Sounds dogs love

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5 Sounds My Dogs Love

In the story “8 Things I No Longer Do Because I Have Dogs,” I shared that killing bugs tops my list of don’ts because the sound scares Spot and Dolly. One good thwack! will clear the room.

Turns out, I’m not the only pet parent who does things differently — or not at all — to appease the ears of her pups.

Tracy commented: “I don’t stab frozen dinners with a fork anymore to ventilate the plastic. The sound drove my dog crazy, and now as soon as she sees me take one out of the freezer she goes absolutely ballistic. I have to carefully peel back the corner of the plastic or gently slit it with a knife. Then I allow her to attack the box.”

And Riki added: “I no longer watch any TV show or movie that has animals in it. My Shih-Tzus (three of the four), which I lovingly call Team Shih-Tzu (because it’s us against them), will bark at the TV if they see or hear an animal until you change the channel. The leader of the pack knows the sounds of commercials and comes running from other rooms when she hears the first little sound. It’s really cute for about five seconds. However, it is fun to watch the reactions of people when they see it happen for the first time. I wouldn’t change my heathens one bit!”

Let’s now turn the topic of discussion to sounds our dogs love to hear. I’ll start with these five:

1. Laptop closing

When I started working from home three years ago, Spot and Dolly quickly learned that an open laptop meant they must amuse themselves. The sound of my laptop closing, though, signals the end of work and beginning of play. Spot immediately goes for a toy, while Dolly begins stretching for the activity to come.

2. Bag opening

As a rule, I don’t feed Spot and Dolly processed people food. My father, on the other hand, sees nothing wrong with tossing a cracker or chip their way when I am not around. Because of this, Spot and Dolly come running whenever they hear the sound of a food bag opening, and they sit in eager anticipation of junk-food goodness (or badness, in my book).

3. Ducks quacking

Near our home, a small, manmade lake hosts a healthy population of ducks year-round. They begin quacking amongst themselves as soon as they see Spot and Dolly approaching, which makes the pups want to reach them even sooner. We usually sit near the water to watch the winged creatures, who watch us back warily.

4. Doorbell ringing

I don’t tolerate nuisance barking well. Not only does it disturb everyone within hearing distance, but it also indicates a dog in distress, one with issues going unaddressed. Spot and Dolly tend to be pretty quiet by nature, with Dolly occasionally barking at Spot during play but never loud enough or for long enough to bother my neighbors.

The doorbell ringing proves the exception, with both pups excitedly announcing the arrival of someone or something. Yes, I could train them to not bark when they hear the bell, but it happens so rarely, and they have excellent manners otherwise.

5. Toys squeaking

It’s an obvious sound for such a list, to be sure, but it’s one that brings Spot to his feet no matter the time of day or night. More than once, I have accidentally stepped on a squeaky ball in the dark and had to explain that I was only going to the bathroom, not waking him for a 4 a.m. game of fetch.

Are there sounds your dogs love to hear? Or hate, for that matter? And how do they react? Please share them in the comments!

Sours: https://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/5-sounds-dogs-love

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Sours: https://www.iheart.com/artist/sounds-dogs-love-32894020/
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These are the music genres that dogs love listening to most

I truly never knew that dogs listening to music was a thing until I started dog-sitting in L.A. As an owner left me with her poodle, Jimmy, she asked me to play Beethoven for him, especially if he started to bark or pace back and forth. As soon as she left, Jimmy indeed barked. And barked. And barked. But when I turned the music on, he stopped and laid on the couch. Magic. (“Moonlight Sonata” was his favorite — he’d go lie down in his bed for it — and I can’t listen to it now without thinking about him.) When Beethoven would end, Jimmy would bark, and we’d listen to it again.

As it turns out, Jimmy’s not the only dog who likes to relax by listening to music. One 2017 study from Psychology & Behavior even reported which types of of music dogs love most. It found that two genres, soft rock and reggae, caused dogs to be more relaxed and less stressed than others.

