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AMD Ryzen 2nd Generation release date, news and features: everything you need to know

Intel used to be the de facto king of the CPU world, designing the best processors out there – hands down. However, with AMD Ryzen, everything changed. These days, AMD is dominating the market with not just AMD Ryzen 2nd Generation and Threadripper 2nd Generation, but also its recently released Ryzen 3rd Generation. In fact, AMD has more than doubled Intel’s sales, according to a German retailer.

As far as this generation goes, however, we’ve been able to put a wide range of Ryzen 2nd Generation processors to the test, from the Ryzen 5 2600X to the powerhouse Ryzen 7 2700X, we know AMD isn’t pulling any punches when it comes to power and value.

There were rumors of a Ryzen 7 2800X, which might have given the recent Coffee Lake Refresh processors a run for their money – but, with the advent of AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation, announced at Computex 2019 and released July 7th, 2019, we doubt that particular processor will ever surface.

Additionally, AMD has brought Zen 2 to the mainstream, the architecture behind the 3rd generation of Ryzen. And, according to the latest rumors, we could see up to 16-cores on the flagship, and clock speeds up to 5.0GHz. If there’s any weight to this, the processor world will shake when these next-gen chunks of silicon drop sometime in 2019.

Microsoft has also announced that its next-generation Xbox console, known as Project Scarlett, will utilize a custom-designed SoC based on Zen 2.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? AMD's upgraded, budget-friendly processor chips
  • When is it out? Out now
  • What will it cost?  $199 (about £140, AU$260) starting price for the Ryzen 5 2600

AMD Ryzen 2nd Generation release date

The first-generation Ryzen processors launched in March 2017 and continued to roll out throughout 2017. Ryzen 2nd Generation chips launched at around the same time the following year, on April 19, 2018, after being made available for pre-order a few days before.

Beyond the first few AMD Ryzen 2nd Generation chips, AMD continued to roll out some Ryzen Pro and Ryzen Threadripper chips through the rest of 2018. Ryzen Pro chips are designed for business and IT use cases, with up to 8-cores and 16-threads. Ryzen Threadripper 2nd Generation, the ‘big daddy’ of AMD’s 2nd gen offerings with up to 32 cores, is for die hard creative types.

AMD also announced a Ryzen 5 2500X and Ryzen 3 2300X, but at this point we don’t expect to see these mid-range chips make it to market. Intel’s Coffee Lake Refresh has been out for a while now, and Ryzen 3rd Generation chips have also hit the streets, having been announced at Computex 2019.

Even though AMD Ryzen 3rd Generation have been released, AMD may be releasing 50th anniversary editions of some of its parts, including the beloved Ryzen 7 2700X.

AMD Ryzen 2nd Generation price

AMD made its second generation of Ryzen chips to be just as affordable as the first batch. Granted, offering more reasonably priced CPUs has always been AMD's edge. However, for the first time in years, the cheaper Ryzen chips could truly compete with, if not surpass, Intel's offerings.

AMD has decided to continue its course with the 2nd Generation models. It was important that it delivered affordable, high-performing CPUs. And, the price tags we’ve seen for the mid-range chips keep in line with the pricing for the first generation.

  • AMD Ryzen 7 2700X: $329 (£329, AU$509) 
  • AMD Ryzen 7 2700:  $299 (£279, AU$419) 
  • AMD Ryzen 5 2600X: $229 (£209, AU$338) 
  • AMD Ryzen 5 2600: $199 (£179, AU$259) 

In 2017, the quad-core Ryzen 3 1300X debuted at $129 (£112, AU$169), while Intel's Core i3 7350K went for $149 (£169, AU$299). Bump up to the hexa-core Ryzen 5 1600X, and we saw it offered for $249 (£249, AU$359) – compare that to the quad-core Intel Core i5-7600K at $239 (£219, AU$339), although you drop a couple of cores in the process.

We saw the biggest difference in price with the Ryzen 7 1800X, which at $499 (£500, around AU$650) was almost half the price of Intel's Core i7-5960X/6900K. Of course, this lead Intel to introduce a more affordable Intel Core i7-8700K and Intel Core i7-7820X. Meanwhile, the AMD Threadripper 1950X came in at $999 (£999, AU$1,439) and delivered even stronger performance than Intel's like-priced Core i9-7900X.

Of course, AMD had slashed its Ryzen prices across the board when they announced the 2nd Generation, keeping things competitive with Intel as the two companies fight for your CPU-buying dollars.

AMD Ryzen 2nd Generation specs

Ryzen 2nd generation processors offer an impressive generational leap over their predecessors. They're built using an updated 12-nanometer process, which will pack in even more transistors and thus provide more raw speed along the way.

According to AMD 12nm process results in an approximately 16% performance increase and 11% better lower power draw over the original Ryzen's 14nm process.

We finally came across rumors swirling around about the Ryzen 2nd Generation APUs, which will succeed the Ryzen 5 2400G and Ryzen 3 2200G. According to PCGamesN, the next generation APUs should be coming out in the next year, and will feature the same Zen+ 12nm architecture as the Ryzen 2nd Generation CPUs. This could mean APUs will see a similar performance boost as we saw when the first generation Ryzen chips were superseded.

AMD states that the Ryzen 2nd Generation chips will be the smallest and fastest desktop processors to date – lofty promises. However, they’ll definitely excite PC enthusiasts and users of all stripes. Ryzen 2nd Generation chips should deliver higher clock speeds and introduce the enhanced Precision Boost 2 technology to boost performance during high-drain scenarios.

And, now that we’ve been able to play with the Ryzen 7 2700X and the Ryzen 5 2600X, we know that AMD has succeeded in pushing its specs. The 2700X with its 8-cores, 16-threads and speedy boost clock of 4.3GHz outperforms the Intel Core i7-8700K, AMD has fully embraced the enthusiast market. Even the lower-end Ryzen 5 2600X pushes performance into the next generation with 6-cores, 12-threads and a 4.2 GHz boost clock.

We also saw leaked benchmarks for the Ryzen 3 2300X and Ryzen 5 2500X. The former is a four-core, four-thread processor clocked at 3.5GHz and a 4.0GHz boost clock. Meanwhile the Ryzen 5 2500X is a four-core, eight-thread chip, featuring a 3.6GHz core clock, boosting up to 4.0GHz.

Since these chips came out, they’ve been excellent entry-level and mid-range options, respectively, but seem to only be available in prebuilt systems.

We also saw a leak from ASRock pointing to the existence of some low-power E-series Ryzen 2nd Generation chips, the Ryzen 5 2600E and Ryzen 7 2700E. These chips will have a much lower 45W TDP and feature an 8-core design for the Ryzen 7, and 6-cores for the Ryzen 5 – according to the rumor reported by Wccftech. These rumors have since been proven true when they both launched in September of 2018.

However, it doesn’t stop with the desktop chips. AMD has also rolled out Ryzen 2nd Generation mobile chips in the Ryzen 7 2700U, Ryzen 5 2500U, Ryzen 3 2300U and Ryzen 3 2200U. These all have Vega graphics packed in, which means you can do some light gaming on them. The two higher-end chips are four-core, eight-thread processors with boost clocks of 3.8GHz and 3.6GHz for the Ryzen 7 and Ryzen 5, respectively.

