5e land vehicles

5e land vehicles DEFAULT

D&D 5E Vehicles (land) versus Animal Handling

No, a horse is not a land vehicle, it's a mount ("Mounts and Vehicles").

We can start with the following balancing mechanism: SKILLS>TOOLS. Tool proficiencies and languages can be learned in downtime, but not skills. So whatever the case of overlap, the Animal Handling skill is giving more than the land vehicle tool proficiency. The second factor is that a tool proficiency gives you something that no skill does.

So, in the case of Land Vehicles, I can think of several things that the tool proficiency can do that would not be part of default Animal Handling:
* driving a covered wagon or stagecoach when being chased
* mushing a dog sled through the arctic
* harnessing a cart or a plough to unfamiliar animals
* packing a cart efficiently to get 10-25% more carrying capacity.
* performing basic repairs and maintenance of harnesses, straps, wheels, and the woodwork for wagons

Anyone can sit in a cart and get it to move (whether or not you have the tool or animal proficiency), but if you're ever needing to make a roll involving something like this, land vehicles proficiency allows you to add your proficiency bonus.

However, there are some things that would be useful for a stagecoach driver that would not be covered, and for which you'd need the animal handling skill:
* care and treatment of horses
* treating injuries
* training and breaking the animals
* getting your dogs to survive with less food in the tundra than they might normally need.
etc.

I hope this helps.

 

Sours: https://www.enworld.org/threads/vehicles-land-versus-animal-handling.385785/

Vehicles v.1

Vehicles can in all shapes and sizes, from the massive galleons that prowl through the waves to small chariots pulled by a single horse to even a balloon pulling a basket into the skies. An individual typically specializes in one of three vehicles, though they may learn additional vehicles thanks to their background or training. Those vehicle options are Air, Land, or Water vehicles.


  • Air. Many worlds may not have access to the newest forms of transportation. Airships are the newest techno-magical marvels created by ingenious tinkerers and wizards. From hot air balloons to massive ships kept afloat by captured air elementals, taking to the skies brings with it many dangers.
  • Land. Probably the most common type of vehicle, land vehicles are wagons, chariots, howdahs, and more. Those who have mastered these types of vehicles are often merchants, caravan leaders, or trained athletes.
  • Water. From ships with sails billowing in the wind to small rowboats and more, those with training in water vehicles lead a dangerous life. Drowning is the least of their worries as they know what horrors lurk beneath the surface and how the seemingly gentle waves can suddenly turn.

Controlling a Vehicle

Most of the time, there is no action or check required in order to guide a vehicle you are proficient with. When a vehicle is required to make a saving throw or ability check, and you are in control of the vehicle meaning that you are at the helm, you can add your Proficiency Bonus to the vehicle's total. If you are not at the helm, the vehicle does not gain the benefits of your experience and does not add your bonus to it's total.

In addition, while you are at the helm and in control of the vehicle, you can add your Proficiency Bonus to the vehicle's Armor Class. If a vehicle requires multiple creatures at it's helm, only one creature can add their bonus to the AC of the vehicle.

If you are at a component on the vehicle other than the Helm, you might be able to add your Proficiency Bonus to that component's Armor Class, saving throws, or ability checks, based on the DM's discretion.

Miscellaneous Skills

A wide variety of situations might rise up over the course of gameplay that may relate to your experience on a vehicle. Some of these situations could include:

  • Tying Knots.
  • Recalling information about locations you've been.
  • Recalling rumors and myths.
  • Finding possible smuggling locations.
  • Determining what a vehicle is transporting.

Dangerous Situations

In the normal process of controlling a vehicle, no check is required by the operator at the helm. There are rare circumstances where a vehicle is forced to make a saving throw or ability check or suffer damage, being destroyed or any other circumstance. Typical DCs, and examples for each type of vehicle, can be found below.

