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tizanidine

What is the most important information I should know about tizanidine?

You should not take tizanidine if you are also taking fluvoxamine (Luvox) or ciprofloxacin (Cipro).

Do not use tizanidine at a time when you need muscle tone for safe balance and movement during certain activities.

What is tizanidine?

Tizanidine is a short-acting muscle relaxer. It works by blocking nerve impulses (pain sensations) that are sent to your brain.

Tizanidine is used to treat spasticity by temporarily relaxing muscle tone.

Tizanidine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking tizanidine?

You should not use tizanidine if you are allergic to it, or if:

  • you also take the antidepressant fluvoxamine (Luvox); or
  • you also take the antibiotic ciprofloxacin (Cipro).

To make sure tizanidine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • liver disease;
  • kidney disease; or
  • low blood pressure.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It is not known whether tizanidine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take tizanidine?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

In most cases you may take tizanidine up to 3 times in one day if needed. Allow 6 to 8 hours to pass between doses.

You may take tizanidine with or without food, but take it the same way each time. Switching between taking tizanidine with food and taking it without food can make the medicine less effective or cause increased side effects.

Switching between tizanidine tablets and capsules can also cause changes in side effects or how well the medicine works.

  • Taking the tablets with food can increase your blood levels of tizanidine.
  • Taking the capsules with food can decrease your blood levels of tizanidine.

Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. After making any changes in how you take tizanidine, contact your doctor if you notice any change in side effects or in how well the medicine works.

Tizanidine is a short-acting medication, and its effects will be most noticeable between 1 and 3 hours after you take it. You should take tizanidine only for daily activities that require relief from muscle spasms.

Do not take more than three doses (36 mg) in a hour period. Too much of this medicine can damage your liver.

You will need frequent blood tests to check your liver function.

If you stop using tizanidine suddenly after long-term use, you may have withdrawal symptoms such as dizziness, fast heartbeats, tremors, and anxiety. Ask your doctor how to safely stop using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at

Overdose symptoms may include weakness, drowsiness, confusion, slow heart rate, shallow breathing, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking tizanidine?

Do not use tizanidine at a time when you need muscle tone for safe balance and movement during certain activities. In some situations, it may be dangerous for you to have reduced muscle tone.

Drinking alcohol with this medicine can cause side effects.

This medicine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

What other drugs will affect tizanidine?

Taking tizanidine with other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can cause dangerous side effects or death. Ask your doctor before taking a sleeping pill, narcotic pain medicine, prescription cough medicine, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

  • acyclovir;
  • ticlopidine;
  • zileuton;
  • birth control pills;
  • an antibiotic --ciprofloxacin, gemifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, or ofloxacin;
  • blood pressure medicine --clonidine, guanfacine, methyldopa;
  • heart rhythm medicine --amiodarone, mexiletine, propafenone, verapamil; or
  • stomach acid medicine --cimetidine, famotidine.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with tizanidine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about tizanidine.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: Revision date: 2/27/

Your use of the content provided in this service indicates that you have read, understood and agree to the End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by clicking on this link.

Sours: https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/da1

Tizanidine (Zanaflex)

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Tizanidine is usually taken up to 3 times in one day. Allow 6 to 8 hours to pass between doses. Do not take more than three doses (36 mg) in a hour period. Too much of this medicine can damage your liver.

You may take tizanidine with or without food, but take it the same way each time. Switching between taking tizanidine with food and taking it without food can make the medicine less effective or cause increased side effects.

Switching between tizanidine tablets and capsules may cause changes in side effects or how well the medicine works.

  • Taking the tablets with food can increase your blood levels of tizanidine.
  • Taking the capsules with food can decrease your blood levels of tizanidine.

If you make any changes in how you take tizanidine, tell your doctor if you notice any change in side effects or in how well the medicine works.

Tizanidine is a short-acting medication, and its effects will be most noticeable between 1 and 3 hours after you take it. You should take tizanidine only for daily activities that require relief from muscle spasms.

You will need frequent medical tests.

If you stop using tizanidine suddenly after long-term use, you may have withdrawal symptoms such as dizziness, fast heartbeats, tremors, and anxiety. Ask your doctor how to safely stop using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What should I do if I missed a dose of Tizanidine (Zanaflex)?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

Sours: https://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/tizanidine
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Hydrocodone Pills Identifier – Types of Capsules and Syrups

Hydrocodone is a commonly used opioid painkilling drug. As with all drugs, people like to know what the drug does and what exactly they are taking.

