Days function google sheets

Days function google sheets DEFAULT

How to calculate differences between dates in Google Sheets

More advanced day-counting functions in Google Sheets

The above options were the more basic ways you could calculate between days. The following options are more advanced, however, they leave you with more flexibility in your calculations.

In our example, the projects start and end on specific dates. But, team members will only work on the project on their work days, i.e. weekdays. Let’s take a look at these more advanced options to help us account for these variables.

Option 3: Use the NETWORKDAYS function

NETWORKDAYS is a very handy formula to subtract dates within Google Sheets whilst only counting weekdays. This formula stands for Net Working Days, thus excluding the weekends from its calculations.

Moreover, you can customize NETWORKDAYS to calculate non-standard working weeks (i.e. not Monday through Friday) or even to exclude public holidays. If you would like to learn more about this, check out our Guide to using the NETWORKDAYS function.

For this example, we will use the most simple syntax for NETWORKDAYS:

Sours: https://blog.sheetgo.com/google-sheets-features/calculate-the-differences-between-dates-in-google-sheets/

How to Calculate Days Between Two Dates in Google Sheets

Working with date and time has become easy in Google Sheets thanks to some formulas.

You can easily calculate the number of days between two dates by simply subtracting the dates (in case you need all the days), or use formulas to find out working days or non-working days.

In this tutorial, I will cover various scenarios where you can calculate days between two dates in Google Sheets

One thing you should know about dates is that these are just numbers that have been formatted to look like dates. Since these are numbers, you can perform operations such as addition and subtraction with dates.

Let’s get started!

Calculating Total Days Between two dates

Suppose you have the start date and the end date of a project (as shown below) and you want to quickly know the total number of days between these two dates.

Dataset for calculating total number of days between two dates

Since dates are nothing but numbers, you can easily get this by subtraction the start date from the end date.

The below formula will give you the total number of days between these two dates.

=B2-B1

The above formula tells us that there are 274 days between the project start and end date.

Subtract Dates to get number of days in between

Easy right!

There is one thing you need to know when subtracting dates. The number of days given in the above example is exclusive of the start date. In case you want to include the start date in the result, you need to add 1 to the resulting data.

To get the number of days that include project start and end date both, use the below formula:

=B2-B1+1

Calculate Workdays between two dates

While it’s nice and easy to get the total number of days between two dates, in most cases, you just don’t need the total days but the workdays.

And in case, I am assuming working days to be Monday to Friday. In case the working days are different, you will need to change the formula (covered later in this tutorial).

After all, if it’s a project, you can’t expect your team to be working on weekends.. right!

Calculating the number of working days between two dates is not as straightforward as subtracting the values, but it’s not too hard (as Google Sheets has a formula for it).

Suppose you have the dataset as shown below and you want to calculate the number of working days between these two dates

Dataset for calculating total number of days between two dates

The below formula will give you the number of working days between these two dates:

=NETWORKDAYS(B1,B2)

Net working days between two dates

The NETWORKDAYS function (as the name suggests), gives you the networking days in between two dates (it takes start date and end date as the input arguments)

There are two things you need to know about the NETWORKDAYS function:

  • It includes both the start and end date when calculating the number of working days
  • It considers Saturday and Sunday as the weekend days. So it counts all the days that are from Mon-Friday.

While this may work well in most of the cases, there are two common scenarios where you may want to tweak this formula:

  1. You need to exclude public holidays from the working days
  2. Your weekends are different. For example, you may only get Sunday as the weekend and Saturday is working day for you. Or you are from countries where weekend days are Friday and Saturday (and not Saturday and Sunday)

The good news is, Google Sheets can handle all this easily.

Calculate Workdays While Excluding Public Holidays

For this to work, you need to have a list of holidays that you want to exclude.

In most companies, they provide a holiday calendar that you can use. Or if you’re a freelancer or small business, you can create this yourself too.

Below is an example of a holiday calendar that I have for 2020.

Holiday Calendar

Now when I am calculating the number of working days between two dates in Google Sheets, I don’t want to count the days that are holidays.