Air Vehicles
DCExamples of Danger
5Very Easy. A non-essential rope snaps.
10Easy. The rudder becomes jammed and you must work out the issue.
15Moderate. Heavy winds (20+ miles per hour) from a powerful storm are causing the vehicle to sway.
20Hard. Hurricane winds (100+ miles per hour) are tossing the vehicle around.
25Very Hard. A primordial from the Plane of Air is attempting to pull you out of the sky.
30Nearly Impossible. The vehicle has 0 hit points and is plummeting.
Land Vehicles
DCExamples of Danger
5Very Easy. A large rock on the road causes the vehicle to bounce.
10Easy. Must make a detour along a rocky hill as the road ahead is flooded.
15Moderate. Being chased by other vehicles and need to make a sudden turn.
20Hard. Going downhill at full speed with no way to stop yourself.
25Very Hard. A powerful spellcaster splits the earth open beneath the vehicle.
30Nearly Impossible. The vehicle is split in half and you are moving at terrifying speeds.
Water Vehicles
DCExamples of Danger
5Very Easy. A shark rams the side of the vehicle.
10Easy. The winds keep shifting directions.
15Moderate. Trying to find a cleverly disguised smuggling location.
20Hard. A whirlpool is pulling the vehicle in.
25Very Hard. The Kraken's tentacles are pulling the vehicle under the waves.
30Nearly Impossible. The vehicle is on fire and it's movement is 0.

Taking Damage

When a vehicle suffers damage, the amount of damage it suffers is based on the threat or the size of the object, creature, or structure that is interacting with it. See the chart below for typical damage based on the severity of the threat.

Crashing

If a vehicle crashes into a creature or object, the vehicle must immediately make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, it takes damage to its hull (for water and air vehicles) or it's frame (land vehicles) based on the size of the creature or object it crashed into.

If a creature is struck by a vehicle, it must make a Dexterity saving throw with a DC equal to 10 + the vehicle's Strength modifier, taking damage based on the vehicle's size on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful save.

If an object is struck by a vehicle, it must make a Constitution saving throw with a DC equal to 10 + the ship's Strength modifier, taking damage based on the vehicle's size on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful save. An object has an amount of hit points as determined by the DM. The chart below offers suggested hit points based on size.

Damage Chart
ThreatObject or
Vehicle Size
Bludgeoning
Damage
Typical Hit Points
for an Object
Very MinorSmall1d610
MinorMedium1d1020
ModerateLarge4d1080
SeriousHuge8d10160
DeadlyGargantuan16d10320

The DC for crashing into a creature or object may increase if the winds are pushing the vehicle to move faster, if they are made of a special material like adamantine, or other circumstances as determined by the DM.

Examples in Play

The following are examples of dangerous situations that a vehicle may be placed in. Each example specifies what type of vehicle is used in the example, though many can be adjusted to fit a different vehicle.

Dangerous Winds


  • Vehicle Type Air or Water
  • Severity Moderate
  • DC 15

Sudden powerful gusts of winds are sweeping through the air. The sails, balloons, or other fabric-based components of the vehicle are blown and tossed about. The pilot can make a DC 15 Intelligence (Vehicle) check, on a success they have enough time to order the sails drawn up or to navigate the vehicle out of harm.

On a fail, the vehicle is struck by heavy winds and the sails, balloons, or other fabric components of the vehicle suffer 22 (4d10) bludgeoning damage for every minute they are subjected to the wind. The wind lasts for 1d4 x 10 minutes. In order to put away the sails, it requires a DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check from the crew hoisting the sails. To navigate out of the wind, it requires a DC 15 Dexterity (Vehicle) check to safely navigate the winds and move out of their path. The check can be made once per minute.

Leaks


  • Vehicle Type Air or Water
  • Severity Minor
  • DC 10

A leak has formed on the hull or balloon of the vehicle. In order to be seen, the pilot can make a DC 10 Wisdom (Vehicle) check, on a success they notice the leak either by walking the ship and noticing it, or the crew has successfully seen it.

While the leak is there, the vehicle either starts taking on water or it begins descending from the sky. For every hour that the leak is present, the vehicle begins sinking 1d10 feet. In order to repair the leak, a creature must repair it with a DC 10 ability check using an appropriate tool, like Carpenter's Tools or Woodcarver's Tools (for wood), or Leathework's Tools or Weaver's Tools (for cloth). If those tools are not available, the pilot can attempt a DC 10 Intelligence (Vehicles) check to staunch the leak until it can be taken into port and fixed. The ship will be unable to ascend higher than it currently is at. A creature can attempt the check once per hour.

