Hopkins course catalog

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Course Directory

Please Note

For the 1st and 2nd terms, the School is expecting to primarily offer onsite courses (section .01) and traditional online courses (.81). According to the Johns Hopkins University Guidance, onsite courses in the 1st term with expected enrollment above 50 will primarily be taught virtually (i.e., synchronously online, typically via Zoom). The University approved an increase in the enrollment limit for the 2nd term so that onsite courses in the 2nd term with expected enrollment above 70 will be taught virtually. These virtual courses will have a section number of .71.

In both 1st and 2nd terms, some onsite courses, however, will be taught in a hybrid modality – both onsite and remote concurrently at the same time. These hybrid courses will be identified by the two section numbers for the same course – .01 for the onsite and .41 for the remote online. To account for limited classroom capacity and technology setup for remote teaching, students must register for the appropriate section (either .01 or .41). In CoursePlus, students in the remote section .41 will be merged into the onsite section (.01).

All 1st term course sections are currently open for registration.

2nd term registration will be temporarily closed for all sections between August 19 and August 25 to allow for processing updates to course offerings. We expect all sections, including sections .01 and .41 will be open for registration on August 25, 2021.

Given fluctuations in enrollment numbers and room availability, course modality may be changed prior to the beginning of the terms. Students are advised to review course modality prior to the start of the term. Add period extends one week into the term; drop period extends 2 weeks into the term.

Last modified August 19, 2021

Sours: https://www.jhsph.edu/courses/

Course Directory

Please Note

For the 1st and 2nd terms, the School is expecting to primarily offer onsite courses (section .01) and traditional online courses (.81). According to the Johns Hopkins University Guidance, onsite courses in the 1st term with expected enrollment above 50 will primarily be taught virtually (i.e., synchronously online, typically via Zoom). The University approved an increase in the enrollment limit for the 2nd term so that onsite courses in the 2nd term with expected enrollment above 70 will be taught virtually. These virtual courses will have a section number of .71.

In both 1st and 2nd terms, some onsite courses, however, will be taught in a hybrid modality – both onsite and remote concurrently at the same time. These hybrid courses will be identified by the two section numbers for the same course – .01 for the onsite and .41 for the remote online. To account for limited classroom capacity and technology setup for remote teaching, students must register for the appropriate section (either .01 or .41). In CoursePlus, students in the remote section .41 will be merged into the onsite section (.01).

All 1st term course sections are currently open for registration.

2nd term registration will be temporarily closed for all sections between August 19 and August 25 to allow for processing updates to course offerings. We expect all sections, including sections .01 and .41 will be open for registration on August 25, 2021.

Given fluctuations in enrollment numbers and room availability, course modality may be changed prior to the beginning of the terms. Students are advised to review course modality prior to the start of the term. Add period extends one week into the term; drop period extends 2 weeks into the term.

Last modified August 19, 2021

Sours: https://www.jhsph.edu/courses/list/
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The instructor: Mark Waddell, graduate student in the Department of the History of Science and Technology.

Meeting time : 10:30 to 11:50 a.m., Thursdays and Fridays.

Syllabus: For more than 2,000 years, humans have believed that supernatural beings could manipulate nature with miraculous ease. This course examines, through careful reading of works devoted to science, philosophy and theology, humanity's changing conceptions of these supernatural figures' presence in the world.

Coursework: This class demands active participation, and 25 percent of a student's final grade depends on that. Students also are required to write three papers. There are no exams.

Required Reading : Inferno, by Dante Alighieri; Doctor Faustus, by Christopher Marlowe; and The Crucible, by Arthur Miller.

Students also read selections from:Acts or Disputation Against Fortunatus the Manichean, by St. Augustine of Hippo; Treatise on the Angels and The Cause of Sin, as regards the Devil, from Summa theologica, by St. Thomas Aquinas; The Cathars: Dualist Heretics in Languedoc in the High Middle Ages, by Malcolm Barber; The Book of John the Evangelist, Cathar Gospel; On the Accusations Against the Albigensians, by Raynaldus; The Trial of Jeanne d'Arc by W.P Barrett; The Malleus maleficarum; Demon Lovers: Witchcraft, Sex and the Crisis of Belief, by Walter Stephens; A Discourse on the Subtill Practices of Devilles by Witches and Sorcerers, by G. Gyfford; The Divel's Delusions, by B. Misodaimon; The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe, by Brian Levack; Signes and Wonders from Heaven; A true and faithful relation of what passed for many years between Dr. John Dee ... and some spirits; Symbiosis, or The Ultimate Converse of Pope and Devil attended by a Cardinal and Buffoon, by James Selgado; and more.

Films viewed in class:The Messenger; The Crucible and The Ninth Gate.

Overheard in class: "A lot of concerns were brought up by the scientific notions of how things actually worked in the 1660s. They wrestled with the question of whether the devil existed or not. Some people believed that there were evil happenings and that they were real. Others did not so much argue that these things did not exist as that a scientific revolution was going on and that there could be less belief without proof. That meant, to some, that if witchcraft did not exist, then there was no need for God."
—Mark Waddell

Students say: "Being Jewish, I never had to deal with the concept of the Devil as anything more than a figure like the bogeyman (Judaism has no real analog to Satan). So far this semester, I have been nothing but enthralled by the course, due to the captivating readings, engaging discussions and an impassioned and intelligent teacher. Mr. Waddell's enthusiasm is contagious and definitely drives the students. Overall, I would say that this course is one of the most interesting and thought-provoking humanities courses I have ever taken."
— Daniel Lamphier, 21, senior biology major from Middlefield, Conn.

Members of the media interested in writing about this class should contact Lisa De Nike at 443-287-9906. Color photographs of Mark Waddell also are available upon request.


Johns Hopkins University news releases can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.jhu.edu/news_info/news/
   Information on automatic e-mail delivery of science and medical news releases is available at the same address.

Go to [email protected] Page
Sours: https://pages.jh.edu/news_info/news/home05/apr05/course.html

Curriculum

In 1660, Edward Hopkins, the second governor of the Connecticut Colony, established our nation’s first charitable trust to found Hopkins Grammar School on the New Haven Green. The School began with a dedication to the “breeding up of hopeful youths... for the public service of the country in future times.” More than three centuries later, Hopkins School continues to fulfill its original mission, and “hopeful”—connoting both the promise and the expectation of future good—remains the word that defines our educational approach and animates our aspirations.

 

Today, Hopkins is a traditional, independent, gender-inclusive day school of 700+ students in grades seven through twelve. Located on a 108-acre campus overlooking New Haven, the School takes pride in its distinguished faculty and dedicated staff. We define ourselves as a community of civility and learning, one that educates students from diverse backgrounds to a full measure of their talents and humanity. Together, we seek to: 

  • develop in our young people the habits of mind of scholars as the foundation for a lifelong love of learning;
  • foster the courage to live and think as distinct individuals who embrace their responsibilities in the larger world;
  • expose every student to the deep satisfaction that derives from service to others;
  • enlarge the educational experience to include the creative joy and aesthetic sensibility of the artist, and the vitality and competitive spirit of the athlete;
  • provide, through the School’s advisers, the wisdom and goodwill necessary to guide our young people to confident self-reliance; and,
  • nurture the development of character essential to leading a rich and purposeful life.
Sours: https://www.hopkins.edu/academics/curriculum

Catalog hopkins course

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