The Ryzen 3 2300U and 2200U are four-core, four-thread chips with 3.4GHz boost clocks. The main difference between these two chips is that the former features stronger Vega graphics, while the 2200U has a higher base clock of 2.5GHz.

AMD Ryzen 2nd Generation is the culmination of everything AMD wanted to do with Ryzen. And, if the specs of the Ryzen 2nd Generation CPUs are anything to go off of, we’re very excited about what this lineup can do.

AMD has a very technical primer on Precision Boost 2 from its Ryzen Mobile Processor with Radeon Vega Graphics, in case you want to dig into the specs.

We've seen some SenseMi improvements in AMD's recent Ryzen-based desktop APUs, so it stands to reason that there are similar performance and efficiency increases in the Ryzen 2nd Generation line. That could include optimized power usage through Pure Power smart sensors and improved overclocking potential from Extended Frequency Range 2.

Anyone wanting to upgrade from Ryzen Gen 1 should be happy to know that AMD has kept the same AM4 socket intact, so you don’t have to buy a new motherboard to slot one of these CPUs into your machine. There is also an enhanced X470 chipset that’s optimized for Ryzen 2nd Generation with lower power consumption.

Keep in mind that AMD calls the heart of Ryzen 2nd Generation the Zen+ architecture, rather than Zen 2. What’s the difference? Well, Zen 2 is a completely new architecture built on a 7nm process, which – as you can imagine – offers a world of difference when it comes to power and performance.

AMD's roadmap shows the Zen 2 and Zen 3 (listed at "7nm+") cores coming somewhere between the release of the Zen+ and the year 2020, which we expected to appear in 2019. And it looks like Zen 2 has arrived along with Ryzen’s 3rd generation.

Zen 2 design is, naturally, complete at this point, and it "improves on Zen in multiple dimensions" according to AMD. And the Zen 3 is "on track," as well. AMD could be primed to shake up the CPU industry all over again with the Zen 2. However, Zen+ is what's powering the Ryzen 2nd Gen chips.

Even so, there are many reasons to be excited for the Ryzen 2nd Generation chips, especially if you’re in the market for a PC upgrade this year. And, even with Intel on the defensive, it’s safe to say that AMD has knocked it out of the park.

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/news/amd-ryzen-2nd-generation

Ryzen

AMD brand for microprocessors

"Threadripper" redirects here. For the sewing tool, see Seam ripper.

AMD ryzen stylized.svg
LaunchedFebruary 2017 (released March 2, 2017)[1]
Marketed byAdvanced Micro Devices
Designed byAdvanced Micro Devices
Common manufacturer(s)
Max. CPUclock rate3.0 GHz to 4.9 GHz
Min. feature size14 nm to 7 nm
MicroarchitectureZen
Zen+
Zen 2
Zen 3
Instruction setMain processor:
x86-64
MMX(+), SSE1, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4a, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, AVX, AVX2, FMA3, CVT16/F16C, ABM, BMI1, BMI2
AES, CLMUL, RDRAND, SHA, SME
AMD-V, AMD-Vi
AMD Secure Processor:
ARM A5
Transistors
  • 4.8 billion for Zen & Zen+ (per 14/12 nm 8-core "Zeppelin" die)[1]

    5.89 billion (1× CCD) or
    9.69 billion (2× CCD) for Zen 2
    (3.8 billion per 7 nm 8-core "CCD" & 2.09 billion for the 12 nm "I/O die")[2]

    6.24 billion (1x CCD) or
    10.39 billion (2x CCD) for Zen 3
    (4.15 billion per 7 nm 8-core "CCD" & 2.09 billion for the same 12 nm "I/O die")[3]
Cores
Socket(s)
PredecessorFX

Ryzen (RY-zən)[7] is a brand[8] of x86-64microprocessors designed and marketed by Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) for desktop, mobile, server, and embedded platforms based on the Zen microarchitecture. It consists of central processing units (CPUs) marketed for mainstream, enthusiast, server, and workstation segments and accelerated processing units (APUs) marketed for mainstream and entry-level segments and embedded systems applications.

AMD officially announced a new series of processors, named "Ryzen", during its New Horizon summit on December 13, 2016 and introduced Ryzen 1000 series processors in February 2017, featuring up to 8 cores and 16 threads, which launched on March 2, 2017.[9] The second generation of Ryzen processors, the Ryzen 2000 series, features the Zen+ microarchitecture, an incremental improvement built on a 12 nm process technology from GlobalFoundries, was released in April 2018 and featured a marginal 10% total aggregate performance increase (3% IPC, 6% frequency, 10% overall[10]) over Ryzen 1000 processors[11] that first released in 2017.[12] The third generation of Ryzen processors launched on July 7, 2019 and based on AMD's Zen 2 architecture, features more significant design improvements with a 15% IPC boost[13] and a further shrink to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company's (TSMC) 7 nm first generation process. On June 16, 2020, AMD announced new Ryzen 3000 series XT processors with 4% higher boost clocks versus non XT processors.[14] On October 8, 2020, AMD announced the highly anticipated Zen 3 architecture for their Ryzen 5000 series processors, featuring a 19% instructions per cycle (IPC) improvement over Zen 2, while being built on the same 7nm TSMC node with reported 5GHz[15] boost operating frequencies in the wild.[16] With the launch of Zen 3 via the Ryzen 5000 series, AMD has taken the gaming performance crown from Intel, and is an important performance milestone in itself as gaming performance is based on single thread performance[17] above all else.[18]

A majority of AMD's consumer Ryzen products use the Socket AM4 platform. In August 2017, AMD launched their Ryzen Threadripper line aimed at the enthusiast workstation market. AMD Ryzen Threadripper uses the larger TR4, sTRX4, and sWRX8 sockets, which support additional memory channels and PCI Express lanes.

In December 2019, AMD started producing first generation Ryzen products built using the second generation Zen+ architecture.[19] The most notable example is Ryzen 5 1600, with newest batches, having "AF" identifier instead of its usual "AE", being essentially a rebadged Ryzen 5 2600 with the same specifications as the original Ryzen 5 1600.