Broken Movement


  • Vehicle Type Air, Land, Water
  • Severity Serious
  • DC 20

The helm of the vehicle has stopped functioning and the pilot is immediately aware of it. The danger is not the helm malfunctioning but the danger that the vehicle is now in. The pilot can make a DC 20 Intelligence or Wisdom (Vehicles) check to realize that they are about to crash into a huge object. This object could be a mountain top, a floating mote of earth, an underwater rock, a massive pothole in the road filled with water, or a huge creature.

The vehicle will crash into the object in a matter of seconds and the pilot must make a DC 20 Intelligence (Vehicles) check in order to realize the problem and fix it. This could be the chain has jumped off it's tracks on a ship, the horses are not listening to your commands, the elemental powering the airship is weakening, or something else that is affecting the ship. On a failed check, the vehicle crashes into the huge object and must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw or the hull or frame takes 8d10 bludgeoning damage.

Vehicle Components

All vehicles share the same types of components and are used for the same basic purposes. A component represents many different things but are for a singular purpose.


  • Hull/Frame. A hull (Air/Water) or frame (Land) is the basic form of the vehicle and is what supports all other components. If the hull/frame is ever reduced to 0 hit points, the vehicle is destroyed.
  • Control. How the vehicle is controlled, this is where the helm is located.
  • Movement. How the vehicle moves, the helm controls this component. If this is destroyed, the vehicle's speed is reduced to 0 unless it is what is holding the vehicle aloft. In which case, the vehicle begins falling towards the ground.
  • Weapon. The combat capability of a vehicle, not all vehicles carry weapons.

A vehicle might have special components not listed here, if so it will be described in the vehicle's stat block.

Example Vehicles

The following are a few examples of different vehicles, more vehicles can be found in the Baldur's Gate: Descent into Avernus (2019) by Wizards of the Coast, Ghosts of Saltmarsh (2019) by Wizards of the Coast, or Unearthed Arcana - Of Ships and Seas (2018) by Wizards of the Coast.

Creating Your Own Vehicle

When creating your own vehicle, there are few things to keep in mind. Land vehicles will often rely on beasts of burdens in order to move them, in which case the Armor Class, Hit Points, and speed of those components will be determined by that beast as well as if it has any barding. A land vehicle relying on a beast can only travel for 8 hours a day, attempting to push the beast to travel for longer may require a Constitution saving throw or become exhausted per the DM's discretion.

In addition, to determine how many hit points the hull or frame has, refer to the chart below:

Constitution
Modifier
Hit PointsDamage Threshold
+050-
+110010
+220010
+330015
+440015
+550020

If you wish to remove the vehicle's damage threshold, increase it's hit points by 200.


Cart


  • Large vehicle (10 ft. x 15 ft.)
  • Creature Capacity 1 crew, 5 passengers
  • Cargo Capacity .5 tons
  • Travel Pace 3 miles per hour (24 miles per day)

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
12 (+1)7 (-2)10 (+0)000

  • Damage Immunities poison, psychic
  • Condition Immunities blinded, charmed, deafened, exhaustion, frightened, incapacitated, paralyzed, petrified, poisoned, prone, stunned, unconscious

Actions

On its turn, the cart can take the move action below. It can't take this action if it has no crew.

Move. The cart can use its helm (reigns) to move with its horse.

Frame

Armor Class 8
Hit Points 100 (damage threshold 10)

Control: Helm (Reigns)

Armor Class 15
Hit Points 20
Movement Move up to the speed of the vehicle's horse, with one 90-degree turn. If the helm is destroyed the cart can't turn.

Movement: Draft Horse

Armor Class 10
Hit Points 19
Speed (land) 40 ft. (requires at least 1 crew)

Movement: Wheels (2)

Armor Class 15
Hit Points 20; -5 ft. to speed per 5 damage taken
Speed (land) see Movement: Draft Horse

Features

A cart has the following features:


  • Frame. The vehicle has a open, wooden frame that can carry heavy creates.
  • Helm. The vehicle uses reigns for its helm, and they must be used to move the cart.

