4 speed turbo 400

4 speed turbo 400 DEFAULT

TH Transmissions
3 Speed Automatic Racing Transmissions

Note: Any ATI TH can be made to PG length for an additional charge. Call and check core availability for 4WD units. Refundable core charge for acceptable transmission core is $, If a SuperCase is used: $


Street/Strip T Transmission   Rated up to HP

Auto Function Valve Body
  • Race Clutches and Steels
  • Blue-printed High Flow Front Pump
  • ATI Forward Auto Valve Body
  • ATI HD Sprag Assembly w/steel drum
  • OEM Transmission Pan
  • Ears left on
Add a SuperCase and Chevy Bell - $1,


DescriptionHP RatingPart #Price
Chevy CaseHP$1,
Chevy Case, DF BellHPDF$2,
 

Street Rod T Transmission and Converter Combo   Rated up to HP


Save money when you buy your transmission and converter together! Choose from several applications that include an ATI Street/Strip transmissions, a Streetmaster Torque Converter, transmission cooler, a “Trick Stick” locking dipstick and tube and, on non electronic units, a case of ATI’s Super F™ automatic transmission fluid! Other components and a variety of options are also available.

Package Price - $2, (Part #)
 

DescriptionPart #Price
T Street Strip Forward Auto Transmission$1,
Streetmaster Torque Converter/40
$
Polyurethane Transmission Mount$
Trick Stick$
Cooler with Fan$
Cooler installation Kit$
Super F ATF - Case 12 quarts$
Crate Fee $
Core Charge* $
Total if purchased separately--$3,
PACKAGE PRICE$2,

Saves $ when purchasing entire package

OPTION #1 - HD CENTER SUPPORT$
OPTION #2 - HD TORSIONAL INPUT SHAFT$
OPTION #3 - STL DIR DRUM W/HD 34 ELE SPRAG$
OPTION #4 - DEEP CAST ALUMINUM PAN$

* Credit may be obtained for the return of a good core on the T and T Kits    DOWNLOAD CORE CREDIT FORM
OEM case upgrades

For OEM Case Ts, add an SFI Supercase and Chevy Bell at time of build for $

Add ATI's SFI Direct Fit Bellhousing installed on OEM case for $
 ATI's Direct Fit Bells feature a machined indicating
lip to ensure proper location on machined OEM cases

Competition T Transmission  Rated up to HP

Manual Valve Body
· Add a SuperCase and Chevy Bell for $1,
  • Race Clutches and Steels
  • Blue-printed High Flow Front Pump
  • ATI Reverse Manual Valve Body
  • ATI HD Sprag Assembly w/steel drum
  • OEM Transmission Pan
  • Ears cut off - no inspection pan mounts for ease of installation and header clearance
DescriptionHP RatingPart #Price
Chevy Case, Forward Pattern HP$1,
OEM Case, Forward Pattern, SFI Direct Fit Bell HPDF$2,
Chevy Case, Reverse Pattern HP$1,
OEM Case, Reverse Pattern, SFI Direct Fit Bell HPDF$2,

Top

Transbrake T Transmission  Rated up to HP

Reverse Manual · Add a SuperCase and Chevy Bell for $1,
  • Race Clutches and Steels
  • Blue-printed High Flow Front Pump
  • ATI Compu-Flow Transbrake Valve Body
  • ATI Heavy Duty Sprag with steel drum
 
  • ATI Heavy Duty Center Support
  • OEM Transmission Pan
  • Ears cut off - no inspection pan mounts for ease of installation and header clearance

DescriptionHP RatingPart #Price
Chevy Case HP$2,
OEM Case, SFI Direct Fit Bell HPDF$2,

Top

Pro T Transmission   Rated up to 1, HP

Reverse Manual, Good for high HP cars up to lbs

  • Race Clutches and Steels
  • Blueprinted High Flow Front Pump
  • Heat-treated Stator Tube, pinned
  • Roller Bearings
  • ATI Reverse Manual Compu Flow Valve Body
  • ATI Severe Duty Alum Direct Drum One-year warranty on Drum Assembly
  • M Input Shaft with OEM steel drum
  • M Intermediate Shaft
 