Thankfully, NETWORKDAYS function already has this feature built in. You can specify the range that has the holidays and it will automatically ignore these while calculating the workdays.

Suppose you have a dataset as shown below:

Dataset for calculating total number of days between two dates

The below formula will give you the number of working days between the start and end date while not counting the holidays:

=NETWORKDAYS(B1,B2,E2:E12)

Calculating working days with public holidays accounted for

This formula takes three arguments:

  • Start Date – B1 in this example
  • End Date – B2 in this example
  • The range that has the holiday dates – E2:E12 in this example

Note that NETWORKDAYS function is smart enough to adjust the holidays and weekends by itself. For example, in the below holiday dates, there are eight holidays between 1st April and 30th December.

But NETWORKDAYS function only considers six of these and two are on weekend days anyway (Easter and Independence Day). Since the NETWORKDAYS formula anyway disregard weekend days when doing the calculation, it will also make sure it doesn’t remove the days twice (when it’s a weekend as well as a holiday)

Calculate Workdays When Weekends are Not Sat and Sun

While NETWORKDAYS function automatically assumes weekend days to be Sat and Sun, this may not be the case for all.

Some of you may only have a Sunday off and some may work in countries where Friday and Saturday are off and Sunday is working.

To adjust these variations, there is another function in Google Sheets that you can use.

NETWORKDAYS.INTL – where INTL stands for international.

When you use the NETWORKDAYS.INTL function, apart from the start date, end date and the holidays, it also allows you to specify the weekend, where the weekend could be any one day of the week or any two consecutive days of the week,

So let’s say you have the below example and you want to calculate the number of working days when the weekend days are Friday and Saturday.

Dataset for calculating total number of days between two dates

The below formula will give you the result:

=NETWORKDAYS.INTL(B1,B2,7,E2:E12)

Calculate workdays between two days when wekend days are Friday and Saturday

The above formula would return 191, which is the number of days between start and end dates, with Friday and Saturday as weekend days.

This formula takes four arguments:

  • Start Date – B1 in this example
  • End Date – B2 in this example
  • Weekend – 7 in this example. This is where you specify the weekend days you want this formula to consider. Why 7, check out the table below.
  • The range that has the holiday dates – E2:E12 in this example

Why did I use 7 to make Friday and Saturday as Weekend Day?

This is how this formula has been coded. There are these numbers that specify weekend days and are pre-coded in the formula.

So when I use 7, it knows that I want the weekend days to be Friday and Saturday.

Below is a table that shows all the numbers you can use and what they mean:

ArgumentWeekend Days
1Saturday/Sunday are weekend days
2Sunday/Monday are weekend days
3Monday/Tuesday are weekend days
4Tuesday/Wednesday are weekend days
5Wednesday/Thursday are weekend days
6Thursday/Friday are weekend days
7Friday/Saturday are weekend days
11Sunday is the only weekend day
12Monday is the only weekend day
13Tuesday is the only weekend day
14Wednesday is the only weekend day
15Thursday is the only weekend day
16Friday is the only weekend day
17Saturday is the only weekend day

Based on the above table, if you only want Sunday to be considered as the weekend (with a six-day working week), you need to use 11 as the third arguments in the NETWORKDAYS.INTL function.

Calculate Workdays with Non-consecutive Off Days

Suppose you are in a job where you only work on specific days of the week (let’s say Monday, Tuesday and Thursday).

With such an arrangement, it becomes even more difficult to count the number of working days between two given dates.

Thankfully, when the NETWORKDAYS.INTL function was being formulated, this was also taken into account.

When you’re using the NETWORKDAYS.INTL function for something such as this, you need to clearly specify which days are working and which are not.

And you do that by using a series of seven consecutive numbers (where each number is either 1 or 0). These numbers represent the seven days of a week. The first number of the series represents a Monday, second represents a Tuesday and so on.