For the study, researchers examined the effect of various genres of music on the stress levels of kenneled dogs. To do so, they looked at the physiological and behavioral response of 38 dogs over five days and played five genres of music for them: soft rock, Motown, pop, reggae, and classical. When dogs heard soft rock and reggae, their Heart Rate Variability (HRV) — the time intervals between heartbeats — was higher, which meant decreased stress.

And, during all five types of music, the dogs spent much less time standing and much more time lying down, indicating they were more relaxed, Dr. Sara Ochoa, a veterinarian and veterinary consultant for DogLab, a website that suggests the best gear and treats to buy for your dog, tells Mic. Although the dogs’ barking habits didn’t change while the music played, the dogs were more likely to bark when the music would end.

The study also found that the effect of habituation — acclimation to a new stimulus, like a certain genre of music — on dogs may be reduced by increasing the variety of music. In other words, if your dog seems stressed by a certain type of music, you might want to play a mixture of different genres, says Dr. Ochoa, making sure to include the type of music you want your dog to like throughout. Then, slowly increase the number of times that specific type of music is played in the mix until your dog is okay with it.

Li-ran Bukovza, found of PuppyTip, a dog advice website, has personally seen the positive benefit of certain types of music on dogs. “Genres such as reggae and soft rock usually have a slower tempo, which some dogs may find more relaxing,” he says. “This also explains why songs with more beats per minute — like hard rock, heavy metal, or anything with a heavy bass or too many digital noises — tend to cause more excitement or anxiety.”

To that point, Dr. Ochoa notes that in an earlier study, from 2012, a team of researchers from Colorado State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine researched the effect of certain types of music on kenneled dogs’ stress levels, including heavy metal.They observed 117 dogs over a four-month period to see how they responded to heavy metal, classical, and another type of classical music that was designed specifically to soothe dogs. Classical music was found to relax them and caused them to sleep more, while the heavy metal caused them to tremble and increased their agitation and stress levels. The music that had been specially designed for them had no significant effect on their behavior.

Bukovza adds that, just like with humans, it’s not only genre that matters for dogs, but volume. “Music can soothe, upset, or put your dog in a playful mood, depending on the type of music and the volume,” she explains. “Also, remember that dogs’ ears are much more sensitive than humans’, so be sure not to play any music too loudly.”

When choosing music for your dog, Bukovza also says to keep in mind that, since an adult dog has approximately the intelligence of a human toddler, a good rule of thumb is to consider whether you would play this music for a baby. “Pay attention to your dog’s reaction when you’re around. Some dogs have been known to howl along to their favorite songs,” he says. “If your dog shakes, whimpers, or pants as music is played, it’s making them anxious and needs to be changed, lowered, or turned off.”

She suggests playing classical music to relax your dog if they’re anxious, having separation anxiety, or need to sleep. If you need to drown out loud noises like construction or fireworks, however, reggae or classic rock may work better since they tend to have louder bass in their songs. Dr. Ochoa agrees with Bukovza, adding that music types can be used interchangeably, as long as the music you choose is louder than the noise you’re trying to drown out.

Dan Schachner, Animal Planet’sPuppy Bowl referee, who also fosters dogs regularly, tells Mic that he experiences the study’s findings in his day-to-day life. “I’m also an unapologetic fan of yacht rock, which falls squarely in the realm of soft rock, and can report with certainty that, yes, the pooches love Air Supply,” he says.

He cites other research, too, that concluded that classical music calmed down dogs more so than other types of auditory stimulation, such as human conversation, heavy metal music, and pop music. “And, from experience, here is what I know: If music can calm me down, then it can calm my dog(s) down.”

Amman Ahmed is the founder of MusicforPets, the company behind RelaxMyDog (and RelaxMyCat), which creates audio and visual programming specifically for animals. Initially, Ahmed created a company, Roundwaves, to help people relax through music, but while working with Salvadoran composer Ricardo Henriquez, he soon realized the music was helping Henriquez’ dog, Zuki, relax. He’d become anxious whenever he heard gunshots, which were common where they lived.