  • Heavy Duty Steel Forward Clutch Hub
  • Heavy Duty Center Support machined for faster transbrake and bronze support bushing
  • Heavy Duty Clutch Packs
  • -6 AN Fittings (in Supercase units)
  • High Flow Filter
  • Deep Aluminum Cast Transmission Pan
  • Low Gear-helical

DescriptionHP RatingPart #Price
OEM Chevy Case1, HP$2,
OEM Case - SFI Direct Fit Bell1, HPDF$3,
SFI SuperCase & Chevy Bell1, HPSC$4,
Transbrake - OEM Case1, HP$2,
Transbrake - OEM Case, SFI Direct Fit Bell1, HPDF$3,
Transbrake - SuperCase & Chevy Bell1, HPSC$4,

Top

Fuel Comp T Transmission   Rated up to 1, HP

Reverse Manual, Good for high HP cars up to lbs

  • Race Clutches and Steels
  • Blueprinted High Flow Front Pump
  • Heat-treated Stator Tube, pinned
  • Roller Bearings
  • ATI Reverse Manual Compu-Flow Valve Body
  • ATI 36 Element Severe Duty Aluminum Direct Drum
    • billet aluminum piston
    • Steel sleeve for Teflon ring use
  • 1 year warranty on Drum Sprag Failure in drag cars
 
  • Vasco Intermediate Shaft
  • Heavy Duty Steel Forward Clutch Hub
  • Heavy Duty Center Support machined for faster transbrake and bronze support bushing
  • Increased Clutch Capacity / Heavy Duty Clutch Packs
  • 6 AN Fittings in SuperCase units
  • Deep Aluminum Cast Transmission Pan
  • Low Gear-helical
DescriptionHP RatingPart #Price
OEM Chevy Case1, HP$2,
OEM Case- SFI Direct Fit Bell1, HPDF$3,
SFI SuperCase & Chevy Bell1, HPSC$4,
Transbrake - OEM Case1, HP$3,
Transbrake - OEM Case, SFI Direct Fit Bell1, HPDF$3,
Transbrake - SuperCase & Chevy Bell1, HPSC$4,


COPO Spec T Transmission
Now you can order a T with the same specifications used in the new COPO Camaro
  • Aluminum Forward and Direct Drums
  • ATI Reverse Manual Valve Body
  • ATI SFI T Supercase
  • Roller Bearing Tail housing
  • Transmission Catch Can
DescriptionPart #Price
Naturally Aspirated
Aluminum Direct Drum with 34 element sprag and Aluminum Forward Drum with M input
$4,
Supercharged
Vasco input and intermediate shafts, hardened stator tube, 36 element severe duty direct drum
$5,


DescriptionPart #Price
+ COPO Naturally Aspirated PackageGM$5,
+ COPO Supercharged PackageGM$5,

+ COPO Packages include Quick Disconnect Cooler Lines, Lokar dipstick, Polyurethane mount, catch can, 2 gallons of Super F ATF and shipping crate

 

 





COPO Camaro Specs from GM:PDF

Mopar Gen III HEMI T Transmission
Rated to HP and bolts directly to your Gen III Hemi


ATTENTION HELLCAT OWNERS

These transmissions are assembled in ATI’s SFI case with an SFI Mopar specific bellhousing. The appropriate flexplate, crank adapter and required bolts are also included so a standard GM converter with a small bolt circle drops right in. Standard gear ratio is the OEM / Core charge and shipping crate are included in the price of these transmissions.

