Last edited by Woodwindy; 26th October 2020 at 07:30 PM..

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andersmv's Avatar

Im glad you found my video helpful! Those little stands in the video look AMAZING! I know a lot of us have been begging them to do something like that for a while. I’m about to pass out, I’ll read your questions again tomorrow and get some answers to what I can on my end.

These are wonderful stands. Really the best made in many many years - unless you want a Starbird or a special Decca Tree set up.

I own several and I will see if I can answer some questions:

1) Does the Spin Grip fit on a 12/18/24" Xtra boom arm?

A: The Spin Grip Mic Mount from Latch Lake will fit on the end of the boom arm which has a mic thread at the end of it. NOTE: the Spin Grips on the 2200 and 3300 mic stands are screwed into the stand and are NOT usable on the boom arm.


2) Can an Xtra boom be attached to an Xtra boom?

A: Yes.


3) Can I fit a 2200 or 3300 Retroboom telescopic arm on the 1100BKST stand?
No. There is a special fitting on the 2200 and 3300. However, you can purchase the RB1100 or RB2200 to get this type of arm.


4) Does the 2lbs counterweight (for the mK1100) have a female thread in it ?

A: No, it has a male thread.


5) Is there a security device for the 7lbs counterweight of the 2200 & 3300 to keep it from falling off the boom arm's end ? Or can it just slide off (and break a toe or kill a kid) if the latch is opened uncarefully...

A: Just tighten it up more so there is more tension when taking it off. When latched and tightened up, it's STAYING there. It is very tough.


6) Can the mK2200 & mK3300 7lbs counterweight be fitted on the mK1100 boom arm ?

A: Yes.


7) What is the MAXIMUM amount of counterweight that can be screwed on to the mK1100 ?

A: The recommended is 7 lbs. If I needed more than that, I use the 2200. You want that heavy base the 2200 has.


8) A: I am not the manufacturer but I do not see anything like that on their website.

I hope this helps!

Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeecup77➡️


1) Does the Spin Grip fit on a 12/18/24" Xtra boom arm ? If so, does it need a 5/8ths extender for that ?

Yes. It does not need the thread extender. I'll try to attach a pic.

Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeecup77➡️


2) Can an Xtra boom be attached to an Xtra boom ?

No.

Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeecup77➡️


3) Can I fit a 2200 or 3300 Retroboom telescopic arm on the 1100BKST stand ?

Not sure. Probably not..?

The 2200 boom is longer and heavier than the 1100 boom. I expect they are engineered specifically for the best reach/balance ratio for their bases..

I've got an 1100 and a 2200 and 4x xtra booms. My "entire" room is setup around them (from a tracking perspective). The are pretty different and will naturally find different uses. The 2200 has more reach.

Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeecup77➡️



4) Does the 2lbs counterweight (for the mK1100) have a female thread in it ?

It does not.
I suspect it's intended to be used as the last of the weights in the stackable set..
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...00_weight.html


Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeecup77➡️


5) Is there a security device for the 7lbs counterweight of the 2200 & 3300 to keep it from falling off the boom arm's end ? Or can it just slide off (and break a toe or kill a kid) if the latch is opened uncarefully...

No. The latch holds very well, and takes some effort to open, but if the boom is at an incline when you open the latch be ***** careful!

It's caught me off guard once or twice, but never been a real problem. You quickly learn to respect these stands. They are shockingly heavy when you first encounter them, if you've only used bog standard stands. They are in a different category than K&M or whomever.

Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeecup77➡️




6) Can the mK2200 & mK3300 7lbs counterweight be fitted on the mK1100 boom arm ?

Yes.

Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeecup77➡️


7) What is the MAXIMUM amount of counterweight that can be screwed on to the mK1100 ?

Looks like 7lb according to that weight set link above.


..unless you're using the 2200 style weight. That's gotta be more.

I've actually got an old 20lb dumbbell sitting over 1 of the legs of each of the stands. Not actually necessary, because you should respect their limits, which are formidable, but I was trying to sit an R44 at full extension on the 1100. In the end I reconfigured, but the dumbbell stayed. I'm probably the dumbbell here.

Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeecup77➡️



8) Are the mini LL stands, seen around the 05:25 mark in the video below, produced as of yet ? (apparently called the micKing® 550)

Sexy.

Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeecup77➡️







Thank you for your time and for any light you can shed on the above.

Cheers.

Cheers


Last edited by themiracle; 26th October 2020 at 03:08 AM.. Reason: Correction!

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plainofjars's Avatar

I don’t want to derail the OP’s original set of questions, but perhaps as a quick aside: is there anything wrong with using the 2200 straight stand with the 1100 boom? I want the smaller footprint and wheels of the 2200 base, but don’t need all the extra size/reach of the 2200 boom arm. Any problems w doing this?

Also, I sure do wish they made the 1100 in chrome.

Respectfully to Miracle who took the time to nicely answer the questions

I have all these items in my studio and I have found the following. (Maybe I am misunderstanding the questions.)

2) The Xtra Boom will clamp down enough to clamp onto another Xtra Boom.

3) Can I fit a 2200 or 3300 Retroboom telescopic arm on the 1100BKST stand?
No. There is a special fitting on the 2200 and 3300. However, you can purchase the RB1100 or RB2200 to get this type of arm.

Quote:

Originally Posted by plainofjars➡️

I don’t want to derail the OP’s original set of questions, but perhaps as a quick aside: is there anything wrong with using the 2200 straight stand with the 1100 boom? I want the smaller footprint and wheels of the 2200 base, but don’t need all the extra size/reach of the 2200 boom arm. Any problems w doing this?


Absolutely.

The main benefit of the 1100 is that it a lot lighter to move around.

In addition, for the OP, consider that the 1100 does NOT come with a spin grip. This will set you back another $90. So $349 for the 1100 plus $90 for the Spin Grip for a total of $439. It's $499 for the 2200.

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plainofjars's Avatar

Quote:

Originally Posted by piano➡️

Absolutely.

The main benefit of the 1100 is that it a lot lighter to move around.

In addition, for the OP, consider that the 1100 does NOT come with a spin grip. This will set you back another $90. So $349 for the 1100 plus $90 for the Spin Grip for a total of $439. It's $499 for the 2200.

“Absolutely” it is possible to use the 2200 straight stand with the 1100 boom arm attachment? Sorry just want to make sure I understand. Thanks!

Well, no reason to answer already answered questions. But here is an extra bit of trivia:

The male threads on the Latch Lake stands, booms and spin-grips don't exactly match the male threads on the Latch Lake thread extenders. . .at least, mine don't. While the stand, boom, and spin-grip threads work fine for traditional mic holders, they didn't quite mate with the Grace Design spacebar stand adaptors. However, the male threads on the Latch Lake thread extenders do appropriately mate with the Grace Design spacebar stand adaptors.

Also, some self-described, Latch Lake experts will tell you that you only need two of the Latch Lake 1100 stands.


You need at least three,

Ray H.

Quote:

Originally Posted by piano➡️

Respectfully to Miracle who took the time to nicely answer the questions

I have all these items in my studio and I have found the following. (Maybe I am misunderstanding the questions.)

2) The Xtra Boom will clamp down enough to clamp onto another Xtra Boom.

3) Can I fit a 2200 or 3300 Retroboom telescopic arm on the 1100BKST stand?
No. There is a special fitting on the 2200 and 3300. However, you can purchase the RB1100 or RB2200 to get this type of arm.
Ah!
Thanks for the correction!

I just eyeballed mine and decided I probably wouldn’t
.. but with lighter mics and proper setup, I guess those clamps should go that tight, but the fitting looks like it might be a little wide to make full contact around the circumference of the xtraboom .. probably not a big deal.

Great stands!


Update: I tried fixing one xtra boom to another, and found it a little unstable for use in most applications. The clamp has a spring that prevents it from closing quite enough. Still not impossible but feels like a hack. These are more than flexible enough to be useful without resorting to this, but of course ymmv.