‘0’ means that it’s a working day and ‘1’ means that it’s a non-working day. So 0000011 would mean that first five days (Monday to Friday) are working and Saturday and Sunday are weekend days (or non-working days)

Now, you can create any combination of a week with a mix of working and non-working days. And these don’t have to be consecutive.

So in our example, where Monday, Tuesday and Thursday are working days, the code would be 0010111

And you can use this code in the NETWORKDAYS.INTL function as shown below:

=NETWORKDAYS.INTL(B1,B2,"0010111",E2:E12)

Calculating number of working days in a part time job

Note that the third argument is the string of numbers that represent working and non-working days. This needs to be within the double quotes

The last argument in this formula specifies the range that has the holiday dates.

Calculate all Mondays between two dates

Sometimes, you may not need to calculate the working days but the number of one specific weekday.

For example, suppose you want to calculate the number of Mondays that fall in a given date range (while also accounting for holidays).

A practical use of this could be when you want to know how many update calls will be done during the given dates if the call happens on Mondays.

Suppose you have the data set below where you want to find the number of Monday in between the start and end date:

To calculate the number of Mondays, I will be using the NETWORKDAYS.INTL function with the string on seven consecutive numbers that represent the days in the week.

This is nothing but a variation of the example where we calculate non-consecutive working days. In this example, we need to specify only Monday as the working day and rest all are the weekend days.

So the string of numbers would be “0111111”, where 0 represents a working day for Monday.

The below formula would give you the number of working Mondays between the start and end date (while also accounting for the holidays):

=NETWORKDAYS.INTL(B1,B2,"0111111",E2:E12)

Calculate number of Mondays between two dates

If you get a hang of how to use NETWORKDAYS and NETWORKDAYS.INTL functions in Google Sheets, you can easily manage situations where you have to calculate workdays between two days.

Hope you found this tutorial useful.

You may also like the following Google Sheets tutorials:

Sours: https://spreadsheetpoint.com/calculate-days-between-two-dates-google-sheets/
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Count Days Between Dates in Google Sheets

Use the NETWORKDAYS function in Google Sheets to calculate the number of whole business days between specified start and end dates. With this function, weekend days (Saturday and Sunday) are automatically removed from the total. Specific days, such as statutory holidays, can be omitted, too.

NETWORKDAYS Function Syntax and Arguments

A function's syntax refers to the layout of the function and includes the function's name, brackets, and arguments.

The syntax for the NETWORKDAYS function is NETWORKDAYS(start_date, end_date, [holidays]).

The arguments are:

  • Start_date — the start date of the chosen period (required)
  • End_date — the end date of the chosen period (required)
  • Holidays — one or more additional dates that are excluded from the total number of working days (optional)

Use date values, serial numbers, or the cell reference to the location of this data in the worksheet for both date arguments.

Holiday dates can be date values entered directly into the formula or the cell references to the location of the data in the worksheet.

Because NETWORKDAYS does not automatically convert data to date formats, date values entered directly into the function for all three arguments should be entered using the DATE or DATEVALUE functions to avoid calculation errors.

  1. Select the cell where you'd like the result to be displayed.

  2. Enter the formula and appropriate parameters. For example, to calculate the workdays between the date in cells A3 and A4, enter =NETWORKDAYS(A3,A4). This tells Sheets to calculate the workdays between 7/11/2016 and 11/4/2016.

  3. To calculate workdays without using cell references, enter =NETWORKDAYS(date,date) — for example, =NETWORKDAYS(7/11/16,11/4/2016).

    The #VALUE! error value is returned if any argument contains an invalid date.

The Math Behind the Function

Google Sheets processes its calculation in two steps. First, it assesses the straightforward count of working days between the two stipulated dates. 

After that, it removes every date specified in the holidays argument, if the date occurred on a weekday. For example, if the time period included two holidays (e.g., Memorial Day and Independence Day, in the United States), and those days both occur on a weekday, then the original count between dates is reduced by two, and the answer is displayed in the spreadsheet.