  • Exclusive billet aluminum with 36 element sprag
  • Compu-Flow Reverse Manual Transbrake
  • Roller bearing tailhousing
  • Vasco input and main shaft
  • Deep aluminum pan
  • LOKAR firewall mount dipstick
  • 10 quarts of ATI’s 30W Super F synthetic fluid
 



DescriptionPart #Price
New Gen HEMI Trans, SuperCase & ATI HEMI Bell *
$6,
New Gen HEMI Trans, SuperCase & Dual Starter Packets in HEMI Bell * $6,

* Includes an 8” (#) or 9”(#) Fuel & Blown Converter.
For a 10” Fuel & Blown (#), add $
For a / Fuel & Blown (#/#), add $

3-Speed Max Duty Outlaw T Transmission
ATI Aluminum Transbrake, HP as equipped or up to HP depending on options
  • Race Clutches and Steels
  • Increased clutch capacity in all positions - Up to 9 forward, 8 direct and 6 intermediates
  • Blueprinted high-flow front pump with heat-treated tube or ATI Super Pump
  • Billet aluminum safety reverse transbrake valve body (band apply option available)
  • ATI Severe Duty 36 element alum direct drum with billet piston
  • Vasco intermediate shaft
  • 1” Vasco input shaft with new lightweight steel drum & billet piston
  • HT steel forward clutch hub
  • HD center support
  • HD cast aluminum bearing tail
  • New billet aluminum reverse servo cover
  • Deep aluminum cast pan
  • -6 AN fittings
  • Lokar® direct mount dipstick

 



DescriptionInputGear RatioGear TypePart #Price

Low

Second
SuperCase & Chevy Bell - 5 pinion planetary
1" Vasco Helical CutSC$6,
SuperCase & Chevy Bell - 6 pinion aluminum carrier1" Vasco Straight CutSC$8,
SuperCase & Chevy Bell - 6 pinion aluminum carrier1" Vasco Straight CutSC$8,
SuperCase & Chevy Bell - 6 pinion aluminum carrier1" Vasco Straight CutSC$8,
SuperCase & Chevy Bell - 6 pinion aluminum carrier1" Vasco Straight CutSC$9,
SuperCase & Chevy Bell - Includes main shaft, M Output and sheet metal pan - / Available with large main only! Add $/16" M Straight CutSC$13,

Optional HD M output shaft recommended for vehicles over 3, lbs (with BBC) or 3, lbs (with SBC)

$

Convert your ATI T to Lock-Up starting at $


3-Speed Max Duty Outlaw Lock-Up T Transmission

DescriptionLock UpMain ShaftOutputGear RatioGear TypePart #Price

Low

Second
SuperCase & Chevy Bell&#;1"M Straight CutLU*$10,
SuperCase & Chevy Bell - includes sheet metal pan.
&#;"M Straight CutLU*$14,
Add a standard welded Lock Up converter for $2, or a bolt together Lock up converter for $3,
ATI's welded Outlaw Lock-Up Converters provide 0% slip for up to HP while the Bolt Together Lock Up Converter will provide 0% slip all the way up to HP. Both converters feature 5-axis billet aluminum back cover, dual o-ring sealing, optional Nissan style pump and multiple stator designs. A bronze pilot option is also available. 


 2-Speed Max Duty Outlaw T Transmission

  • Race Clutches and Steels
  • Increased clutch capacity in all positions - up to 9 forward, 8 direct and 6 intermediates
  • Blueprinted high-flow front pump with heat-treated tube or ATI Super Pump
  • Billet aluminum safety reverse transbrake valve body (band apply option available)
  • Vasco intermediate shaft
  • ATI Severe Duty 36 element alum direct drum with billet piston
  • 1” Vasco input shaft with new lightweight steel drum & billet piston
  • HT steel forward clutch hub
  • HD center support
  • HD cast aluminum bearing tail
  • New billet aluminum reverse servo cover
  • Deep aluminum cast pan
  • -6 AN fittings
  • Lokar® direct mount dipstick
 

 

As horsepower gets easier and cheaper to make and racers set the bar higher and higher, a need is created for numerically lower gear sets with higher strength requirements. Today&#;s high HP racer needs a durable transmission with a less aggressive starting line ratio. Most racers achieve this by converting the Turbo transmission to a 2-speed unit allowing them the ability to leave off the transbrake in 2nd gear. ATI now has an answer for this market and offers three variations of a 2-speed Turbo ! OEM cased units are rated to HP and not intended for heavy weight cars. ATI SuperCase recommended over HP!