Last edited by themiracle; 5th November 2020 at 05:12 PM.. Reason: tested xtra boom mount to another xtra boom

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andersmv's Avatar

It looks like most of the questions have already been answered. I'll add: I also (wrongly) assumed when I got my 1100 that it came with the spin grip. Once you factor the added price of that into everything, the gap between the 1100 and 2200 closes a bit price wise. I'm still glad I got the 1100 as I didn't need the extra height (My ceilings are 10 ft) and I knew there would be times I needed to throw them in the car and travel with them. The 1100's are SO much more portable and fold down like a normal mic stand.

I've included some pictures. The spin grip on my stand can be attached to any other stand, it's a standard thread size. I've never tried removing the actual arm off of the body of the stand. I believe there are some allen screws helping to secure it to the stand, so I can't really take it off to be sure.

Another thing to keep in mind about the xtra-boom arms is that they can be attached to a lot of other things besides a mic stand. On drums, I attach them to the hi hat stand to get snare top and snare bottom a lot of times. If you have a bulky cymbal stand, that's another attachment point to get to toms or other weird spots. I can't tell for sure from that video of the trade show, but it looks like on the new/smaller 550 stands that they've essentially taken an xtra-boom and put threads on it for the arm part of the stand. That should be MORE than enough for any mic that's going to go on a smaller stand like that. I don't know if I could put my 10 lbs RCA PB-90 ribbon mic on and xtra-boom and fully extend it, they're not QUITE that robust. I've done it with my Vanguard V13 and Chandler TG mic though without any issues. A normal R44 style ribbon mic would probably be ok though (my PB-90 is heavier than a 44 and also has a scoring stage mount on it that adds a few lbs to it).

What are these little black things?


I just received my Latch Lake 2200 (it's so beautiful!) and inside the box was a tiny bag with 5 little black plastic... things. Can anybody explain what these are and how to use them? Or are they supposed to just be discarded?

IMGUR album with a few pics (penny for scale)

While I'm asking dumb questions — should the screw at the bottom securing the base to the main vertical piece be as tight as I can manage it, or just a "normal" amount of tightness?

Thanks so much for your time! Happy to join the community of Latch Lake owners...

Jeff Grossman
NYC classical musician (harpsichordist/conductor), amateur recording enthusiast

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jerkrecords's Avatar

Quote:

Originally Posted by high5ths➡️

I just received my Latch Lake 2200 (it's so beautiful!) and inside the box was a tiny bag with 5 little black plastic... things. Can anybody explain what these are and how to use them? Or are they supposed to just be discarded?

IMGUR album with a few pics (penny for scale)

While I'm asking dumb questions — should the screw at the bottom securing the base to the main vertical piece be as tight as I can manage it, or just a "normal" amount of tightness?

Thanks so much for your time! Happy to join the community of Latch Lake owners...

Jeff Grossman
NYC classical musician (harpsichordist/conductor), amateur recording enthusiast

hold on to those.
they are the cam offset bushings that can get worn out over time (i've actually milled my own out of plastic from the shop in a pinch!).

Don't over tighten anything. Just enough (or a hair more) to hold things in place. The beauty of the LL design is in how the cam locking mechanisms don't need to be "gorilla-ed" into place.

-pete

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerkrecords➡️

hold on to those.
they are the cam offset bushings that can get worn out over time (i've actually milled my own out of plastic from the shop in a pinch!).

Don't over tighten anything. Just enough (or a hair more) to hold things in place. The beauty of the LL design is in how the cam locking mechanisms don't need to be "gorilla-ed" into place.

-pete

Thanks! Now I see them! I'll definitely keep them. Thank you for the reply!
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Product Description

The Latch Lake MicKing 3300 has two 3-part telescoping steel poles. The upright section collapses down to 51' off the ground and extends up to ten feet. The boom arm collapses down to 45" and extends out to nearly ten feet as well, however, it has another swivel/clutch, similar to the boom pivot that controls a six inch "finger" to which you attach your mic. Altogether the stand can reach as high as 21' into the air. The entire stand is controlled by bicycle-style single-release Latch Lake Lever Locks which make make securing everything a breeze. As if that weren't enough, the swivels have built in cord clips to support your mic cables. The 3300 comes with a 29 lb. 16" base (with 90% of the weight on the outer perimeter and built in tilt-wheels) as standard. It has the same sleek 7 lb. nickel plated counterweight as the 2200.