“We knew we were onto something and realized the effect of our music on wider issues for dogs — such as anxiety, sleep problems, while they’re with a petsitter, and general loneliness,” Ahmed tells Mic. He realized there was a gap in the market for a natural solution — as opposed to medication — to help dogs in these situations, and RelaxMyDog was born. The company specializes in music for dogs to help them with everything from depression to separation anxiety. Although they’ve created many modified music types, from soft rock to classical piano, their top three genres are reggae, classical, and Oriental.

Ahmed adds that his company’s secret musical formula for their programs are based on seven years’ worth of feedback research. Their YouTube channel alone has almost 437,000 subscribers — and counting — and in 2018, RelaxMyDog and RelaxMyCat were listened to by 20 million dogs and cats on all their platforms, from websites to music streaming services.

Today, MusicForPets gets some emotional requests from fans, says Ahmed. “Pet owners reach out saying their cat or dog just passed away and they want to use the animal’s favorite track to play at the funeral. It is insanely heartwarming that our music was such a deep part of their pet’s life.” He says messages like this are one of thousands that reinstate the “why” behind his company’s purpose and encourages people to introduce music to their dogs. “All you have to do is press ‘play’ and you’ll see your pet settle into a relaxed state,” he says.

However, Dr. Ochoa says that what works for one dog may not work for another and the only way to know is through trial and error. “Be cognizant of how your dog responds and go from there,” she says.

Correction: This article has been updated to reflect a clarification from an expert.

This article was originally published on

Sours: https://www.mic.com/life/what-music-do-dogs-like-heres-what-experts-recommend-you-play-for-your-pet-18218089

Sounds Dogs Love to Hear

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Sours: https://www.appannie.com/en/apps/ios/app/sounds-dogs-love-to-hear/

Dogs love sounds

    • Puppy Barking (Sound Effect)
    • Sounds Dogs Love to Hear Most · 2020
    • Puppy Whimpers (Sound Effect)
    • Sounds Dogs Love to Hear Most · 2020
    • Squeaky Toys (Sound Effect)
    • Sounds Dogs Love to Hear Most · 2020
    • Rainforest (Sound Effect)
    • Sounds Dogs Love to Hear Most · 2020
    • By the Swamp (Sound Effect)
    • Sounds Dogs Love to Hear Most · 2020
    • Squeaking Doors (Sound Effect)
    • Sounds Dogs Love to Hear Most · 2020
    • Dog Growling (Sound Effect)
    • Sounds Dogs Love to Hear Most · 2020
Sours: https://music.apple.com/gb/artist/sounds-dogs-love/1543940743
Sound Dogs Love All Time - HQ

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Sours: https://www.iheart.com/artist/sounds-dogs-love-32894020/songs

Similar news:

I’m sure you’ll agree:

A happy, playful pooch is one of the cutest things ever.

Whether you’re a brand new dog owner, or a more-seasoned one…

…you’ve almost definitely learned about which sounds dogs hate

But that begs the question:

What sounds do dogs love? 

Well, you’ve come to the right place! In this guide, we’ve compiled 20 sounds that dogs love to hear, as well as a little but of extra insight into why they love each sound so much.

Ready? Let’s dive in!

1. Their Owner’s Voice

Not surprisingly, one sound dogs love more than anything is the sound of their owners’ voices.

Dogs not only recognize the voice itself, but can also distinguish the tone that their owner uses.

Cheerful and playful tones that are high in volume and pitch tell your dog that you are happy and proud of their behavior. 

A soft and reassuring tone (lower in volume but still higher in pitch) is usually the tone of voice used when sharing affection or bonding with your dog. These are sounds that your dog cherishes.

2. Sounds that Signal Preparation for a Walk

Dogs love the special time that’s devoted to them during walks with their beloved owners.

Specific words (such as walk or park), the jingling sound of a leash or the clinking of house keys can trigger a very happy response from your dog as they anticipate the outing.

Once you understand the messages these sounds are sending, you’ll want to focus on quickly learning to be sensitive about using certain words or handling certain items that trigger this excitement in your dog when you’re not ready to head out the door.