History[edit]

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X top and pins

Ryzen and the fundamental "Zen" CPU microarchitecture it uses were especially significant for AMD since it was a completely new, "from scratch" design and marked the corporation's return to the high-end CPU market after a decade of near-total absence since 2006, the launch of Intel Core in the DDR2 era.[20] This is because AMD's primary competitor Intel had largely dominated this market segment starting from the 2006 release of their Core microarchitecture (marketed as "Core 2"), after abandoning the Pentium 4's extremely uncompetitive (with AMD's Athlon XP and Athlon 64) Netburst microarchitecture for an upgraded version of the prior Pentium 3, which notably continues to underpin Intel's CPU designs to this very day.[21]

Until Ryzen's initial launch in the spring of 2017, Intel's market dominance over AMD would only continue to increase as simultaneously with the above top-to-bottom launch of the now famous "Intel Core" CPU lineup and branding, was the successful roll out of their well known "tick-tock" CPU release strategy. This then brand new release strategy was most famous for alternating between a new CPU microarchitecture and a new fabrication node each and every year; with it being something that over time would eventually become a release cadence they'd manage to stick to for almost an entire decade (specifically lasting from Intel Core's initial summer 2006 launch with 65 nm Conroe, all the way until the 14 nm Broadwell desktop CPUs were delayed a year from a planned 2014 launch out to summer 2015 instead. This would necessitate a refresh of their pre-existing 22 nm Haswell CPU lineup instead, and thus officially end "tick-tock" as a practice).[22][23] And it's for these same exact reasons that this became incredibly important for AMD, as Intel's inability to further sustain "tick-tock" past around 2014 would prove absolutely critical, if not outright essential in providing both the initial and continually growing market openings for their Ryzen CPUs and the Zen CPU microarchitecture in general to succeed.

Also of note is the release of AMD's Bulldozer microarchitecture in 2011, which despite being a clean sheet CPU design like Zen, had been optimized for parallel computing above all else, which was then still very much in its infancy (which led to starkly inferior real-world performance in any workload that wasn't highly threaded) and thus ended up uncompetitive in basically every area outside of raw multithreading and its use in low power APUs with integrated Radeon graphics.[24] Despite a die shrink and several revisions of the Bulldozer architecture, performance and power efficiency failed to catch up with Intel's competing products.[25] Cumulatively, all of this practically forced AMD to abandon the entire high-end CPU market (including desktop, laptops, and server/enterprise) until Ryzen's release in spring 2017.

Ryzen is the consumer-level implementation of the newer Zen microarchitecture, a complete redesign that marked the return of AMD to the high-end CPU market, offering a product stack able to compete with Intel at every level.[26][27] Having more processing cores, Ryzen processors offer greater multi-threaded performance at the same price point relative to Intel's Core processors.[28] The Zen architecture delivers more than 52% improvement in instructions per cycle (clock) over the prior-generation Bulldozer AMD core, without raising power use.[29] The changes to instruction set also makes it binary-compatible with Intel's Broadwell, smoothing the transition for users.[30]

Threadripper, which is geared for high performance desktops (HEDT), wasn't developed as part of a business plan or a specific roadmap; instead, a small enthusiast team inside AMD saw an opportunity that something could be developed between the Ryzen and Epyc CPU roadmaps that would put the crown of performance on AMD. After some progress was made in their spare time, the project was greenlit and put in an official roadmap by 2016.[31]

Since the release of Ryzen, AMD's CPU market share has increased while Intel's appears to have stagnated and/or regressed.[32]

Features[edit]

CPUs[edit]

CPU features table

APUs[edit]

APU features table

Product lineup[edit]

Ryzen 1000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

  • Socket AM4 for Ryzen and Socket TR4 for Ryzen Threadripper.[33][34]
  • Based on first generation Zen. Ryzen CPUs based on Summit Ridge architecture. Threadripper based on Whitehaven architecture.
  • 4.8 billion transistors per 192 mm2[35] 8-core "Zeppelin" die[1] with one die being used for Ryzen and two for Ryzen Threadripper.
  • Stepping: B1[36]
  • Memory support:
    • Ryzen dual-channel: DDR4–2666 ×2 single rank, DDR4–2400 ×2 dual rank, DDR4–2133 ×4 single rank, or DDR4–1866 ×4 dual rank.[33][37]
    • Ryzen Threadripper quad-channel: DDR4–2666 ×4 single rank, DDR4–2400 ×4 dual rank, DDR4–2133 ×8 single rank, or DDR4–1866 ×8 dual rank.
  • Instructions Sets: x87, MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, AES, CLMUL, AVX, AVX2, FMA3, CVT16/F16C, ABM, BMI1, BMI2, SHA.[30]
  • All Ryzen-branded CPUs (except Pro variants) feature unlocked multipliers.
  • AMD's SenseMI Technology monitors the processor continuously and uses Infinity Control Fabric to offer the following features:[33][38][39]
    • Pure Power reduces the entire ramp of processor voltage and clock speed, for light loads.
    • Precision Boost increases the processor voltage and clock speed by 100–200 MHz if three or more cores are active (five or more, in the case of Threadripper, and by 300 MHz); and significantly further when less than three are active (less than five, in the case of Threadripper).[40]
    • XFR (eXtended Frequency Range) aims to maintain the average clock speed closer to the maximum Precision Boost, when sufficient cooling is available.[41]
    • Neural Net Prediction and Smart Prefetch use perceptron based neural branch prediction inside the processor to optimize instruction workflow and cache management.
  • Ryzen launched in conjunction with a line of stock coolers for Socket AM4: the Wraith Stealth, Wraith Spire and Wraith Max. This line succeeds the original AMD Wraith cooler, which was released in mid-2016.[42] The Wraith Stealth is a bundled low-profile unit meant for the lower-end CPUs with a rating for a TDP of 65 W, whereas the Wraith Spire is the bundled mainstream cooler with a TDP rating of 95 W, along with optional RGB lighting on certain models. The Wraith Max is a larger cooler incorporating heatpipes, rated at 140W TDP.
Model Release date
and price
FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocketPCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)
Memory support[ii]TDP
Base PBO

XFR[43]
L1L2L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 1200[44]July 27, 2017
US $109
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD4 (4) 2 × 2 3.1 3.4
(3.1)
3.45 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 4 MB
per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 1200 [45]July 27, 2017
OEM
3.1 3.4
(?)
?
Ryzen 3 Pro 1300 [46]July 27, 2017
OEM
3.5 3.7
(?)
?
Ryzen 3 1300X[47]July 27, 2017
US $129
3.5 3.7
(3.5)
3.9
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 1400 [48]April 11, 2017
US $169
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD4 (8) 2 × 2 3.2 3.4
(3.4)
3.45 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 4 MB
per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 1500 [49]April 11, 2017
OEM
3.5 3.7
(?)
? 2 × 8 MB
per CCX
Ryzen 5 1500X[50]April 11, 2017
US $189
3.5 3.7
(3.6)
3.9
Ryzen 5 1600 [51]April 11, 2017
US $219
6 (12) 2 × 3 3.2 3.6
(3.4)
3.7
Ryzen 5 Pro 1600 [52]April 11, 2017
OEM
3.2 3.6
(?)
?
Ryzen 5 1600X [53]April 11, 2017
US $249
3.6 4.0
(3.7)
4.1 95 W
Performance
Ryzen 7 1700 [54]March 2, 2017
US $329
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD8 (16) 2 × 4 3.0 3.7
(3.2)
3.75 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 8 MB
per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 7 Pro 1700 [55]March 2, 2017
OEM
3.0 3.8
(?)
?
Ryzen 7 1700X [56]March 2, 2017
US $399
3.4 3.8
(3.5)
3.9 95 W
Ryzen 7 1800X [57]March 2, 2017
US $499
3.6 4.0
(3.7)
4.1
High-end desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 1900X [58]August 31, 2017
US $549
GloFo
14LP
2 × CCD[iii]8 (16) 2 × 4 3.8 4.0
(3.9)
4.2 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 8 MB
per CCX
TR464 (60+4) DDR4-2667
quad-channel
180 W
Ryzen Threadripper 1920X [59]August 10, 2017
US $799
12 (24) 4 × 3 3.5 4.0 4.2 4 × 8 MB
per CCX
Ryzen Threadripper 1950X [60]August 10, 2017
US $999
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.4 4.0
(3.7)
4.2
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX
  2. ^Official Support per AMD. CPU's are unlocked for different memory speeds.
  3. ^Processor package actually contains two additional inactive dies to provide structural support to the integrated heat spreader.