2-Speed Max-Duty Outlaw T Transmission 1, to 3, HP Max rating, depending on options

Description Case BellLow Gear Gear TypePart #Price
T MAX DUTY 2-SPEED OUTLAW OEM
Direct Fit
SFI Chevy Bell
Straight CutDF$5,
T MAX DUTY 2-SPEED OUTLAW SFI SuperCase
SFI Chevy Bell
Straight CutSC$6,
T MAX DUTY 2-SPEED OUTLAWOEM
Direct Fit
SFI Chevy Bell
Helical
5-pinion
DF$5,
T MAX DUTY 2-SPEED OUTLAW SFI SuperCase SFI Chevy BellHelical
5-pinion
SC$6,
T MAX DUTY 2-SPEED OUTLAW SFI SuperCase SFI Chevy BellStraight CutSC$7,

Optional HD M output shaft recommended for vehicles over 3, lbs (with BBC) or 3, lbs (with SBC)

$


Brake in 1st and 2nd. Choose any Wicked Quick Transbrake available at no charge on Max Duty units.

Reverse Manual Transbrake, PRN , No Band Apply

--

Reverse Transbrake P(RN)N, No Band Apply Clean Neutral

CN

--




T Build Options - Prices good only on installed items
T SuperCase w/Chevy Bell

$

T Wicked Quick Valve body -

$

HD Center Support with Bronze Bushing

$

HD Steel Fwd Clutch Hub

$

HD Steel Fwd Clutch Hub - Material

$80

HD Lightweight Steel LW

$

Alum Direct Drum w/34 elem

$

Severe Duty Alum. Direct Drum

$

M Input w/Forward Drum

$

Vasco Input Shaft w/Fwd Drum

$

Input w/ Alum Drum ( HP Max)

$

Vasco Input w/Alum Fwd Drum

$

Trigger Ring, ATI Drum only

$

Vasco intermediate shaft - Carries 1 year warranty for up to HP - ATI Clutch hub required V

$

M Output with bushing, std length

$

M Output with bushing, PG length P

$

 
Roller tailhousing-aftermarket OEM Length

$

Roller tailhousing-aftermarket - PG Length

$

Bolt Together Aluminum Pump

$

Adjustable Regulator Kit

$75

Lokar Direct Mount Dipstick

$82

Lokar Firewall Mount Dipstick

$

Trick Stick bell mount 20" forward bend

$39

-6 AN trans cooler line fittings

$25

-8 AN trans cooler line fittings

$25

Jiffy Tite Cooler Line Kit

$99

Transmission Catch Can

$90

Polyurethane Trans mount

$35

Moroso Deep Sheet Metal Pan

$

ATI Sheet Metal Deep Pan

$

Deep Aluminum Cast Pan

$



Black Magic&#; Lock-Up Components
Attention transmission builders! If you are a qualified transmission builder, ask about our new line of Lock-Up transmission components for the T In order to be considered for this program, you must be a qualified performance business located at a commercial location. A business license and Tax ID number are required. Please note: Lock up parts are not returnable and not for individual sale!

Description Part #
Lock Up Super Pump, OEM Shaft with adjustable pressure regulatorL
Lock Up Super Pump, Big Shaft with adjustable pressure regulatorL
Input Shaft, M Big, Lightweight Heat-Treated Steel Forward Drum with Aluminum PistonL
Input Shaft, Vasco Big, Lightweight Heat-Treated Steel Forward Drum with Aluminum PistonLV
Input Shaft, M Big, Aluminum Forward Drum with Steel InsertL
Input Shaft, Vasco Big, Aluminum Forward Drum with Steel InsertLV
Input Shaft, Vasco OEM, Aluminum Forward Drum with Steel InsertL
Input Shaft, Vasco OEM, Lightweight Steel Forward Drum Aluminum PistonL
Lock up Hose and Solenoid Kit
Cooler Pressure Dump Hose and Solenoid Kit

Designed for use with ATI Aluminum Valve Bodies*. Must add one of the following:

KD Converter Dump (Big Shaft)

LD Converter Dump (Big Shaft) Lock Up

D Converter Dump with stator tube/plate assembly (OEM shaft)

LD Converter Dump with stator tube/plate assembly (OEM shaft) Lock Up

*Note: Wicked Quick® Valve Bodies are ready to use. Case modifications are required.