The last thing you want to do is disappoint your furry friend.

3. Barking Buddies

Although we often assume aggressive or territorial motivation when dogs bark at other dogs, in many cases it actually a way of initiating play.

Dogs bond and determine social structure through play and may initiate playful behavior by barking at each other. Playful barking is usually accompanied by tail wagging and non aggressive overall posture.

When your dog develops these social connections, you might consider scheduling ‘play dates’ with other dog owners, either in your own yard or at a local dog park.

4. Squeaky toys

Sounds dogs love image 1

The sound made by toys that squeak when your dog bites it promote a natural form of play.

The squeaking noise is similar to the sound that some sort of natural prey (i.e., mice, birds, etc.) might make when they are  frightened or injured.

This sound will excite a dog and entice it to keep playing or attacking the toy as long as it continues to make the noise. These toys can be used by you to play with and bond with your four-legged friend, or as a means of self-entertainment for your dog when you’re away from home.

5. Music

Dogs can find music very calming. Most dogs will enjoy music with a slow, melodic rhythm including classical, soft jazz and country music.

Music is used by some animal shelters to reduce stress in the dogs under their care. It is important to note, however, that music such as heavy metal can have the opposite effect, causing a dog to become agitated, restless and/or aggressive. 

Whenever your pup next seems agitated consider playing some different types of music to try and calm them down (and find out what type of music they enjoy the most). 

You can also consider leaving music on during the day if your dog is home alone to keep them calm in your absence. 

6. Ticking Clocks 

A ticking clock also generates a slow, melodic rhythm that can be soothing for dogs.

For puppies and younger dogs, the sound made by a ticking clock can actually be similar to their mother’s heartbeat.

Therefore, placing a clock in or near a young dog’s bedding may bring some emotional comfort to your dog if is missing its mother. 

7. Familiar Cars 

Many dogs learn to associate certain sounds with the departure (and long-awaited arrival) of their owners.

They can become very much aware of the sound associated specifically with their owner’s car, as well as the cars of frequent friendly visitors.

Your dog is bound to become very happy and excited when hearing the sounds of these familiar  cars approaching as they anticipate the love and attention they’re about to receive. 

8. Bells 

Sounds dogs love image 2

Dogs like the sound of ringing bells and, in some cases, can actually be trained to ring bells to let their owner know they want or need something.

Toys with bells can also be fun for dogs to chase during a game of fetch. If you ever wonder where your dog has wandered off to in your home, you might want to consider adding a bell to your dog’s collar. 

9. Bird Sounds 

Most dogs become very excited when hearing bird sounds because of their canine instincts.

Dogs are naturally eager to chase, capture and play with birds because they are a common type of prey.

If you’re interested in picking up some additional toys to offer your dog a wider variety of entertainment options, consider some toys made for dogs that make bird sounds.

10. White Noise

Another calming noise for dogs is white noise. White noise is made by combining all of the tones that a canine’s ear is capable of hearing.

This type of noise can be used to help block out other noises that dogs may find agitating and upsetting, such as the sounds of traffic or other outdoor animals.

If you’re looking to help your dog sleep, it’s well-worth investing in a little white noise machine such as this one on Amazon. Most white noise machines will also come pre-loaded with a bank of nature sounds such as falling rain, rustling leaves or water flowing in a creek. 

11. Clinking Dishware 

General noises made while working in the kitchen are very interesting and appealing to dogs as they, of course, can signal that something yummy may end up in their food dish!

Allowing your dog to watch you while you work in the kitchen (while making sure they stay out of your way, of course) can be a great source of unexpected time shared with your dog. 

12. The Doorbell 

sounds dogs love image 3

When your doorbell rings, you immediately stop what you’re doing to answer it. Your dog senses this and anticipates something exciting happening or someone special arriving. 

If the sound that your doorbell makes seems to startle your dog, consider investing in a multi-sound doorbell and changing the sound to something a little less alarming (such as chimes or marimbas). 

13. Human Baby Noises

Dogs often wag their tail at the first sight of a baby, or even when they hear a baby make laughing or cooing sounds.