Ryzen 2000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

The first Ryzen 2000 CPUs, based on the 12 nm Zen+ microarchitecture, were announced for preorder on April 13, 2018[61] and launched six days later. Zen+ based Ryzen CPUs are based on Pinnacle Ridge architecture,[62] while Threadripper CPUs are based on the Colfax microarchitecture. The first of the 2000 series of Ryzen Threadripper products, introducing Precision Boost Overdrive technology,[41] followed in August. The Ryzen 7 2700X was bundled with the new Wraith Prism cooler.

Model Release date
and price
FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core Config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocketPCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)
Memory
support
TDP
Base PB2L1L2L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 1200 AF
(12 nm refresh)[63]
April, 2020
US $60
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD4 (4) 1 × 4 3.1 3.4 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 2300X [64]September 10, 2018
OEM
3.5 4.0
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 2500X [65]September 10, 2018
OEM
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD4 (8) 1 × 4 3.6 4.0 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 2600E [66]September 2018
OEM
6 (12) 2 × 3 3.1 4.0 16 MB
8 MB per CCX
DDR4-2667
dual-channel
45 W
Ryzen 5 1600 AF
(12 nm refresh)[67]
October 11, 2019
US $85
3.2 3.6 DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 2600 [68]April 19, 2018
US $199
3.4 3.9
Ryzen 5 2600X [69]April 19, 2018
US $229
3.6 4.2 95 W
November 23, 2018
UK £221.99
Performance
Ryzen 7 2700E [70]September 11, 2018
OEM
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD8 (16) 2 × 4 2.8 4.0 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
45 W
Ryzen 7 2700 [71]April 19, 2018
US $299
3.2 4.1 DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
November 23, 2018
UK £285.49
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700 [72]April 2018
OEM
3.2 4.1
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700X [73]September 6, 2018
OEM
3.6 4.1 95 W
Ryzen 7 2700X [74]April 19, 2018
US $329
3.7 4.3 105 W
High-end desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 2920X [75]October 2018
US $649
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
2 × CCD12 (24) 4 × 3 3.5 4.3 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
8 MB per CCX
TR464 (60+4) DDR4-2933
quad-channel
180 W
Ryzen Threadripper 2950X [76]August 31, 2018
US $899
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.5 4.4
Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX [77]October 2018
US $1299
4 × CCD24 (48) 8 × 3 3.0 4.2 64 MB
8 MB per CCX
250 W
Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX [78]August 13, 2018
US $1799
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.0 4.2
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX

APUs[edit]

See also: AMD Accelerated Processing Unit

Desktop[edit]

In January 2018, AMD announced the first two Ryzen desktop APUs with integrated Radeon Vega graphics under the Raven Ridge codename. These were based on first generation Zen architecture. The Ryzen 3 2200G and the Ryzen 5 2400G were released in February.[79]

Mobile[edit]

In May 2017, AMD demonstrated a Ryzen mobile APU with four Zen CPU cores and Radeon Vega-based GPU.[88] The first Ryzen mobile APUs, codenamed Raven Ridge, were officially released in October 2017.[89]

  • 4.95 billion[90] transistors on a 210 mm2 die,[90] based on a modified 14 nm Zeppelin die where four of the cores are replaced by an integrated fifth-generation GCN-based GPU.
  • Precision Boost 2[62]
  • 16 external PCIe 3.0 lanes (four each to chipset and M.2 socket; eight to a PCIe slot). 16 internal PCIe 3.0 lanes for the integrated GPU and on-board input/output (I/O).[citation needed] In 2019, AMD released some new dual core Zen mobile parts branded as 300 or 3000, codenamed Dali.
Model Release
date
FabCPU GPU SocketPCIe lanes Memory supportTDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel Config[i]Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[ii]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 2200U[91]January 8, 2018 GloFo
14LP
2 (4) 2.5 3.4 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB Vega 3 192:12:4
3 CU [92]
1100 MHz 422.4 FP5 12 (8+4) DDR4-2400
dual-channel
12–25 W
Ryzen 3 3200U[93]January 6, 2019 2.6 3.5 1200 MHz 460.8
Ryzen 3 2300U[94]January 8, 2018 4 (4) 2.0 3.4 Vega 6 384:24:8
6 CU [95]
1100 MHz 844.8
Ryzen 3 Pro 2300U[96]May 15, 2018 [97]
Ryzen 5 2500U[98]October 26, 2017[98]4 (8) 3.6 Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU [99]
1126.4
Ryzen 5 Pro 2500U[100]May 15, 2018 [97]
Ryzen 5 2600H[101]September 10, 2018[102]3.2 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35–54 W
Ryzen 7 2700U[103]October 26, 2017[103]2.2 3.8 Vega 10 640:40:16
10 CU [104]
1300 MHz 1664 DDR4-2400
dual-channel
12–25 W
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700U[105]May 15, 2018 [97]
Ryzen 7 2800H[101]September 10, 2018[102]3.3 Vega 11 704:44:16
11 CU
1830.4 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35–54 W
Embedded[edit]
Great Horned Owl[edit]

In February 2018, AMD announced the V1000 series of embedded Zen+ Vega APUs, based on the Great Horned Owl architecture, with four SKUs.[106]

Banded Kestrel[edit]

In April 2019, AMD announced another line of embedded Zen+Vega APUs, namely the Ryzen Embedded R1000 series with two SKUs.[108]

Ryzen 3000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

On May 27, 2019, at Computex in Taipei, AMD launched its third generation Ryzen processors which use AMD's Zen 2 architecture. For this generation's microarchitectures, Ryzen uses Matisse, while Threadripper uses Castle Peak. The chiplet design separates the CPU cores, fabricated on TSMC's 7FF process, and the I/O, fabricated on GlobalFoundries' 12 nm process, and connects them via Infinity Fabric.[110] The Ryzen 3000 series uses the AM4 socket similar to earlier models and is the first CPU to offer PCI Express 4.0 (PCIe) connectivity.[111] The new architecture offers a 15% instruction-per-clock (IPC) uplift and a reduction in energy usage. Other improvements include a doubling of the L3 cache size, a re-optimized L1 instruction cache, a larger micro-operations cache, double the floating point performance, improved branch prediction, and better instruction pre-fetching.[110] The 6-, 8- and 12-core CPUs became generally available on July 7, 2019, and 24-core processors were launched in November.[112]