There are large quantities of different types of hydrocodone pills, like M or IP , and the ways of the opioid administration. Due to hydrocodone structure, these can be in both syrups and pills. Identifying what they are and which is which can be complicated. This article aims to clear up those complications and give an overview of different brand names.

Brand Names

The drug is a narcotic analgesic that is available as generic and different brand name medicines. These combinations are used to treat severe pain or a dry cough. Most hydrocodone brand name products contain the opioid along with another non-narcotic medication.

Brand Names Of “Pure” Hydrocodone Pills Are:

Hydrocodone Acetaminophen Brand Names: 

Among combination products, there are medications used to treat cough or medications more effective in treating pain.

Combination With Ibuprofen Brand Names:

  • Ibudone
  • Reprexain
  • Vicoprofen

Other Names For Combination With Homatropine:

Hydrocodone Dosage Forms

There are various dosage forms for combination products. Depending on the brand name and manufacturer, the doses of active ingredients will vary. However, speaking about pure hydrocodone pills, there are 2 branded versions available: Zohydro ER and Hysingla ER. Zohydro ER comes in doses starting from 10 to 50mg. However, doctors initially prescribe a dosage of less than 15mg.

Doctor writing a hydrocodone prescription.

The starting dose is to take 10mg every 12 hours for individuals above There is a lack of evidence to suggest that the medication is suitable for individuals under While previously it was common for doctors to prescribe cough syrup with the opioid, FDA, starting , banned all such medication for pediatric use.

For people tolerant to opioid use, health professionals can increase the dose by 10 mg every 12 hours after days. However, halt the increment once the pain management process is effective. Changing the dosage from 10 mg to 15 or 20 mg is a safe shift. Hysingla ER is available in higher doses, from 20 to mg. 

Variables that Affect Dosage Prescription

Health professionals exercise caution when prescribing this medication. This is because of the tendency of people suffering from hydrocodone addiction. Since there is no fixed dosage schedule, the doctor will look at the following factors when prescribing.

  • Tolerance. Individuals that are inexperienced in opioid use require monitoring while taking their initial dosage. Some health professionals prescribe 5mg to test the tolerability of opioid use. People who are not tolerant of opioid use are prescribed very low dosages.
  • Age. FDA decided to ban all medications containing this drug for children under 18 years since , so there is no pediatric dose of this opioid. However, even for patients suffering from pain and more than 18 years of age, the weight requirement is at least lbs.
  • Kidney & Liver Conditions. People suffering from severe liver and/or kidney disease should avoid using this medication. Therefore, the doctor will first advise some kidney and liver tests before determining the max hydrocodone dosage. It is, however, strongly suggested to take a different course of treatment in such cases.

What Does Hydrocodone Look Like?

M and IP

Hydrocodone M pill.

M is a white capsule pill with a back ridge. Supplied by Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, it contains mg of Acetaminophen and 10mg of hydrocodone bitartrate. It is used to treat back pains and arthritis. M contains a relatively large dose of the opioid component and can cause side effects.

Hydrocodone IP pill.

IP is identical; however, its supplier is Amneal Pharmaceuticals.

T

Hydrocodone T pill.

This capsule-shape pill is almost identical to the ones described above. It contains the same dosage of active ingredients, and is manufactured by Ascent Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

IP and G

Hydrocodone IP pill.

A white, capsule-shaped pill that treats back pain and arthritis. It contains Acetaminophen and Bitartrate at the rates of and 5mg, respectively. It is supplied by Amneal Pharmaceuticals. Like any other dosage form, it can cause hydrocodone side effects. If any of them appear, contact your doctor. A healthcare provider can provide some tips in dealing with the adverse reactions, and also prescribe other alternatives for pain.

Hydrocodone G pill.

G is identical. Its dosage and shape are the same as IP

M

Hydrocodone M pill.

Another white, capsule-shaped M pill to treat severe to moderate pain. It contains acetaminophen and bitartrate with a dosage of /mg. This pill is supplied by Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals.

White Pill, M and

Hydrocodone white pill.

This oval-shaped white pill contains the same acetaminophen amount as M or IP (mg) and 5mg of bitartrate. It is supplied by Actavis Pharma Inc.

Hydrocodone M pills.

M is identical; however, its supplier is Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals.

Hydrocodone pill.

is almost identical. However, it is capsule-shaped and supplied by Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Inc.