T SuperCase
®Transmission Case


Awarded SEMA's Best New Racing & Performance Product for


The new cast aluminum T SuperCase is the result of over 2 years of development. Designed in-house at ATI, and cast here in theUSA, and machined at ATI on 4-Axis Horizontal CNC machines, the T SuperCase features improved fluid pathways to assure better performance and will accept any of ATI&#;s SFI bellhousings, along with the Reid bell (with slight modifications) and Browell cans.


Photos:

Features:

&#; Heavy-duty T6 cast aluminum case meeting SFI specs with no internal or external shield needed
&#; Made in the USA and machined in-house at ATI using only two fixturing set-ups to provide optimum accuracy
&#; Accepts OEM pans, extension housings and 99% of all stock internal components
 
&#; CNC machined minimum depth valve body passages yield extremely fast transbrake releases and quicker shift times
&#;

Accepts all current ATI Super Bells for many engines and other bells on the market

&#; Features additional center support lugs to provide additional 2nd gear strength, with a modified pressure plate supplied
 
&#; Provisions for three extra bolts added to help secure the center support and intermediate pressure plate
&#; Increased thickness extension housing/output shaft bearing area provides extra support for 4x4 units
&#; Roller bearing for output shaft (bushing available by request)
&#; Cooler lines are 1/4" NPT to accept PG quick-connect lines and other popular cooler hoses and fittings

Description

Part Number

Price

ATI T SUPERCASE - Chevy Bell and Transmission Case

$

ATI T SUPERCASE - Heavy Duty Chevy Bellhousing ONLY - no case

HD

$

ATI T SUPERCASE - Heavy Duty Chevy Bellhousing ONLY - 1" deep - for Lock-Up

+1

$

ATI SUPERCASE - TH - Case Only

$

ATI SUPERCASE - TH - Case with Ried bell pattern machine casting

MBP

$

ATI SUPERCASE - BOLT KIT - ATI BELL TO CASE - 6 BOLTS, 6 SERRATED WASHERS

$

ATI SUPERCASE - TH - Tailhousing w/ roller bearing - OEM Length

$

ATI SUPERCASE - TH - Tailhousing w/ roller bearing - PG Length

$

CAST TAILHOUSING WITH BUSHING - NEW OEM REPLACEMENT

$

EXTENSION HOUSING SEAL - OUTPUT SIZE

$



T SuperCase Bell Packages - Include Bell, flexplate, adapter and hardware. Option prices listed are available only at the time of order or while your T is being built.
SB Mopar, New Gen HEMI

$

SB Mopar, New Gen HEMI - Dual starter pocket

$

BB Mopar, 6 Bolt

$

BB Mopar, 8 Bolt

$

SB Ford, Tooth

$

SB Ford, Tooth - Ext Balance 28 oz

$

SB Ford, Tooth - Ext Balance 50 oz

$

 
SB Ford, Tooth

$

SB Ford, Tooth - Ext Balance 28 oz

$

SB Ford, Tooth - Ext Balance 50 oz

$

BB Ford, Tooth, Internally balanced

$

BB Ford, Tooth, Externally balanced

$

Toyota 2JZ - Requires ATI 8" or 9" Converter

$


 


TH Parking Pawl Pin
ATI's Parking Pawl Pin for T transmissions. With this new, hard to find replacement pin and clip, there will be no more headaches from digging through old cases for rusted up used pins! The new hardened steel pin comes standard on ATI&#;s T Supercase Transmission builds and is engineered to original GM specs.