The Ryzen Threadripper 3990X, part of Castle Peak generation of CPUs, has currently[when?] the world's largest number of both cores and threads available in consumer-oriented CPUs - 64 and 128, respectively.[citation needed] The competing Intel Core i9-10980XE processor has only 18 cores and 36 threads. Another competitor, the workstation-oriented Intel Xeon W-3275 and W-3275M, has 28 cores, 56 threads, and cost more when launched.[citation needed]

Model Release date
and price
FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocketPCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)[ii]
Memory
support
TDP
Base Boost L1L2L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 3100[113]April 21, 2020
$99
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
4 (8) 2 × 2 3.6 3.9 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 3300X[114]April 21, 2020
$120
1 × 4 3.8 4.3 16 MB
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 3500 November 15, 2019
OEM (West)
Japan ¥16000[115]
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
6 (6) 2 × 3 3.6 4.1 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 3500X[116]October 8, 2019
China ¥1099
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen 5 3600[117]July 7, 2019
US $199
6 (12) 3.6 4.2
Ryzen 5 Pro 3600[118]September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 5 3600X[119]July 7, 2019
US $249
3.8 4.4 95 W
Ryzen 5 3600XT[120]July 7, 2020
US $249
4.5
Performance
Ryzen 7 Pro 3700[121]September 30, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 (16) 2 × 4 3.6 4.4 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W[iii]
Ryzen 7 3700X[123]July 7, 2019
US $329
Ryzen 7 3800X[124]July 7, 2019
US $399
3.9 4.5 105 W
Ryzen 7 3800XT[125]July 7, 2020
US $399
4.7
Enthusiast
Ryzen 9 3900[126]October 8, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 3.1 4.3 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
64 MB
16 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 9 Pro 3900[127]September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 9 3900X[128]July 7, 2019
US $499
3.8 4.6 105 W[iv]
Ryzen 9 3900XT[129]July 7, 2020
US $499
4.7
Ryzen 9 3950X[130]November 25, 2019
US $749
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.5
High-End Desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 3960X[131]November 25, 2019
US $1399
TSMC
7FF
4 × CCD
1 × I/O
24 (48) 8 × 3 3.8 4.5 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
128 MB
16 MB per CCX
sTRX464 (56+8) DDR4-3200
quad-channel
280 W[v]
Ryzen Threadripper 3970X[133]November 25, 2019
US $1999
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.7 4.5
Ryzen Threadripper 3990X[134]February 7, 2020
US $3990
8 × CCD
1 × I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.9 4.3 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
Workstation
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3945WX[135]July 14, 2020
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 4.0 4.3 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
64 MB
16 MB per CCX
sWRX8 128 (120+8) DDR4-3200
octa-channel
280 W
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3955WX[136]July 14, 2020
OEM
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.9
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX[137]July 14, 2020
OEM
4 × CCD
1 × I/O
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.5 4.2 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3995WX[138]July 14, 2020
OEM
8 × CCD
1 × I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.7 4.2 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCXs) × cores per CCX
  2. ^The chipset itself provides additional user-accessible PCIe lanes and integrated PCIe devices, see AM4 chipsets.
  3. ^Ryzen 7 3700X may consume over 90 W under load.[122]
  4. ^Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 9 3950X may consume over 145 W under load.[122]
  5. ^Ryzen Threadripper 3990X may consume over 490 W under load.[132]


The 4-, 6- and 8-core processors have one core chiplet. The 12- and 16-core processors have two core chiplets. In all cases the I/O die is the same.[110]

The Threadripper 24- and 32-core processors have four core chiplets. The 64-core processor has eight core chiplets. All Threadripper processors use the same I/O die.

APUs[edit]

Both mobile and desktop APUs are based on the Picasso microarchitecture, a 12 nm refresh of Raven Ridge, offering a modest increase in clock speeds (up to an additional 300 MHz maximum boost), Precision Boost 2, an up to 3% increase in IPC from the move to the Zen+ core with its reduced cache and memory latencies, and newly added solder thermal interface material for the desktop parts.[139]

Desktop[edit]
Mobile[edit]

In 2019, AMD first released the Ryzen 3000 APUs, consisting only of quad core parts. Then in January 2020, they announced value dual core mobile parts, codenamed Dalí, including the Ryzen 3 3250U.

Ryzen 4000[edit]

APUs[edit]

The Ryzen 4000 APUs are based on Renoir, a refresh of the Zen 2 Matisse CPU cores, coupled with Radeon Vega GPU cores. They were released only to OEM manufacturers in mid-2020. Unlike Matisse, Renoir does not support PCIe 4.0.[155]

Ryzen Pro 4x50G APUs are the same as 4x00G APUs, except they are bundled a Wraith Stealth cooler and are not OEM-only.[156] It is possible this is a listing mistake, since 4x50G CPUs are unavailable on retail (as of Oct. 2020) and PRO SKUs are usually the OEM only parts.

Desktop[edit]
Mobile[edit]

Zen 2 APUs, based on the 7 nm Renoir microarchitecture, commercialized as Ryzen 4000.[158][159][160]

Model Release
date
SOC CPU GPU SocketPCIe
lanes
Memory supportTDP
FabTransistors

(million)

Die Size

(mm²)

Cores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel,
config[ii]
Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 4300U[161][162]March 16, 2020 TSMC
7FF
9,800 156 4 (4) 1 × 4 2.7 3.7 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB AMD Radeon Graphics
320:20:8
5 CU
1400 MHz 896 FP6 16 (8+4+4) DDR4-3200
LPDDR4-4266
dual-channel
10–25 W
Ryzen 3 PRO 4450U[163]May 7, 2020 4 (8) 2.5
Ryzen 5 4500U[164][165]March 16, 2020 6 (6) 2 × 3 2.3 4.0 8 MB
4 MB per CCX
AMD Radeon Graphics
384:24:8
6 CU
1500 MHz 1152
Ryzen 5 4600U[166]6 (12) 2.1
Ryzen 5 PRO 4650U[167]May 7, 2020
Ryzen 5 4680U[168]April 13, 2021 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1344
Ryzen 5 4600HS[169]March 16, 2020 3.0 AMD Radeon Graphics
384:24:8
6 CU
1152 35 W
Ryzen 5 4600H[170][171]35–54 W
Ryzen 7 4700U[172]8 (8) 2 × 4 2.0 4.1 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 10–25 W
Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U[173]May 7, 2020 8 (16) 1.7
Ryzen 7 4800U[174]March 16, 2020 1.8 4.2 AMD Radeon Graphics
512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792
Ryzen 7 4980U[175]April 13, 2021 2.0 4.4 1950 MHz 1996.8
Ryzen 7 4800HS[176]March 16, 2020 2.9 4.2 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 35 W
Ryzen 7 4800H[177][178]35–54 W
Ryzen 9 4900HS[179]3 4.3 AMD Radeon Graphics
512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792 35 W
Ryzen 9 4900H[180]3.3 4.4 35–54 W
Embedded[edit]
Grey Hawk[edit]

In November 2020, AMD announced the V2000 series of embedded Zen 2 Vega APUs.