Features:

  • Stand height: 10' extended, 51" tall collapsed
  • Boom length: 10' extended, 47" collapsed
  • Base diameter: 16"
  • Total weight: 49lbs.

 

Please note: Stock photo used. Available items are sure to be in similar condition, but may not be the exact item pictured.

Product Specifications

ConditionUsed / Vintage
Mic Stand HeightTall
Mic Stand TypeBoom

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Stands latch lake

Latch Lake Music Mic King 2200 Microphone Stand

Latch Lake Music Mic King 2200 Microphone Stand

At full extension reaches up to 14'.World's strongest Boom Clutch28 lb. base with 90% of the weight on the outer perimeter.7 lb. nickel plated adjustable, detachable counterweight. Built-in tilt wheels. Single release Latch Lake Lever Locks with built in cord clips are featured throughout all stand adjustments.

Product NameLatch Lake Music Mic King 2200 Microphone Stand
BrandLatch Lake Music
ConditionNew
MPNMICKING2200CH
UPC765366722002
Shipping OptionFree Shipping to the Continental U.S.

See also: Store, Recording, Live Sound, Studio Stands, Microphone Stands, Pro Audio Boom Stands, Live Sound Accessories, Live Sound Stands, Boom Stands, Mic Stands, By Brand, Latch Lake Music, By Category

Warning: This product can expose you to chemicals that are known to the State of California to cause cancer or birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information, go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov

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Handyman Tips \u0026 Hacks That Work Extremely Well ▶3

Latch Lake Mic Stands

Latch Lake began with a friend helping a friend. Back in 198X, guitarist Leo Kottke found that he could no longer get the French wine bottles from which he'd been making his guitar slides. It was only a matter of time until his last glass slide broke. He turned to his old friend (and former touring sound engineer) Jeff Roberts for help. Jeff's family business had extensive metalworking capabilities, and Leo wanted to explore the possibility of developing a metal slide that had the right shape and sound. One that wouldn't break on the way to the stage. Two months later, Jeff and Leo came up with a prototype that had the right shape. Two years later they found a brass alloy that, to Leo's ear ... (view more)

Latch Lake Mic Stands - Latch Lake began with a friend helping a friend. Back in 198X, guitarist Leo Kottke found that he could no longer get the French wine bottles from which he'd been making his guitar slides. It was only a matter of time until his last glass slide broke. He turned to his old friend (and former touring sound engineer) Jeff Roberts for help. Jeff's family business had extensive metalworking capabilities, and Leo wanted to explore the possibility of developing a metal slide that had the right shape and sound. One that wouldn't break on the way to the stage. Two months later, Jeff and Leo came up with a prototype that had the right shape. Two years later they found a brass alloy that, to Leo's ear actually sounded better than glass. And thus the patented AcoustaGlide guitar slide (along with Latch Lake Music Products) was born. Over the years, Latch Lake's line of guitar slides has grown. Whether you're a beginner or a living legend, click to our Slide Shop and you'll find one that's right for you. But that's just the first chapter in the Latch Lake story. In early 2002, Latch Lake will be introducing the world's best microphone stand. The one that studio recording engineers have been dreaming about for decades. More Latch Lake products will be added in the years ahead too, and each will be as quietly revolutionary as the guitar slide that started it all. (view less)

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Latch Lake Music: micKing 2200 mic stand