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Sours: https://www.lifewire.com/count-the-number-of-days-between-two-dates-3123876

One of the most common uses for Google Sheets is to create calendars and to handle information about dates, such as timesheets or vacation schedules.

Many users who create a spreadsheets dealing with dates find themselves needing to calculate how many days there are between two dates; that is, they need to find how many days there are between (as an example) July 1, 2018, and January 31, 2019.

You could just look on a calendar and count the days up by hand, and that would work fine if the dates were very close together, but for large numbers of dates or dates that are far apart, a little help from the computer would sure be nice.

Fortunately, Google Sheets has a number of ways to find the number of days between two dates. Let’s take a look at the functions you can use to calculate days between dates in Google Sheets.

How to Calculate Days Between Dates in Google Sheets

Before getting started, it’s important to note that these methods only work when using the American date format. If you’re not in the United States, you can go into Google Sheets and change your Locale and Time Zone if you want to use these methods.

That being said, let’s take a look at how to find the number of days between two dates in Google Sheets.

The MINUS Function

Unlike Excel, Google Sheets has a subtraction function which is very handy for calculating simple date differences. MINUS is Sheets’ subtraction function and, because of the way dates are stored internally (as integers describing the number of days since a certain date in the past), it works just fine for deducting one date from another. That is, as long as the dates are both in the same format. The syntax for MINUS is: =MINUS(value 1, value 2).

To use MINUS, open a blank Google Sheets spreadsheet in your browser. Enter (as an example) ‘4/4/2017’ and ‘5/15/2017’ in cells B3 and C3.

Now, select cell D3, which is where we’ll put the MINUS function. Click inside the ‘fx’ bar, and then input ‘=MINUS(C3, B3)’ and press Enter. Cell D3 will now return the value 40, as shown directly below.

google dates

This means there are 40 days between 4/5/2017 and 5/15/2017. You can also find the difference between the dates just by entering the cell references and not bothering with the MINUS function.

For example, click cell E3 and input ‘=C3-B3’ in the function bar, as shown in the snapshot directly below. That will also return 40. Although, since you are directly subtracting dates without MINUS, the value in cell E will probably display in date format and look very strange.

You can convert the cell format to show an integer value by selecting Format > Number and Number.

google dates2

You might also input the cell references with the earlier date first. If you entered ‘=B3-C3’ in the function bar, the cell would contain the value -40. This highlights that 4/4/2017 is 40 days behind 5/15/2017.

The DATEDIF Function

DATEDIF is a function that helps you find the total days, months, or years between two dates. You can find the total days between two dates entered on the spreadsheet or include the dates within DATEDIF instead.

The syntax for DATEDIF is:

DATEDIF(start_date, end_date, unit). The unit for the function can be D (days), M (months) or Y (years).

To find the difference between 4/4/2017 and 5/15/2017 with DATEDIF, you should select a cell to add the function to (F3, in our case) and input ‘=DATEDIF’ in the ‘fx’ bar. Then, expand the function with brackets that include the start date and end date cell references B3 and C3.

The unit days, otherwise “D,” should also be at the end of the function. So the full function is ‘=DATEDIF(B3, C3, “D”),’ which returns the value 40, as shown below.

google dates3

DATEDIF will also work if you put the date information directly into the formula. Click a spreadsheet cell to add DATEDIF to, and then input ‘=DATEDIF(“4/5/2017”, “5/15/2017″,”D”)’ in the fx bar.

That will return 40 in the selected cell as shown below.

google dates4

The DAY360 Function

Google Sheets includes DAY360, which calculates the difference between dates for a 360-day year. The 360-day calendar is used primarily for financial spreadsheets in which interest rate calculations might be required.

The syntax for DAYS360 is:

=DAYS360(start_date, end_date, [method]). The [method] is an optional indicator you can include for the day count method.

To use this function to your Google Sheets spreadsheet for the dates 1/1/2016 and 1/1/2017, enter ‘1/1/2016’ in cell B4 as the start date, and then input ‘1/1/2017’ in C4 as the end date for the function.