Ryzen 5000[edit]

CPUs[edit]

The desktop Ryzen 5000 series, based on the Zen 3 microarchitecture, was announced on October 8, 2020.[184][185] They use the same 7 nm manufacturing process, which has matured slightly, as usual.[186] Mainstream Ryzen 5000 CPU cores are codenamed Vermeer. Enthusiast/workstation Threadripper 5000 CPU cores were codenamed Genesis, later renamed to Chagall.[citation needed]

  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX.

APUs[edit]

In contrast to their CPU counterparts, the APUs consist of single dies with integrated graphics and smaller caches. The APUs, codenamed Cezanne, forgo PCIe 4.0 support to keep power consumption low.[193]

Desktop[edit]
Mobile[edit]

Oddly numbered models like the 5300U, 5500U and 5700U are Zen 2 based (codename Lucienne), while 5400U, 5600U and 5800U are Zen 3 based (codename Cezanne). HX models are unlocked, allowing them to be overclocked like Intel Core i9-xxxxxHK processors. SMT is now standard across the lineup unlike the 4000-series Ryzen Mobile.

Initial reception[edit]

The first Ryzen 7 (1700, 1700X, and 1800X) processors debuted in early March 2017 and were generally well received by hardware reviewers.[224][225][226] Ryzen was the first brand new architecture from AMD in five years, and without very much initial fine-tuning or optimization, it ran generally well for reviewers.[227] Initial Ryzen chips ran well with software and games already on the market, performing exceptionally well in workstation scenarios, and well in most gaming scenarios. Compared to Piledriver-powered FX chips, Zen-powered Ryzen chips ran cooler, much faster, and used less power. IPC uplift was eventually gauged to be 52% higher than Excavator, which was two full generations ahead of the architecture still being used in AMD's FX-series desktop predecessors like the FX-8350 and FX-8370.[1] Though Zen fell short of Intel's Kaby Lake in terms of IPC, and therefore single-threaded throughput, it compensated by offering more cores to applications that can use them. Power consumption and heat emission were found to be competitive with Intel, and the included Wraith coolers were generally competitive with higher-priced aftermarket units.

Ryzen 1800X's multi-threaded performance, in some cases while using Blender or other open-source software, was around four times the performance of the FX-8370, or nearly double that of the i7 7700K.[228] One reviewer found that Ryzen chips would usually outperform competing Intel i7 processors for a fraction of the price when all eight cores are used.[228]

However, one complaint among a subset of reviewers was that Ryzen processors lagged their Intel counterparts when running older games, or some newer games at mainstream resolutions such as 720p or 1080p.[229] AMD acknowledged the gaming performance deficit at low resolutions during a Reddit "Ask Me Anything" thread, where it explained that updates and patches were being developed.[230] Subsequent updates to Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Rise of the Tomb Raider increased frame rates by 17–31% on Ryzen systems.[231][232] In April 2017, developer id Software announced that, in the future, its games would exploit the greater parallelism available on Ryzen CPUs.[233]

It has been suggested that low threaded applications often result in Ryzen processors being underused, yielding lower than expected benchmark scores, because Zen relies on its core count to make up for its lower IPC rating than that of Kaby Lake.[234][235][236] However, AMD and others have argued thread scheduling is not the fundamental issue to Windows 10 performance.[238] Early AM4 motherboards were also hindered by BIOS bugs and poor DDR4 memory support.[citation needed]

Operating system support[edit]

Windows[edit]

AMD verified that computers with Ryzen CPUs can boot Windows 7 and Windows 8 both 64- and 32-bit but on newer hardware, including AMD Ryzen and Intel Kaby Lake and later, Microsoft only officially supports the use of Windows 10. Windows Update blocks updates from being installed on newer systems running older versions of Windows, though that restriction can be circumvented with an unofficial patch.[239]

Although AMD initially announced that Ryzen chipset drivers would not be provided for Windows 7,[240] its chipset driver packages do in fact list and include them.[241]

As of June 2021, 1st Generation Ryzen CPUs, (including the newer Zen+ "AF" version) are not supported on upcoming Windows 11.[242][243]

Linux[edit]

Full support for Ryzen processors' performance features in Linux requires kernel version 4.10 or newer.[244]

Known issues[edit]

Spectre[edit]

Like nearly all modern high performance microprocessors, Ryzen was susceptible to the "Spectre" vulnerabilities. The vulnerabilities can be mitigated without hardware changes via microcode updates and operating system workarounds, but the mitigations incur a performance penalty.[245]

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Zen 2

2019 AMD 7-nanometre processor microarchitecture

Zen 2 is a computer processormicroarchitecture by AMD. It is the successor of AMD's Zen and Zen+ microarchitectures, and is fabricated on the 7 nanometerMOSFET node from TSMC. The microarchitecture powers the third generation of Ryzen processors, known as Ryzen 3000 for the mainstream desktop chips (codename "Matisse"), Ryzen 4000U/H (codename "Renoir") and Ryzen 5000U (codename "Lucienne") for mobile applications, as Threadripper 3000 for high-end desktop systems,[4][5] and as Ryzen 4000G for accelerated processing units (APUs). The Ryzen 3000 series CPUs were released on 7 July 2019,[6][7] while the Zen 2-based Epyc server CPUs (codename "Rome") were released on 7 August 2019.[8] An additional chip, the Ryzen 9 3950X, was released in November 2019.[6]

At CES 2019, AMD showed a Ryzen third-generation engineering sample that contained one chiplet with eight cores and 16 threads.[4] AMD CEO Lisa Su also said to expect more than eight cores in the final lineup.[9] At Computex 2019, AMD revealed that the Zen 2 "Matisse" processors would feature up to 12 cores, and a few weeks later a 16 core processor was also revealed at E3 2019, being the aforementioned Ryzen 9 3950X.[10][11]

Zen 2 includes hardware mitigations to the Spectre security vulnerability.[12] Zen 2-based EPYC server CPUs use a design in which multiple CPU dies (up to eight in total) manufactured on a 7 nm process ("chiplets") are combined with a 14 nm I/O die on each multi-chip module (MCM) package. Using this, up to 64 physical cores and 128 total compute threads (with simultaneous multithreading) are supported per socket. This architecture is nearly identical to the layout of the "pro-consumer" flagship processor Threadripper 3990X.[13] Zen 2 delivers about 15% more instructions per clock than Zen and Zen+,[14][15] the 14- and 12-nm microarchitectures utilized on first and second generation Ryzen respectively.

Both the PlayStation 5 and the Xbox Series X and Series S use chips based on the Zen 2 microarchitecture, with proprietary tweaks and different configurations in each system's implementation than AMD sells in its own commercially available APUs.[16][17]

Design[edit]

Two delidded Zen 2 processors designed with the multi-chip module approach. The CPU on the left (top on mobile) (used for mainstream Ryzen CPUs) uses a smaller, less capable I/O die and up to two CCDs (only one is used on this particular example), while the one on the right (bottom, used for high-end desktop, HEDT, Ryzen Threadripper and server Epyc CPUs) uses a larger, more capable I/O die and up to eight CCDs.