Hydrocodone V

Hydrocodone V pill.

V is an orange elliptical pill made by Qualitest Pharmaceuticals Inc. It contains a usual acetaminophen amount (mg) and mg of Zohydro ER active ingredient. It is available only by prescription.

Hydrocodone

Hydrocodone pill.

A white, oval-shaped pill by Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Inc. The dosage is /10mg. It is a schedule II drug and has a high potential for abuse and addiction.

V Yellow Pill

Hydrocodone V pill.

This yellow pill with /10mg of active ingredients is oval-shaped and made by Qualitest Pharmaceuticals. It also contains inactive ingredients, such as silicon dioxide, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, povidone, corn starch, stearic acid, and crospovidone.

M pill 10/

10/ M Hydrocodone.

This is a white capsule-shaped pill by Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals. Its dosage is the same as the M pill (/10mg). It’s used to treat chronic pain, and should be eliminated from the body in a few days.

WATSON

WATSON Hydrocodone pills.

This yellow pill is oval in shape and contains mg of acetaminophen and 10 mg of hydrocodone bitartrate. It is made by Watson Pharmaceuticals and is made to treat arthritis and pain.

WATSON and V

WATSON Hydrocodone pills.

This white pill with red dots is oval-shaped and contains /5mg of active ingredients. The drug is manufactured by Watson Pharmaceuticals.

WATSON V Hydrocodone pills.

V is identical. However, it is manufactured by Qualitest Pharmaceuticals.

M Pill

M Hydrocodone pill.

M pill is white and capsule-shaped. This variation is made by Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals and contains a /5mg dose of active ingredients. This dosage of the M pill is the same as in IP The only difference between them is the imprint and the manufacturer. People with liver diseases should be more careful while taking acetaminophen-containing products, as their use can lead to serious liver damage.

WATSON

WATSON pill.

This pill comes in two forms. One is an orange oval and the other, a traditional white capsule. Both are made by Watson Pharmaceuticals and contain the same active ingredients, acetaminophen(mg) and bitartrate(mg). This variation is identical in dosage with M

Hydrocodone – Syrups To Ease Ailments

Hydrocodone syrups are far less common than hydrocodone pills. Here are some examples.

Hydrocodone and Chlorpheniramine Polistirex Prnnkinetic

Hydrocodone and Chlorpheniramine Polistirex Prnnkinetic

A combination of hydrocodone and chlorpheniramine polistirex pennkinetic, this syrup contains 10 and 8 mg of active ingredients, respectively. It has an extended release of 12 hours and aims at treating coughs and allergies. It is made by UCB Inc.

Homatropine Syrup

Hydrocodone Homatropine Syrup.

Hydrocodone Bitartrate And Homatropine Methylbromide Syrup is used to treat coughs and colds. It contains 5 mg of bitartrate and mg of homatropine methylbromide. This syrup has a cherry flavor and is made by various manufacturers, including Endo Pharmaceuticals and Morton Grove Pharmaceuticals.

Identifying Hydrocodone Pills

Identifying types of hydrocodone pills or syrups and their ingredients isn’t always simple. Knowing the meanings of different imprints like M or M is necessary to be always sure about the dose of the medication one is taking. If one is concerned about getting a variant of the drug that is the most suitable, better contact a medical professional. Like all opiate painkillers, the drug can be addictive. Getting the right variety of the drug could help prevent addiction or worse.

For those struggling with opioid abuse, treatment centers offer help and assistance in overcoming the addiction and opioid withdrawal phases.

Find the best treatment options. Call our free and confidential helpline

Most private insurances accepted

Marketing fee may apply

Page Sources

  1. Kathy T. Vo, Xander M.R. van Wijk, Kara L. Lynch, Alan H.B. Wu, Craig G. Smollin, Counterfeit Norco Poisoning Outbreak — San Francisco Bay Area, California, March 25–April 5, , https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mme1.htm
  2. Hydrocodone Pill Identifier, https://pillbox.nlm.nih.gov/pillimage/search_results.php?s=40&getingredient=acetaminophen&submit=search
  3. U.S. Food and Drug Administration, FDA acts to protect kids from serious risks of opioid ingredients contained in some prescription cough and cold products by revising labeling to limit pediatric use, https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-acts-protect-kids-serious-risks-opioid-ingredients-contained-some-prescription-cough-and-cold
  4. U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Acetaminophen: Avoiding Liver Injury, https://www.fda.gov/consumers/consumer-updates/acetaminophen-avoiding-liver-injury
  5. Victor S Sloan, Alphia Jones, Chidi Maduka, Jürgen W G Bentz, A Benefit Risk Review of Pediatric Use of Hydrocodone/Chlorpheniramine, a Prescription
  6. Opioid Antitussive Agent for the Treatment of Cough, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov//
  7. U.S. National Library of Medicine, Hydrocodone Combination Products. https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/ahtml