Cart Storage

The storage of the vehicle has the following features:


  • Railing. The cart has a 2-foot-high rail covered in wood around its perimeter that provides half cover for Medium creatures and three-quarters cover for Small creatures behind it.

Hot Air Balloon


  • Huge vehicle (15 ft. x 15 ft.)
  • Creature Capacity 1 crew, 9 passengers
  • Cargo Capacity .5 tons
  • Travel Pace 5 miles per hour (120 miles per day), only with the wind

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
12 (+1)10 (+0)10 (+0)000

  • Damage Immunities poison, psychic
  • Condition Immunities blinded, charmed, deafened, exhaustion, frightened, incapacitated, paralyzed, petrified, poisoned, prone, stunned, unconscious

Actions

On its turn, the vehicle can take the move action below. It can't take this action if it has no crew.

Move. The vehicle can use its helm to move with its balloon.

Hull: Basket

Armor Class 15
Hit Points 100 (damage threshold 5); if reduced to 0 hit points, all occupants and supplies plummet to the ground unless they hang on to the ropes connected to the balloon.

Control: Helm

Armor Class 15
Hit Points 50
Movement Move up to the speed of the vehicle's movement component. If the helm is destroyed, the vehicle can't ascend.

Movement: Balloon

Armor Class 12
Hit Points 100; -5 ft. speed per 25 damage taken; if reduced to 0 hit points, the vehicle plummets to the ground.
Speed (hover) 20 ft. ascend or descend; the wind controls where it goes

Features

A hot air balloon has the following features:


  • Balloon. The vehicle has a balloon that is 50 feet wide and 70 feet tall.
  • Helm. The vehicles uses a burner for its helm, and must have fuel to power the flame or it can not rise and begins to descend.
  • Rigging. Rigging on the vehicle can be climbed without an ability check.

Hot Air Balloon Basket

The basket of the vehicle has the following features:


  • Sand Bags. Twelve sandbags line the hot air balloon, one sand bag can be dropped from the balloon as an action which causes the hot air balloon to immediately rise 20 feet.
  • Railing. The deck has a 3-foot-high rail covered in wood around its perimeter that provides half cover for Medium creatures and three-quarters cover for Small creatures behind it.


Hulk


  • Gargantuan vehicle (80 ft. by 25 ft.)
  • Creature Capacity 40 crew, 30 passengers
  • Cargo Capacity 175 tons
  • Travel Pace 4 miles per hour (96 miles per day)

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
20 (+5)5 (-3)20 (+5)000

  • Damage Immunities poison, psychic
  • Condition Immunities blinded, charmed, deafened, exhaustion, frightened, incapacitated, paralyzed, petrified, poisoned, prone, stunned, unconscious

Actions

On its turn, the hulk can take 3 actions, choosing from the options below. It can take only 2 actions if it has fewer than twenty crew and only 1 action if it has fewer than ten. It can't take these actions if it has fewer than three crew.

Fire Ballistas. The hulk can fire its ballistas. DMG, ch. 8

Move. The hulk can use its helm to move with its oars or sails. As part of this move, it can use its naval ram.

Hull

Armor Class 15
Hit Points 500 (damage threshold 20)

Control: Helm

Armor Class 18
Hit Points 50
Movement Move up to the speed of one of the ship's movement components, with one 90-degree turn. If the helm is destroyed, the hulk can't turn.

Movement: Oars

Armor Class 12
Hit Points 100; -5 ft. speed per 25 damage taken
Speed (water) 20 ft. (requires at least 20 crew)

Movement: Sails

Armor Class 12
Hit Points 100; -10 ft. speed per 25 damage taken
Speed (water) 35 ft.; 15 ft. while sailing into the wind; 50 ft. while sailing with the wind

Weapon: Ballista (2)

Armor Class 15
Hit Points 50 each
Ranged Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, range 120/480 ft., one target. Hit: 16 (3d10) piercing damage.

Weapon: Naval Ram

Armor Class 20
Hit Points 100 (damage threshold 10)
The hulk has advantage on all saving throws relating to crashing when it crashes into a creature or an object. Any damage it takes from the crash is applied to the naval ram rather than to the ship. These benefits don't apply if another vessel crashes into the hulk.