Description

Part Number

Price

TH - PARKING PAWL PIN

$


T Roller bearings
Description

Part #

Price

TH - BEARING - DIRECT DRUM - Used in between the reverse ring gear and output for OEM and between the cut forward clutch hub and direct clutch drum (optional build)

$

TH - BEARING - CENTER SUPPORT TO SUN GEAR - For use between the center support and sun gear (OEM applications)

$

TH - BEARING - REAR INTERNAL GEAR - For use between the bottom of the sun gear to rear planetary ring gear on all Turbo units

$

TH Shift Shaft Kit
Shift shafts in T transmissions can become corroded in harsh environments. This direct replacement piece is yellow zinc plated for maximum corrosion protection. Includes serrated flange nuts for improved holding capacity.

Description

Part Number

Price

TH - SHIFT SHAFT WITH DOUBLE
O-RINGS AND FLANGE NUTS

M

$

Park Pawl Release Spring

Description

Part Number

Price

TH - PARK PAWL RELEASE SPRING

$

Spring for Manual Valve Lever

Description

Part Number

Price

TH - SPRING FOR MANUAL VALVE LEVER

$

Park Pawl Actuator Rod
ATI's new T Park Pawl Actuator Rod is an all new piece that replaces the OEM unit.

Description

Part Number

Price

TH - PARK PAWL ACTUATOR ROD

$

Park Pawl Guide Plate
ATI's new T Park Pawl Guide Plate is an all new piece that replaces the OEM unit.

Description

Part Number

Price

TH - PARK PAWL GUIDE PLATE

$

Modulator Plug Clamp
ATI's new T Modulator Plug Clamp is an all new piece that replaces the OEM clamp on T valve bodies.

Description

Part Number

Price

T MODULATOR PLUG CLAMP

$

 

TH Center Support
The upgraded center support for the Turbo features a bronze bushing that virtually eliminates premature sprag failure. It is highly recommended for competition applications.

Also available with Teflon coating for aluminum drums


Description

Part Number

Price

TH - CENTER SUPPORT W/ BRONZE BUSHING
TH - CENTER SUPPORT - BILLET ALUMNUM - 2 SPD


$
$

Sours: http://www.atiracing.com/products/trans//index.htm

The vaunted Turbo-Hydramatic TH transmission, known more commonly as the Turbo , was developed back in the early s — making its debut in model year Cadillacs — as a three-speed automatic transmission. The transmission was quickly heralded for the number of advantages it delivered, including its impressive strength and the efficiency of its planetary gear design. Those key points, as history has shown, were not lost on the racers of the era, who found the Turbo to be an excellent piece for the strenuous conditions they put vehicles through.

These days, that very same, plus year old design is still used far and wide in drag racing, but more commonly, what was once a three-speed is now simply a two-speed, drawing direct parallels between it and another of General Motors’ famed transmissions: the two-speed Powerglide. While each have their time and place — as we’ll discuss later — the Turbo itself has the heads-up, outlaw drag racing market cornered, with high-tech, modern versions of the original Turbo-Hydramatic roaming the landscape from manufacturers just like Maryland’s ATI Performance Products Inc.

ATI Performance Products has been at the forefront of aftermarket Turbo development with their two- and three-speed variants, housed within their own aftermarket case.

ATI Performance Products has been at the forefront of aftermarket Turbo development with their two- and three-speed variants, housed within their own aftermarket case.

We’ve teamed with ATI to build us a new transmission for our newly-announced Project Evil Ford Mustang, which we&#;ll be campaigning in the Outlaw category on the west coast. The car will feature power from a cubic inch small block with a Vortech supercharger, with plenty of horsepower on tap being put to the pavement through an inch slick tire.

We sat down with ATI&#;s JC Beattie Jr. to gain a better understanding of the two-speed Turbo and how it compares head-to-head with the Powerglide in high-powered applications, as we take a guided walk-through of the build-up of our transmission and a discuss how this particular build will benefit our engine and tire combination.