Published on: September 21st,

Updated on: February 10th,

Olivier George

Olivier George is a medical writer and head manager of the rehab center in California. He spends a lot of time in collecting and analyzing the traditional approaches for substance abuse treatment and assessing their efficiency.

Michael Espelin - Medical reviewer.

8 years of nursing experience in wide variety of behavioral and addition settings that include adult inpatient and outpatient mental health services with substance use disorders, and geriatric long-term care and hospice care.  He has a particular interest in psychopharmacology, nutritional psychiatry, and alternative treatment options involving particular vitamins, dietary supplements, and administering auricular acupuncture.

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Sours: https://addictionresource.com/drugs/hydrocodone/pill-identifier/

Tizanidine Hydrochloride Tablets 2 mg and 4 mg

Other Adverse Events Observed During the Evaluation of Tizanidine

Tizanidine was administered to patients in additional clinical studies where adverse event information was available. The conditions and duration of exposure varied greatly, and included (in overlapping categories) double-blind and open-label studies, uncontrolled and controlled studies, inpatient and outpatient studies, and titration studies. Untoward events associated with this exposure were recorded by clinical investigators using terminology of their own choosing. Consequently, it is not possible to provide a meaningful estimate of the proportion of individuals experiencing adverse events without first grouping similar types of untoward events into a smaller number of standardized event categories.

In the tabulations that follow, reported adverse events were classified using a standard COSTART-based dictionary terminology. The frequencies presented, therefore, represent the proportion of the patients exposed to tizanidine who experienced an event of the type cited on at least one occasion while receiving tizanidine. All reported events are included except those already listed in Table 1. If the COSTART term for an event was so general as to be uninformative, it was replaced with a more informative term. It is important to emphasize that, although the events reported occurred during treatment with tizanidine, they were not necessarily caused by it.

Events are further characterized by body system and listed in order of decreasing frequency according to the following definitions: frequent adverse events are those occurring on one or more occasions in at least 1/ patients (only those not already listed in the tabulated results from placebo-controlled studies appear in this listing); infrequent adverse events are those occurring in 1/ to 1/ patients.

Body as a Whole: Frequent: fever; Infrequent: allergic reaction, moniliasis, malaise, abscess, neck pain, sepsis, cellulitis, death, overdose; Rare: carcinoma, congenital anomaly, suicide attempt.

Cardiovascular System: Infrequent: vasodilatation, postural hypotension, syncope, migraine, arrhythmia; Rare: angina pectoris, coronary artery disorder, heart failure, myocardial infarct, phlebitis, pulmonary embolus, ventricular extrasystoles, ventricular tachycardia.

Digestive System: Frequent: abdomen pain, diarrhea, dyspepsia; Infrequent: dysphagia, cholelithiasis, fecal impaction, flatulence, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, hepatitis, melena; Rare: gastroenteritis, hematemesis, hepatoma, intestinal obstruction, liver damage.

Hemic and Lymphatic System: Infrequent: ecchymosis, hypercholesteremia, anemia, hyperlipemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, sepsis; Rare: petechia, purpura, thrombocythemia, thrombocytopenia.

Metabolic and Nutritional System: Infrequent: edema, hypothyroidism, weight loss; Rare: adrenal cortex insufficiency, hyperglycemia, hypokalemia, hyponatremia, hypoproteinemia, respiratory acidosis.

Musculoskeletal System: Frequent: myasthenia, back pain; Infrequent: pathological fracture, arthralgia, arthritis, bursitis.

Nervous System: Frequent: depression, anxiety, paresthesia; Infrequent: tremor, emotional lability, convulsion, paralysis, thinking abnormal, vertigo, abnormal dreams, agitation, depersonalization, euphoria, migraine, stupor, dysautonomia, neuralgia; Rare: dementia, hemiplegia, neuropathy.

Respiratory System: Infrequent: sinusitis, pneumonia, bronchitis; Rare: asthma.