Features

A hulk has the following features:


  • Ceilings. The ceilings in the lower decks are 8 feet high.
  • Flat-Bottomed. The hulk has a flat bottom and can sail in as little as 3 feet of shallow water, provided it has no cargo. This ship is not designed for the open sea but rather rivers.
  • Light. Hanging lanterns cast bright light throughout the ship.
  • Rigging. Rigging on the ship can be climbed without an ability check.
  • Sails. The hulk has two 20-foot-tall masts with sails.

Hulk Deck

The decks of the hulk have the following features:


  • Ballista. A ballista is mounted on the fore and stern. Ten ballista arrows are stacked and secured nearby each one.
  • Decks. A cog has three decks, the main deck, and two holds for cargo and sleeping quarters.
  • Oars. Twenty benches are built into the deck of the lower deck, each with a 20-foot-long oar. When the ship is rowed, crew members sit on these benches to work the oars. Ten spare oars hang on the walls of the ship.
  • Railing. The deck has a 3-foot-high rail around its perimeter that provides half cover for Medium creatures and three-quarters cover for Small creatures behind it.
Sours: https://www.gmbinder.com/share/-MEtITenZy9gkoIcZa5T
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My D&D 5e Homebrew uses lots of Mounts and Vehicles (includes horse drawn wagon, naval warships, hover craft, and personal battlesuits).

While my current party has yet to use Vehicles, it is bound to happen.

For Mounts, PHB suggests using Animal Handling. However, I have been unable to determine a current skill that allows for Handling or Operation of Vehicles.

Which Ability would be the most appropriate to use for Vehicle Handling and/or Operation?

What skill would you use for Vehicle Handling and/or Operation?

Would it make sense to add a "Vehicle Handling" skill to cover Vehicle Operation?

\$\endgroup\$Sours: https://rpg.stackexchange.com/questions/96161/what-skill-would-use-cover-vehicle-handling-or-operation

D&D 5th Edition

A good mount can help you move more quickly through the Wilderness, but its primary Purposeis to carry the gear that would otherwise slow you down. The Mountsand Other Animalstable shows each animal’s speed and base carrying Capacity.

An animal pulling a carriage, cart, chariot, sled, or wagon can move weight up to five times its base carrying Capacity, including the weight of the vehicle. If multiple animals pull the same vehicle, they can add their carrying Capacitytogether.

Mountsother than those listed here are available in fantasy gaming worlds, but they are rare and not normally available for purchase. These include flying Mounts(pegasi, griffons, hippogriffs, and similar animals) and even aquatic Mounts(giant sea horses, for example). Acquiring such a mount often means securing an egg and raising the creature yourself, making a bargain with a powerful entity, or negotiating with the mount itself.

Barding: Bardingis armor designed to protect an animal’s head, neck, chest, and body. Any type of armor shown on the Armortable can be purchased as Barding. The cost is four times the equivalent armor made for Humanoids, and it weighs twice as much.
Saddles: A Militarysaddle braces the rider, helping you keep your seat on an active mount in battle. It gives you advantage on any check you make to remain mounted. An exotic saddle is required for riding any aquatic or flying mount.

Vehicle Proficiency: If you have proficiency with a certain kind of vehicle (land or water), you can add your Proficiency Bonusto any check you make to control that kind of vehicle in difficult circumstances.

Rowed Vessels: Keelboats and rowboats are used on lakes and rivers. If going downstream, add the speed of the current (typically 3 miles per hour) to the speed of the vehicle. These vehicles can’t be rowed against any significant current, but they can be pulled upstream by draft animals on the shores. A Rowboatweighs 100 pounds, in case Adventurerscarry it over land.

ItemCostWeight
Barding×4×2
Bit and bridle2 gp1 lb.
Carriage100 gp600 lb.
Cart15 gp200 lb.
Chariot250 gp100 lb.
Animal Feed (per day)5 cp10 lb.
Saddle, Exotic60 gp40 lb.
Saddle, Military20 gp30 lb.
Saddle, Pack5 gp15 lb.
Saddle, Riding10 gp25 lb.
Saddlebags4 gp8 lb.
Sled20 gp300 lb.
Stabling (per day)5 sp
Wagon35 gp400 lb.