Zen 2 is a significant departure from the physical design paradigm of AMD's previous Zen architectures, Zen and Zen+. Zen 2 moves to a multi-chip module design where the I/O components of the CPU are laid out on its own, separate die, which is also called a chiplet in this context. This separation has benefits in scalability and manufacturability. As physical interfaces don't scale very well with shrinks in process technology, their separation into a different die allows these components to be manufactured using a larger, more mature process node than the CPU dies. The CPU dies (referred to by AMD as core complex dies or CCDs), now more compact due to the move of I/O components onto another die, can be manufactured using a smaller process with fewer manufacturing defects than a larger die would exhibit (since the chances of a die having a defect increases with device (die) size) while also allowing for more dies per wafer. In addition, the central I/O die can service multiple chiplets, making it easier to construct processors with a large number of cores.[13][18][19]

Simplified illustration of the Zen 2 microarchitecture

On the left (top on mobile): Die shot of a Zen 2 Core Complex Die. On the right (bottom): Die shot of a Zen 2 EPYC I/O die.

With Zen 2, each CPU chiplet houses 8 CPU cores, arranged in 2 core complexes (CCXs), each of 4 CPU cores. These chiplets are manufactured using TSMC's 7 nanometerMOSFET node and are about 74 to 80 mm2 in size.[18] The chiplet has about 3.8 billion transistors, while the 12 nm I/O die (IOD) is ~125 mm2 and has 2.09 billion transistors.[20] The amount of L3 cache has been doubled to 32 MB, with each CCX in the chiplet now having access to 16 MB of L3 compared to the 8 MB of Zen and Zen+.[21]AVX2 performance is greatly improved by an increase in execution unit width from 128-bit to 256-bit.[22] There are multiple variants of the I/O die: one manufactured on GlobalFoundries14 nanometer process, and another manufactured using the same company's 12 nanometer process. The 14 nanometer dies have more features and are used for the EPYC Rome processors, whereas the 12 nm versions are used for consumer processors.[18] Both processes have similar feature sizes, so their transistor density is also similar.[23]

AMD's Zen 2 architecture can deliver higher performance at a lower power consumption than Intel's Cascade Lake architecture, with an example being the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X running with a TDP of 140 W in ECO mode delivering higher performance than the Intel Core i9-10980XE running with a TDP of 165 W.[24]

New features[edit]

Feature tables[edit]

CPUs[edit]

CPU features table

APUs[edit]

APU features table

Products[edit]

On 26 May 2019, AMD announced six Zen 2-based desktop Ryzen processors (codenamed "Matisse"). These included 6-core and 8-core variants in the Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 product lines, as well as a new Ryzen 9 line that includes the company's first 12-core and 16-core mainstream desktop processors. [29]

The Matisse I/O die is also used as the X570 chipset.

AMD's second generation of Epyc processors, codenamed "Rome", feature up to 64 cores, and were launched on 7 August 2019.[8]

Desktop CPUs[edit]

Model Release date
and price
FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocketPCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)[ii]
Memory
support
TDP
Base Boost L1L2L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 3100[30]April 21, 2020
$99
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
4 (8) 2 × 2 3.6 3.9 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 3300X[31]April 21, 2020
$120
1 × 4 3.8 4.3 16 MB
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 3500 November 15, 2019
OEM (West)
Japan ¥16000[32]
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
6 (6) 2 × 3 3.6 4.1 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 3500X[33]October 8, 2019
China ¥1099
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen 5 3600[34]July 7, 2019
US $199
6 (12) 3.6 4.2
Ryzen 5 Pro 3600[35]September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 5 3600X[36]July 7, 2019
US $249
3.8 4.4 95 W
Ryzen 5 3600XT[37]July 7, 2020
US $249
4.5
Performance
Ryzen 7 Pro 3700[38]September 30, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 (16) 2 × 4 3.6 4.4 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W[iii]
Ryzen 7 3700X[40]July 7, 2019
US $329
Ryzen 7 3800X[41]July 7, 2019
US $399
3.9 4.5 105 W
Ryzen 7 3800XT[42]July 7, 2020
US $399
4.7
Enthusiast
Ryzen 9 3900[43]October 8, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 3.1 4.3 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
64 MB
16 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 9 Pro 3900[44]September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 9 3900X[45]July 7, 2019
US $499
3.8 4.6 105 W[iv]
Ryzen 9 3900XT[46]July 7, 2020
US $499
4.7
Ryzen 9 3950X[47]November 25, 2019
US $749
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.5
High-End Desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 3960X[48]November 25, 2019
US $1399
TSMC
7FF
4 × CCD
1 × I/O
24 (48) 8 × 3 3.8 4.5 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
128 MB
16 MB per CCX
sTRX464 (56+8) DDR4-3200
quad-channel
280 W[v]
Ryzen Threadripper 3970X[50]November 25, 2019
US $1999
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.7 4.5
Ryzen Threadripper 3990X[51]February 7, 2020
US $3990
8 × CCD
1 × I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.9 4.3 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
Workstation
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3945WX[52]July 14, 2020
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 4.0 4.3 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
64 MB
16 MB per CCX
sWRX8 128 (120+8) DDR4-3200
octa-channel
280 W
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3955WX[53]July 14, 2020
OEM
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.9
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX[54]July 14, 2020
OEM
4 × CCD
1 × I/O
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.5 4.2 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3995WX[55]July 14, 2020
OEM
8 × CCD
1 × I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.7 4.2 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCXs) × cores per CCX
  2. ^The chipset itself provides additional user-accessible PCIe lanes and integrated PCIe devices, see AM4 chipsets.
  3. ^Ryzen 7 3700X may consume over 90 W under load.[39]
  4. ^Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 9 3950X may consume over 145 W under load.[39]
  5. ^Ryzen Threadripper 3990X may consume over 490 W under load.[49]

Desktop APUs[edit]

Mobile processors[edit]

Renoir (4000 series)[edit]

Model Release
date
SOC CPU GPU SocketPCIe
lanes
Memory supportTDP
FabTransistors

(million)

Die Size

(mm²)