Skin and Appendages: Frequent: rash, sweating, skin ulcer; Infrequent: pruritus, dry skin, acne, alopecia, urticaria; Rare: exfoliative dermatitis, herpes simplex, herpes zoster, skin carcinoma.

Special Senses: Infrequent: ear pain, tinnitus, deafness, glaucoma, conjunctivitis, eye pain, optic neuritis, otitis media, retinal hemorrhage, visual field defect; Rare: iritis, keratitis, optic atrophy.

Urogenital System: Infrequent: urinary urgency, cystitis, menorrhagia, pyelonephritis, urinary retention, kidney calculus, uterine fibroids enlarged, vaginal moniliasis, vaginitis; Rare: albuminuria, glycosuria, hematuria, metrorrhagia.

Sours: https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/fda/fdaDrugXsl.cfm?setid=43d51c1d-5f5b-4b9ed0-d12ceff8d84e&type=display

E 34 pill white

Clonazepam vs. Xanax: Is There a Difference?

Overview

Anxiety disorders can cause emotional and physical symptoms that can disrupt your everyday life. Emotional symptoms of anxiety disorders include feelings of fear, apprehension, and irritability. Among the physical symptoms are:

Anxiety disorders can be treated, though. Treatment usually requires a combination of methods, including medication.

To treat your anxiety, your doctor may recommend clonazepam or Xanax.

How they work

Clonazepam is a generic drug. It’s also sold as the brand-name drug Klonopin. Xanax, on the other hand, is a brand-name version of the drug alprazolam. Both clonazepam and Xanax are central nervous system (CNS) depressants and are classified as benzodiazepines.

Benzodiazepines affect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a key chemical messenger in your brain. These drugs cause nerve impulses throughout your body to slow down, leading to a calming effect.

What they treat

Both drugs treat anxiety disorders, including panic attacks in adults. Clonazepam also treats seizures in adults and children. The effectiveness and safety of Xanax has not been established in children, on the other hand.

The effects of both clonazepam and Xanax may be more powerful or longer lasting in older people.

Forms and dosage

Clonazepam comes in an oral tablet, which you swallow. It also comes in an oral disintegrating tablet, which dissolves in your mouth. You can take clonazepam one to three times per day, as directed by your doctor.

Xanax comes in immediate-release and extended-release oral tablets. The generic version, alprazolam, also comes as an oral solution. Your doctor may direct you to take the immediate-release tablet several times per day. The oral solution is also an immediate-release form. You will take it several times per day. The extended-release tablet only needs to be taken once per day.

For either medication, your doctor will probably start you off with the lowest possible dosage. If necessary, you doctor can increase the dosage in small increments.

Both drugs may begin working within hours or days of the first dose. A dose of Xanax will affect you for a few hours. The effect of clonazepam lasts about two or three times as long.

Strengths

Cost

How much you’ll pay for a prescription drug can vary depending on where you live, your pharmacy, and your health insurance plan. Generally speaking, generic versions are significantly less expensive than brand name versions. That means clonazepam will likely be cheaper than Xanax.

Side effects

There are a lot of potential side effects of benzodiazepines, but you’re unlikely to have more than a few. For most people, the side effects are mild and tolerable. They usually occur early on and subside as your body gets used to the drug.

The most common side effects are light-headedness and drowsiness. These can impair your ability to drive. If you feel lightheaded or sleepy while taking either of these drugs, don’t drive or operate dangerous equipment.

It’s possible to have an allergic reaction to both clonazepam and Xanax. Symptoms of an allergic reaction include hives, itching, or skin rash. If you develop swelling of the face, tongue, or throat or trouble breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

Interactions

Taking other CNS depressants with clonazepam or Xanax can intensify their intended effects. Mixing these substances is dangerous and can cause loss of consciousness. In some cases, it can be fatal.

Other CNS depressants include:

  • sedatives and sleeping pills
  • tranquilizers and mood stabilizers
  • muscle relaxants
  • seizure medications
  • prescription pain medications
  • alcohol
  • marijuana
  • antihistamines

You can find detailed lists of interacting substances for both drugs in the interactions for Xanax and clonazepam.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the medications you take, including over-the-counter drugs and supplements, and ask about potentially dangerous interactions.

Talk to your doctor

Xanax is not an effective treatment for seizures. So, if you have seizures, clonazepam may be a treatment option for you.