The Turbo At A Glance

Despite all of the advances in engineering and technology in the decades since its launch, the Turbo is still widely considered one of the greatest original production transmissions ever conceived. But it’s as much the operation as the sheer strength that made the Turbo stand out then and now. This was made possible both with the addition of a large multi-plate clutch that could take high doses of input torque, and the cast iron center support for the concentric shafts that mate the clutch to the gear train.

Turbo Background

The production Turbo-Hydramatic benefited greatly in its development from a licensing deal that allowed GM to utilize the Simpson gear set design. The Turbo was the first three-speed transmission with the Simpson gearing, featuring over-running clutches that exhibited first and second gear interaction — in essence, there was no need to simultaneously release and engage the clutch to move from second to third gear.

Using both OEM and aftermarket cores, racing transmission builders have continued utilizing that very same design for decades to build nearly bulletproof units for high-horsepower drag racing, and today, it’s the transmission of choice for just such race cars. But, driven by power levels, gear ratios, and race distance to some extent, the Turbo has found new legs as a two-speed, just like its GM cousin, the Powerglide.

Battle Royale: The Turbo And The Powerglide

Choosing between the mighty Powerglide and a Turbo is largely a matter of horsepower, weight, and tire type. The difference, from a technical standpoint, and where these factors come into play, is in the strength of the design and the gear options that are available.

“A three-speed helps a lot of guys get down the track, because it doesn’t have the ratio drops that a Powerglide has. So it doesn’t upset the car on the gear change,” Beattie Jr. explains.

The available space inside of a Powerglide limits what low gear you can use and still propel a lot of horsepower. As Beattie Jr. puts it, you simply run out of physical space, because as you go numerically lower in the gear set, the larger the gears become physically. And a point comes where you just run right into the case itself. “There’s just a lot more room in a Turbo ,” he says.

glide

The mighty GM Powerglide &#; a design still utilized by untold numbers of drag racers. This is an original cross section cutaway of the unit from GM.

The Turbo , for its part, runs into the same situation, however, the gears are smaller to begin with, so there’s more room to grow. And with so many gear ratio options available on the market to cater to the wide variety of engine combinations, tires, and race distances, this is a good problem to have.

A three-speed helps a lot of guys get down the track, because it doesn’t have the ratio drops that a Powerglide has. So it doesn’t upset the car on the gear change.

“We can make a two-speed Turbo with a low gear, where our best high-horsepower Powerglides have a But the ratio drop is still a bit too much. We can do either one at 3, horsepower — the horsepower holding is there, it’s just about the car, the application, and getting down the track,” says Beattie Jr..

This RPM drop is an important point to keep in mind. To perform optimally, engines have to be kept in their power-band all the way down the race track. Any significant deviations will force the engine to labor as it catches back up, and perhaps even unload the tires and suspension. A two-speed Turbo goes at the shift point, and this, Beattie Jr. explains, is less of a gear split than any high-horse Powerglide (the lowest drop on a Turbo is , while the ‘Glide is ). Big-tire racers, in particular, like the close-ratio setup of a three-speed, because the lack of RPM drop allows them to keep the tire wrinkled and the chassis happy in the front half of the run.

Among the benefits of the Turbo is its unrivaled strength, thanks to their cast iron center support (now often made of billet). Today&#;s modern cases are also impressively strong, a well, creating nearly bulletproof transmissions.

Among the benefits of the Turbo is its unrivaled strength, thanks to its Simpson-style gear sets and the availability of a multitude of aftermarket internal parts. Those items housed in ATI&#;s aftermarket Super Case, with increased line pressure, make the nearly bulletproof.

The input shaft, however, is oft-considered the weak link in the Powerglide, more so than the gearset.

We can do either one at 3, horsepower — the horsepower holding is there, it’s just about the car, the application, and getting down the track.