This could be because dogs view babies as a playmate or someone that will give them attention. However, whatever the reason, dogs seem to enjoy the sounds babies make (as confirmed by the American Kennel Club)

Due to the fact that dogs will usually take a lot of  interest in babies, it’s very important that as a dog owner you take care in ensuring babies and young children remain safe around your dog.

You should take time to train your dog on how to behave around babies and always monitor any interactions between your dog and babies very closely.

14. Whistles 

Dogs respond in a happy and excited way to the high-pitched sounds of whistles from their owners.

It’s nearly impossible for humans to express anger when whistling and the sound is very different to the voice that a dog usually hears from their owner.

Because this is a sound that a dog quickly associates with a happy communication from their beloved owner, they pay close attention and usually respond quickly and cheerfully to their owner’s whistle.

As dogs are so attentive to whistling sounds, they can be trained to respond to whistles in the same way they respond to other voice commands, meaning you can teach your four-legged friend to perform a trick whenever they hear you whistle. 

Whistling sounds made by humans using commercial whistles can have the same positive result. 

15. Clicking or Kissing Noises 

Many animals seem to like or respond to this type of noise, but as dogs are more inclined to interact with humans, their eager and happy response to this type of noise is much more evident.

This is also a sound that dogs are taught to like and respond to by humans, rather than being a more natural impulse for them.

The sound is a clear, sharp sound that is noticeably different than other environmental or background noises. Therefore, dogs can easily distinguish the noise as an intentional signal from their owner as opposed to random background noise.

Dogs also learn that when they respond to this noise, they are usually rewarded with some affectionate petting and bonding by their owner.

You can also train your dog to associate this noise with a specific activity, such as an invitation to play fetch or go for a walk. 

16. Doors Opening 

sounds dogs love image 4

When doors open and close throughout your home, your dog knows this means that you’re on the move. They love hearing this noise as they think you may be coming to see and spend time with them.

This sound makes tails wag and ears perk up quickly. If you’re using closed doors to restrict your dog’s entry into certain rooms or areas, it’s important to remember that dogs are very sensitive to this type of sound.

If you’ve opened one of these doors, and you don’t remember to close it, your dog may consider that an invitation to enter and explore the restricted area. 

17. Food Being Opened

The simple routine sounds made when opening up a bag of chips or using a can opener triggers excitement for your dog.

They’re excited because they’re wondering if there is a meal or treat on the way. This type of stimulus is unavoidable and, in some cases, dogs can become overly excited.

Once you understand  how your dog responds to this type of stimulation, you can start to expect it and focus on training your dog to remain quiet, calm and patient when working in the kitchen. 

18. Using Kitchen Appliances 

As with other sounds associated with food preparation, both a dog’s ears and mood perk up whenever they hear the refrigerator or oven door being opened.

They’re very likely to come running into the kitchen to see what you’re doing, with the hope that something yummy is coming their way.

It’s important to be aware of this to avoid accidents that may occur if your dog gets underfoot. Again, some behavioral training may be required for your dog to learn to remain calm and out of the way when you’re working in the kitchen. 

19. Laptops Closing 

With more of us working from home, dogs have had to adjust to a new way of life that involves their owners being at home with them much more (but unable to pay attention to them).

They can easily begin to recognize that an open laptop means they have to entertain themselves. The sound of a laptop closing can become the  signal to your dog that work has ended and playtime is about to begin! 

20. The Television 

Dogs can identify images and sounds made by both humans and animals on television.

There are even programs that are produced specifically for dogs! An example is DogTV, which is an HDTV channel that provides a higher number of frames per second and color that is more  suitable to a dogs’ vision.

There are scenes that include a dog responding to a doorbell being rung, obeying commands given by human voices and other normal homely activities. 

This type of program can be played when your dog is home alone, which can relax them and mitigate any uneasy feelings that come with their owner being away. 

 

So, there you have it! 20 sounds your dog will love. If you enjoyed this post, why not share it on your social media channels?

Sours: https://tranquiltechniques.com/sounds-dogs-love/


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