Now, select cell D4, input the function ‘=DAYS360(B4, C4)’ in the ‘fx’ bar and press Enter. Then cell D4 will include a total of 360 days between the selected dates. Note that the only real use for this particular function is if you are working with interest rates.

google dates5

The NETWORKDAYS Function

NETWORKDAYS also calculates the number of days between dates, but it’s not entirely the same as the others. This function only counts the weekdays, so it leaves weekends out of the equation. (Read it as “Net Workdays” rather than “Network Days”.)

As such, you can find the total number of weekdays between a couple of dates with NETWORKDAYS, and you can also specify extra holidays so that it excludes other dates.

The syntax for NETWORKDAYS is:

NETWORKDAYS(start_date, end_date, [holidays]).

You can add this function to your spreadsheet with the example dates 4/4/2017 and 5/15/2017 entered in cells B3 and C3. Select a cell to include the day total in, and click in the ‘fx’ bar to insert the function.

Input ‘=NETWORKDAYS(B3, C3)’ and press the Enter key to add the function to whichever spreadsheet cell you’ve chosen for it. The NETWORKDAYS cell will include the total 29 for the number of days between the dates.

To add a holiday date to the function, first, enter ‘4/17/2017’ in cell A3. Select the NETWORKDAYS cell, click the fx bar, and modify the function by adding the cell reference A3 to it. So the function would then be =NETWORKDAYS(B3, C3, A3), which will return 28 with the extra bank holiday also deducted from the total days.

google dates6

Other Important Date-Related Functions

There are a number of date-related functions in Sheets that you should be familiar with if you are going to be doing a lot of work with dates.

  • The DATE function converts a provided year, month, and day into a date. The format is DATE(year,month,day). For example, DATE(2019,12,25) returns “12/25/2019”.
  •  The DATEVALUE function converts a properly-formatted date string into a date integer. The format is DATEVALUE(date string); the date string can be any appropriate string, such as “12/25/2019” or “1/23/2012 8:5:30”.
  • The DAY function returns the day of the month that a specific date falls on, in numeric format. The format is DAY(date). For example, DAY(“12/25/2019”) returns 25.
  • The DAYS function returns the number of days between two dates. The format is DAYS (end date, start date). For example, DAYS(“12/25/20189”, “8/31/2019”) returns 116.
  • The EDATE function returns a date a specific number of months before or after the given date. The format is EDATE(start date, number of months). For example, EDATE(“8/31/2019”, -1) returns “7/31/2019”.
  • The MONTH function returns the month of the year that a specific date falls on, in numeric format. The format is MONTH(date). For example, MONTH(“8/30/2019”) returns 8.
  • The TODAY function returns the current date as a date value. The format is TODAY(). For example, at the time of this writing, TODAY() would return “8/31/2019”.
  • The WEEKDAY function returns a numeric value showing the day of the week of the date provided. The format is WEEKDAY(date, type) and type can be 1, 2, or 3. If type is 1, days are counted from Sunday and Sunday has a value of 1. If type is 2, days are counted from Monday and the value of Monday is 1. If type is 3, days are counted from Monday and the value of Monday is 0. For example, 4/30/2019 is a Tuesday, and WEEKDAY(“4/30/2019”,1) would return 3, while WEEKDAY(“4/30/2019”,2) would return 2 and WEEKDAY(“4/30/2019”,3) would return 1.
  • The YEAR function returns a numeric value showing the year of the date provided. The format is YEAR(date). For example, YEAR(“12/25/2019”) would return 2019.

Google Sheets is an incredibly powerful program, especially for an application that’s completely free. While it may not be quite as powerful as something like Microsoft Excel, it can still handle a wide range of tasks, including this one.

Sours: https://www.alphr.com/calculate-days-between-dates-google-sheets/

Sheets google days function

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If you want to count the number of days between two dates, you can use the DAYS, DATEDIF, and NETWORKDAYS functions in Google Sheets to do so. DAYS and DATEDIF count all days, while NETWORKDAYS excludes Saturday and Sunday.