If you’re being treated for an anxiety disorder, ask your doctor to discuss the pros and cons of each medication. It’s hard to determine in advance which medication will be most effective for you. Your doctor will recommend one based on your symptoms and medical history. If the first choice doesn’t work, you can move on to the next.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/health/mental-health/clonazepam-vs-xanax
Yu-Gi-Oh! GX- Season 1 Episode 34- The Fear Factor

tizanidine

How should I take tizanidine?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Tizanidine is usually taken up to 3 times in one day. Allow 6 to 8 hours to pass between doses. Do not take more than three doses (36 mg) in a hour period. Too much of this medicine can damage your liver.

You may take tizanidine with or without food, but take it the same way each time. Switching between taking tizanidine with food and taking it without food can make the medicine less effective or cause increased side effects.

Switching between tizanidine tablets and capsules may cause changes in side effects or how well the medicine works.

  • Taking the tablets with food can increase your blood levels of tizanidine.
  • Taking the capsules with food can decrease your blood levels of tizanidine.

If you make any changes in how you take tizanidine, tell your doctor if you notice any change in side effects or in how well the medicine works.

Tizanidine is a short-acting medication, and its effects will be most noticeable between 1 and 3 hours after you take it. You should take tizanidine only for daily activities that require relief from muscle spasms.

You will need frequent medical tests.

If you stop using tizanidine suddenly after long-term use, you may have withdrawal symptoms such as dizziness, fast heartbeats, tremors, and anxiety. Ask your doctor how to safely stop using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Sours: https://www.cigna.com/individuals-families/health-wellness/hw/medications/tizanidine-da1

You will also like:

tizanidine

What is the most important information I should know about tizanidine?

You should not take tizanidine if you are also taking fluvoxamine or ciprofloxacin.

Do not use tizanidine at a time when you need muscle tone for safe balance and movement during certain activities.

What is tizanidine?

Tizanidine is a muscle relaxer that is used to treat spasticity by temporarily relaxing muscle tone.

Tizanidine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking tizanidine?

You should not use tizanidine if you are allergic to it, or if:

  • you also take the antidepressant fluvoxamine (Luvox); or
  • you also take the antibiotic ciprofloxacin (Cipro).

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • liver disease;
  • kidney disease; or
  • low blood pressure.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It may not be safe to breastfeed while using this medicine. Ask your doctor about any risk.

How should I take tizanidine?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Tizanidine is usually taken up to 3 times in one day. Allow 6 to 8 hours to pass between doses. Do not take more than three doses (36 mg) in a hour period. Too much of this medicine can damage your liver.

You may take tizanidine with or without food, but take it the same way each time. Switching between taking tizanidine with food and taking it without food can make the medicine less effective or cause increased side effects.

Switching between tizanidine tablets and capsules may cause changes in side effects or how well the medicine works.

  • Taking the tablets with food can increase your blood levels of tizanidine.
  • Taking the capsules with food can decrease your blood levels of tizanidine.

If you make any changes in how you take tizanidine, tell your doctor if you notice any change in side effects or in how well the medicine works.

Tizanidine is a short-acting medication, and its effects will be most noticeable between 1 and 3 hours after you take it. You should take tizanidine only for daily activities that require relief from muscle spasms.

You will need frequent medical tests.

If you stop using tizanidine suddenly after long-term use, you may have withdrawal symptoms such as dizziness, fast heartbeats, tremors, and anxiety. Ask your doctor how to safely stop using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at

Overdose symptoms may include weakness, drowsiness, confusion, slow heart rate, shallow breathing, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking tizanidine?

Do not use tizanidine at a time when you need muscle tone for safe balance and movement during certain activities. In some situations, it may be dangerous for you to have reduced muscle tone.

Drinking alcohol with this medicine can cause side effects.

Avoid driving or hazardous activity until you know how this medicine will affect you. Your reactions could be impaired. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy.

What other drugs will affect tizanidine?

Taking tizanidine with other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can cause dangerous side effects or death. Ask your doctor before using opioid medication, a sleeping pill, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety or seizures.

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

  • acyclovir;
  • ticlopidine;
  • zileuton;
  • birth control pills;
  • an antibiotic --ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, or ofloxacin;
  • blood pressure medicine --clonidine, guanfacine, methyldopa;
  • heart rhythm medicine --amiodarone, mexiletine, propafenone, verapamil; or
  • stomach acid medicine --cimetidine, famotidine.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect tizanidine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about tizanidine.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

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