Cores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel,
config[ii]
Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 4300U[57][58]March 16, 2020 TSMC
7FF
9,800 156 4 (4) 1 × 4 2.7 3.7 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB AMD Radeon Graphics
320:20:8
5 CU
1400 MHz 896 FP6 16 (8+4+4) DDR4-3200
LPDDR4-4266
dual-channel
10–25 W
Ryzen 3 PRO 4450U[59]May 7, 2020 4 (8) 2.5
Ryzen 5 4500U[60][61]March 16, 2020 6 (6) 2 × 3 2.3 4.0 8 MB
4 MB per CCX
AMD Radeon Graphics
384:24:8
6 CU
1500 MHz 1152
Ryzen 5 4600U[62]6 (12) 2.1
Ryzen 5 PRO 4650U[63]May 7, 2020
Ryzen 5 4680U[64]April 13, 2021 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1344
Ryzen 5 4600HS[65]March 16, 2020 3.0 AMD Radeon Graphics
384:24:8
6 CU
1152 35 W
Ryzen 5 4600H[66][67]35–54 W
Ryzen 7 4700U[68]8 (8) 2 × 4 2.0 4.1 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 10–25 W
Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U[69]May 7, 2020 8 (16) 1.7
Ryzen 7 4800U[70]March 16, 2020 1.8 4.2 AMD Radeon Graphics
512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792
Ryzen 7 4980U[71]April 13, 2021 2.0 4.4 1950 MHz 1996.8
Ryzen 7 4800HS[72]March 16, 2020 2.9 4.2 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 35 W
Ryzen 7 4800H[73][74]35–54 W
Ryzen 9 4900HS[75]3 4.3 AMD Radeon Graphics
512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792 35 W
Ryzen 9 4900H[76]3.3 4.4 35–54 W

Lucienne (5000 series)[edit]

Embedded processors[edit]

Server processors[edit]

Common features of these CPUs:

  • Codenamed "Rome"
  • The number of PCI-E lanes: 128
  • Release date: August 7, 2019 except EPYC 7H12 which was released on September 18, 2019
  • Memory support: eight-channel DDR4-3200
Model Price FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocket &
configuration
TDP
Base Boost L1L2L3
All-core Max
EPYC 7232P US $450 7 nm2 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 (16) 4 × 2 3.1 3.2 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
8 MB per CCX
SP3
1P
120 W
EPYC 7302P US $825 4 × CCD
1 × I/O
16 (32) 8 × 2 3 3.3 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
155 W
EPYC 7402P US $1250 24 (48) 8 × 3 2.8 3.35 180 W
EPYC 7502P US $2300 32 (64) 8 × 4 2.5 3.35
EPYC 7702P US $4425 8 × CCD
1 × I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2 3.35 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
200 W
EPYC 7252 US $475 2 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 (16) 4 × 2 3.1 3.2 64 MB
16 MB per CCX
SP3
2P
120 W
EPYC 7262 US $575 4 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 × 1 3.2 3.4 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
155 W
EPYC 7272 US $625 2 × CCD
1 × I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 2.9 3.2 64 MB
16 MB per CCX
120 W
EPYC 7282 US $650 16 (32) 4 × 4 2.8 3.2
EPYC 7302 US $978 4 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 × 2 3 3.3 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
155 W
EPYC 7352 US $1350 24 (48) 8 × 3 2.3 3.2
EPYC 7402 US $1783 8 × 3 2.8 3.35 180 W
EPYC 7452 US $2025 32 (64) 8 × 4 2.35 3.35 155 W
EPYC 7502 US $2600 8 × 4 2.5 3.35 180 W
EPYC 7532 US $3350 8 × CCD
1 × I/O
16 × 2 2.4 3.3 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
200 W
EPYC 7542 US $3400 4 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 × 4 2.9 3.4 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
225 W
EPYC 7552 US $4025 6 × CCD
1 × I/O
48 (96) 12 × 4 2.2 3.3 192 MB
16 MB per CCX
200 W
EPYC 7642 US $4775 8 × CCD
1 × I/O
16 × 3 2.3 3.3 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
225 W
EPYC 7662 US $6150 64 (128) 16 × 4 2 3.3 225 W
EPYC 7702 US $6450 2 3.35 200 W
EPYC 7742 US $6950 2.25 3.4 225 W
EPYC 7H12 2.6 3.3 280 W
EPYC 7F32 US $2100 4 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 (16) 8 × 1 3.7 3.9 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
SP3
1P/2P
180 W
EPYC 7F52 US $3100 8 × CCD
1 × I/O
16 (32) 16 × 1 3.5 3.9 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
240 W
EPYC 7F72 US $2450 6 × CCD
1 × I/O
24 (48) 12 × 2 3.2 3.7 192 MB
16 MB per CCX
240 W
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX

Video game consoles[edit]

Gallery[edit]

  • Infrared die shot of the I/O Die

  • Zen 2 Core Complex Die (CCD)

  • AMD EPYC 7702 server processor.

  • A delidded AMD 7702 featuring 8 CCDs, with remains of the solder thermal interface material (TIM) on the chiplets.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"AMD Unleashes Ultimate PC Gaming Platform with Worldwide Availability of AMD Radeon RX 5700 Series Graphics Cards and AMD Ryzen 3000 Series Desktop Processors" (Press release). Santa Clara, California: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. 7 July 2019. Retrieved 7 November 2020.
  2. ^Larabel, Michael (16 May 2017). "AMD Talks Up Vega Frontier Edition, Epyc, Zen 2, ThreadRipper". Phoronix. Retrieved 16 May 2017.
  3. ^ abCutress, Ian (20 June 2017). "AMD EPYC Launch Event Live Blog". AnandTech. Retrieved 21 June 2017.
  4. ^ abCutress, Ian (9 January 2019). "AMD Ryzen third Gen 'Matisse' Coming Mid 2019: Eight Core Zen 2 with PCIe 4.0 on Desktop". AnandTech. Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  5. ^online, heise. "AMD Ryzen 3000: 12-Kernprozessoren für den Mainstream". c't Magazin.
  6. ^ abLeather, Antony. "AMD Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 7 3700X Review: Old Ryzen Owners Look Away Now". Forbes. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
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  9. ^Hachman, Mark (9 January 2019). "AMD's CEO Lisa Su confirms ray tracing GPU development, hints at more 3rd-gen Ryzen cores". Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  10. ^Curtress, Ian (26 May 2019). "AMD Ryzen 3000 Announced: Five CPUs, 12 Cores for $499, Up to 4.6 GHz, PCIe 4.0, Coming 7/7". Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  11. ^Thomas, Bill (10 June 2019). "AMD announces the Ryzen 9 3950X, a 16-core mainstream processor". Retrieved 3 July 2019.
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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zen_2

Oooy Yura. Forgive me. -Here. Have a drink. After draining a glass of water, the woman stared through Katherine again.

2 amd ryzen

Who is first. Get your dried minnows out. She burst out laughing at her words, and once again to herself repeated: Dried minnows, I picked them up well. "Roman understood his wife's joke, and immediately switched the arrows to Alexander.

Let's talk about our big mistake... - AMD Ryzen 2nd vs 3rd Gen

Space and time of place. Places among the bright stars burning with living light, seeing off a ship crippled by particles of fine dust and wandering asteroids ahead of them. Star cruise tourist empty without all the crew, and the tourists themselves yacht, Zenobia.

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There was no one to go to study, the majority of the people abandoned this business, thereby undermining the intentions of my friend, the actor, which consisted, no more, no less, as in creating their own private theater, in which our troupe was supposed to play. Then almost a year passed, and again I saw Irina in May 2013, in the park, at a party.

It was already late evening, nine o'clock, I was walking and looking, and there Irina was standing next to her husband. I boldly approach them, say hello, she is sincerely happy when she recognizes me, explains to her husband that I am also from a.



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