Sours: https://roll20.net/compendium/dnd5e/Mounts%20and%20Vehicles

Land vehicles 5e

DnD 5e – How to Play 5.7 – Mounts and Vehicles

Last Updated: September 26, 2021

If you choose to acquire a mount, whether something as mundane as a horse or as fantastic as a pegasus, you’ll want to know a few things about how they work outside of combat. Similarly, if you have a vehicle like a cart or a ship, you’ll need to know a few things. If you don’t plan on doing either, skip this section and come back later.

The full stats for mounts, vehicles, and related items are presented on several tables on page 157 of the Player’s Handbook.

Barding

Barding is armor for your mount. It costs 4 times as much as normal and weighs twice as much as armor for a humanoid. Still, mounts are notably easy to kill because they don’t get tougher as your enemies become more deadly, so investing in some armor is wise, especially if your mount is difficult to replace.

Your mount doesn’t need to worry about armor proficiency. Jeremy Crawford, the Senior Game Designer on 5th edition Dungeons and Dragons, explained that The rule on monsters and armor is purposefully generous. So as long as your DM is comfortable with your pony wearing plate, you’re good to go.

Saddles

Saddles come in several types, but generally if you plan to do any fighting you want a military saddle. Military saddles give you Advantage on any check to remain mounted. Those aren’t common, but they do happen. Generally you make saving throws instead.

You need an exotic saddle for aquatic and flying mounts, which won’t provide the benefits of a military saddle, which isn’t great because being knocked off of a flying mount typically hurts more than falling off a horse.

Vehicle Proficiency

If you have proficiency with a certain kind of vehic1e (land or water), you can add your proticiency bonus to any check you make to control that kind of vehicle in difficult circumstances.

Rowed Vessels

Keelboats and rowboats are used on lakes and rivers. If going downstream, add the speed of the current (typically 3 miles per hour) to the speed of the vehicle. These vehicles can’t be rowed against any significant current, but they can be pulled upstream by draft animals on the shores.

A rowboat weighs 100 pounds, in case adventurers carry it over land.

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Sours: https://rpgbot.net/dnd5/how-to-play/mounts-and-vehicles/
Means Of Transport For Children - Land, water and air transport for kids

Xanathar’s Guide to Everything

Well, well, well you big floating eyeball that is supposed to by funny in the margins of the book but ends up just being annoying. Let’s see what you got to say about this proficiency! On page 82 of Xanather’s Guide to Everything, it has this to say about vehicles:

Land and Water Vehicles

Proficiency with land vehicles covers a wide range of options, from chariots and howdahs to wagons and carts. Proficiency with water vehicles covers anything that navigates waterways. Proficiency with vehicles grants the knowledge needed to handle vehicles of that type, along with knowledge of how to repair and maintain them.

In addition, a character proficient with water vehicles is knowledgeable about anything a professional sailor would be familiar with, such as information about the sea and islands, tying knots, and assessing weather and sea conditions.

Arcana. When you study a magic vehicle, this tool proficiency aids you in uncovering lore or determining how the vehicle operates.
InvestigationPerception. When you inspect a vehicle for clues or hidden information, your proficiency aids you in noticing things that others might miss.
Vehicle Handling. When piloting a vehicle, you can apply your proficiency bonus to the vehicle’s AC and saving throws.

Alright, I’ll be the bigger beholder here, uh, I mean man. This isn’t the worst tool in Xanathar’s and in fact, it is probably their better version of it. Of course, it heavily favors water vehicles making them OP (please nerf). Carriage drivers are just as likely to know about tying knots seeing as how they have to secure cargo, tie up the horses, and more. Well, maybe not just as likely, but you get my point. It’s mean to land vehicles and I won’t stand for it.

Anyway, getting back to the point of this. It’s actually fine and fairly useful. I like that you can add your proficiency bonus to the Vehicle’s AC and saving throws, as that is a great boon for whoever has this proficiency.

But before we get too carried away with the floating orb and his goldfish, let’s look at what they miss. This is going to bring it to my proficiency for Vehicles.