Counting All Days Between Two Dates

To count the days between two dates, regardless of whether the day is a weekday or a holiday, you can use the DAYS or DATEDIF functions.

Using the DAYS Function

The DAYS function is the easiest to use, so long as you’re not fussed about excluding holidays or weekend days. DAYS will take note of additional days held in a leap year, however.

To use DAYS to count between two days, open your Google Sheets spreadsheet and click on an empty cell. Type , replacing the dates shown with your own.

Use your dates in reverse order, so put the end date first, and the start date second. Using the start date first will result in DAYS returning a negative value.

The DAYS function used to calculate the days between two dates in Google Sheets

As the example above shows, the DAYS function counts the total number of days between two specific dates. The date format used in the example above is the U.K. format, DD/MM/YYYY. If you’re in the U.S., make sure you use MM/DD/YYYY.

You’ll need to use the default date format for your locale. If you want to use a different format, click File > Spreadsheet Settings and change the “Locale” value to another location.

You can also use the DAYS function with cell references. If you’ve specified two dates in separate cells, you can type , replacing the A1 and A11 cell references with your own.

The DAYS function in Google Sheets, calculating the number of days held in two other cells

In the example above, a difference of 29 days is recorded from dates held in cells E6 and F10.

Using the DATEDIF Function

An alternative to DAYS is the DATEDIF function, which allows you to calculate the number of days, months, or years between two set dates.

Like DAYS, DATEDIF takes leap days into account and will calculate all days, rather than limit you to business days. Unlike DAYS, DATEDIF doesn’t work in reverse order, so use the start date first and the end date second.

If you want to specify the dates in your DATEDIF formula, click on an empty cell and type , replacing the dates with your own.

The DATEDIF function in Google Sheets, calculating the number of days between two set dates used within the formula

If you want to use dates from cell references in your DATEDIF formula, type , replacing the A7 and G7 cell references with your own.

The DATEDIF function in Google Sheets, calculating the number of days between two dates, using two individual cell references

Counting Business Days Between Two Dates

The DAYS and DATEDIF functions allow you to find the days between two dates, but they count all days. If you want to count business days only, and you want to discount additional holiday days, you can use the NETWORKDAYS function.

NETWORKDAYS treats Saturday and Sunday as weekend days, discounting these during its calculation. Like DATEDIF, NETWORKDAYS uses the start date first, followed by the end date.

To use NETWORKDAYS, click on an empty cell and type . Using a nested DATE function allows you to convert years, months, and dates figures into a serial date number, in that order.

Replace the figures shown with your own year, month, and date figures.

The NETWORKDAYS function in Google Sheets, calculating the business days between two dates and ignoring Saturday and Sunday using a nested DATE formula

You can also use cell references within your NETWORKDAYS formula, instead of a nested DATE function.

Type  in an empty cell, replacing the A6 and B6 cell references with your own.

The NETWORKDAYS function in Google Sheets, calculating the business days between two dates and ignoring Saturday and Sunday, using the dates from two cell references

In the above example, the NETWORKDAYS function is used to calculate the working business days between various dates.

If you want to exclude certain days from your calculations, like days of certain holidays, you can add these at the end of your NETWORKDAYS formula.

To do that, click on an empty cell and type . In this example, A6 is the start date, B6 is the end date, and the B6:D6 range is a range of cells containing days of holidays to be excluded.

You can replace the cell references with your own dates, using a nested DATE function, if you’d prefer. To do this, type , replacing the cell references and DATE criteria with your own figures.

The NETWORKDAYS function in Google Sheets, calculating the business days between two dates and ignoring Saturday and Sunday, with additional holiday days excluded

In the above example, the same range of dates is used for three NETWORKDAYS formulae. With 11 standard business days reported in cell B2, between two and three additional holiday days are removed in cells B3 and B4.

Sours: https://www.howtogeek.com/447556/count-the-days-between-two-dates-in-google-sheets/
Count Workdays in Google Sheets - NETWORKDAYS or NETWORDAYS.INTL Functions

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