A few years ago, we lucked upon an old Neumann U 87. Cosmetically, it was pretty beat up, so it was only $1200. After testing it, we were exceptionally pleased with its sound. I supplied Neumann with the serial number in an effort to determine the mic's age. They certified that it was from the first year the U 87 was made! Needless to say, this mic is a lesser member of the "irreplaceable club". If something happens to it, I can't easily purchase an exact replacement. So would someone tell me why many of us plug a vintage mic into a $2000 pre amp, a $2,000 compressor, using $50 XLR cables-only to hang the mic on a $35 guitar-store mic stand? This thought came to me when I watched our Korby KAT hit the deck during a session. Our floor is industrial carpet over concrete, so you can guess who won. After calming down, I picked up the phone and called Latch Lake to request some help. The Latch Lake micKing 2200 is a smaller version of the company's flagship 3300. It has a slightly smaller base and fewer sections on the boom and main shaft. But I don't need to mic 30 ft in the air, and the reduced cost makes it easier on the pocket. The base is the best of both worlds, featuring wheels that can't move the unit unless the engineer tilts the stand (kind of like a moving dolly). Anyone who uses wheel-equipped stands can testify how often they are bumped, shoved, or slid out of place. Conversely, a stationary stand in the same league as the 2200 is a monster to move without blowing out your lower back. No thanks. But there are more features in the design. The base can nest with other micKing stands and are perimeter-weighted for added maximum stability. Since the middle of the base is off the floor, cables can be routed underneath without a problem. The main mast ends in a 5" piece of solid, hardened steel that connects to the base. It has a tapered point and fits through the base and is secured by a separate nut. Compare this design to other heavy-duty stands that attach the mast to the base via four or five rows of threads. One accidental trip or falling speaker is all it takes to strip the threads and ruin the stand. Anyone who has ice-skated can testify how hard it can be on your ankles. If this mast-to-base joint is the "ankle" of a mic stand, then the Latch Lakes are built like Olympic hockey players! Instead of using threads, locking pressure-levers control telescoping sections of the stand. They remind me of better versions of a design Tama used on drum stands. I've been abusing some of those Tama stands for 20+ years, so I'm convinced Latch Lakes are built for multiple lifetimes (not just a lifetime's) of use. The boom clutch, often the weakest link, is a continuously-adjustable, no-teeth system. It's strong enough to allow you to set it to 90 degrees and do a pull-up on it. (Actually, the pull-up demo tests the clutch on the mast, not the boom clutch-assuming anyone on the Tape Op staff could do a pull up.) The counterweight is a large chrome weight that can be adjusted or removed according to mic weight. As someone who's been nearly knocked out by walking into the weights on other stands, it's hard to miss this guy. (Somewhere Mike Fisher laughs.) My favorite part of the stand is the mini boom/mic adapter part. It rotates and tilts in any direction. This is a godsend when trying to mount a fixed-thread mic like a Blue Bottle or Shure 315-keep the mic still and spin the stand's adapter! I don't want to come off like I've never used a professional stand. We have four vintage Starbirds here in the studio. They're great for "drag and droop" mic placement. You drag the stand to its location, and let the mic droop from the ceiling. Don't try to place a mic a certain way, the Starbirds weren't designed for that. But the Latch Lakes will do whatever you configure them to. We also have some vintage Atlas stands. Again, they're better at drooping, and rolling them is a mess, and their threaded controls ceased to work smoothly around the time of the Reagan Administration. The Latch Lake 2200 has become a mainstay of our studio life. Despite receiving review units of top notch stands from several major companies, no other stand system has the build quality, reliability, flexibility, and projected lifespan of the Latch Lake. Worse, many of the competitors' offerings cost almost as much or more than the 2200. Combined with the Xtra Boom and Jam Nuts, the Latch Lake 2200 really is the best thing in stands since sliced bread. If you are at all skeptical, I challenge you to call a Latch Lake dealer and try one for 30 days. There is no way you'll send this guy back. And you'll begin to detest those inexpensive stands; they were never designed for holding your prized recording mics anyway! In life, there are some things you don't do. You don't carry a pre-war Martin in a paper bag, you don't step on Superman's cape, and you don't mount your prized vocal mic on a "prosumer" stand. ($450 MSRP; www.latchlakemusic.com)

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Sours: https://tapeop.com/reviews/gear/67/micking-2200-mic-stand/


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