Vehicles

I start this off with the basics about what are vehicles and what are covered when it comes to vehicles. I also include the missing vehicle that they refuse to mention, and that’s airships. Yes, I know not every campaign has airships because the technology isn’t there, but I’d like to point out that plate armor and rapiers are existing in a world where people think studded leather is actually a thing, so I think I win.

Just because not every campaign will feature airships doesn’t mean we can’t at least be inclusive and throw them a bone. They are often mistreated, plus an official WotC setting has airships in it… its Eberron… and Forgotten Realms… and probably Greyhawk seeing as how it had a UFO on some sort of mountain… spoilers. So, there is no reason why airships were forgotten except that Xanathar hates the idea that people can fly.

Back to the tool.

I start out clarifying that the majority of the time, a creature who is proficient with the vehicle they are controlling does not require an action. Also, I totally steal WotC’s idea of adding proficiency bonus to AC and Saving Throws AND! I include ability checks because some spells require checks and not just saving throws - and who knows what else a ship may have to roll. I’m just being thorough and inclusive to the unloved ability check. Of course this doesn’t go to their attack roll because attack rolls are determined by your proficiency bonus anyway.

I then offer a few miscellaneous ideas as to what else you can use this proficiency for, trying to squeeze every drop of use out of this proficiency as I can.

And then we get into the real information that WotC didn’t provide in their book.

Dangerous Situations

OK, not 100% true as they have a DC 10 activity of “Navigate Rough Terrain or Waters” which is. Well, not that helpful when it comes to figuring out things. Instead, I provide three different charts basically going over the same thing for each type of vehicle. The charts first show off the basic DCs of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, & 30 that represent the difficulty levels of Very Easy, Easy, Moderate, Hard, Very Hard, & Nearly Impossible respectively.

Along with each of those DCs, I offer an brief example as to what activity might be required at each DC. I’m going to be honest, the hardest one for me to think of for each one is a DC 5 check because… those checks just kind of feel a bit pointless seeing as how the risk of failure is so low to begin with. Those feel more like flavor activity than actual game mechanics, but for some odd reason, I feel like I remember there being a DC 5 trap or ability check in one of the official adventures. Sadly, I can’t remember which one it might’ve been for me to reference.

After those three reference charts, we then jump over to taking damage and what type of damage a DM can expect to throw at a vehicle and watch as it falls apart. This chart is somewhat lifted from the UA - Of Ships and Seas and the adventure book Ghosts of Saltmarsh, though I add in additional information to help a DM out which is Threat Severity and Typical Hit Points of an Object.

This information is simply to help out when it comes to our next portion of the proficiency…

DANGER!

Three dangerous situations for a DM to use and to gain inspiration for what could happen on a boat and make the one character with a proficiency in vehicles feel useful. Everyone talks a big talk about being able to steer the boat, but only one person has the proficiency for it. And once everything starts going to shit, everyone will be pointing at the single dude with proficiency and demanding what’s wrong. It’s not easy being useful.

After the dangerous situations, we move on to the last part of this proficiency.

Example Stat Blocks

Just three stat blocks to add to the other stat blocks put out by WotC in Baldur's Gate: Descent into AvernusGhosts of Saltmarsh, and Unearthed Arcana - Of Ships and Seas. My three little stat blocks are a cart, a hot air balloon and the hulk (no, not the angry one). Our patreons might recongize two of those as I recently did several vehicle stat blocks for our Monster Thursday (every other week I release a Monster-Manual-esque monster section with 5 to 7 stat blocks and full lore, if you want an example of one of these check out our Patreon).

And that’s the end of this proficiency and the end of the official tools put out by WotC! I have a few more tools I’ve been thinking up, and I’m going back through all of the older tools and giving them updates, adding in new variant rules, new recipes, and more! Plus, keep an eye on our new Dump Stat store where you can buy this tool and all the other tools for just $.50 for a Printer-Friendly version… or become a patron for a buck and get everything then.

Sours: https://dumpstatadventures.com/the-gm-is-always-right/making-tools-useful-in-5e-vehicles

Now discussing:

In our time, anal relationships often begin in adolescence in boys with a modest nature. Friendly boys start with joint masturbation, mutual masturbation, discussing the possibility of anal sex and first tryouts with each other. By the age of 16-17, they determine their credo, wagon, asset or liability.



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