Where the Powerglide does display an advantage over the Turbo , however, is in horsepower loss. A Turbo , with two sets of gears turning rather than one, and a drum that spins percent faster than engine RPM and then stops,robs additional horsepower. The percentage of loss is difficult to quantify and it is small for racers making 3, horsepower, according to Beattie Jr., but it’s there. Likewise, a Turbo also weighs a little more — around pounds in lightweight form. So there are certainly tradeoffs in either direction, but for some big-power combos, the Turbo is the only way to go.

Two-Speed Or Three?

As alluded to earlier, the Turbo was originally developed as a three-speed, and in non-racing circles, is still known for being as such. But these days, it’s almost a rarity to find a three-speed, aftermarket Turbo in use in heads-up drag racing, as the applications roaming the drag strip these days demand a different configuration. In fact, Beattie Jr. estimates that out of a hundred Outlaw-style cars (be they Pro Mods, Outlaw , Outlaw Radial, or similar), 99 of them will be running a two-speed Turbo , making them “just huge in that world,” as he puts it.

With a first gear ratio of for two-speeds (and a recently developed for three-speeds), the Turbo &#;s have become the go-to automatic transmission for heads-up drag racers making several thousand horsepower.

With a first gear ratio of for two-speeds (and a recently developed for three-speeds), the Turbo &#;s have become the go-to automatic transmission for heads-up drag racers making several thousand horsepower.

So why the move to a two-speed configuration?

Contrary to common thought, the need for a two- or three-speed configuration isn’t about race distance — eighth- or quarter-mile — but about the tire, track prep, and the horsepower. In fact, some of the top quarter-mile Pro Mod cars run a two-speed , but this is done because such powerful cars need a smaller low gear to get that power hooked up at the hit. Ideally they would run a lock up-style unit, as well, but some sanctioning bodies will not allow a lock up automatic to compete with a clutch.

Supercase1

Powerglides, while weighing less and robbing slightly less horsepower, are maxed out at a low gear, making them less forgiving than a two-speed Turbo Beyond that, the &#;Glides reach a limit in terms of horsepower due to their design.

Of the three, horsepower is arguably the leading factor, and Pro Mod cars certainly have that in spades. You see, the entire goal is to match the transmission gear ratio with the rear end ratio to arrive at a happy medium that gets the car off the starting line consistently while still arriving at the appropriate engine RPM and wheel speed at the finish line. Cars that don&#;t have the power to make useof the low gear will commonly go with a three-speed setup, where until recently, a was the smallest low gear option available. Radial tire cars in particular, when running on a flypaper-type of racing surface with 3,plus horsepower, can’t calm their combinations down enough with a three-speed. So you can see where cars with 4, horsepower and up would need — or rather require — a low gear, or even lower, with a tight ratio.

On the left, you can see the reaction carrier being assembled onto the gearset. Where the assembler's hand is situated is where the reverse band squeezes. On the far right, the rings are being placed on the two-speed billet center support. This is where the high gear drum will ride.

“If a guy is quicker with a three-speed, it’s because they either don’t have enough power to make use of a two-speed Turbo , or they’re carrying more weight and need the extra starting line ratio,: says Beattie Jr..

Top left: Here's a look down inside the case. The center support, which has 'teeth' around it, go into the teeth in the case, which satisfies a big failure point on OEM cases. You can also see the rear band and bearing installed down in the bottom of the case. Top right: Shown here are some of the components, including the backside of the pump (with the pressure regulator spring shown), the center support with the reaction carrier and gearset, and the mainshaft. The high gear drum and the input shaft and forward drum are also displayed in the back. Bottom left: The high gear drum, with a element sprag. Bottom right: The assembled high gear, gearset, and center support stack.

Internally, moving from a three to two-speed Turbo means you can remove some of the guts found in the three-speed, including the center support and intermediate clutches. At this point, you&#;re primarily operating off of the forward and direct clutches and the rear band. The intermediate clutches themselves are the second gear shift in a three-speed, but not in a two-speed. Otherwise, there are some minor valve body changes involved, as well.

If a guy is quicker with a three-speed, it’s because they either don’t have enough power to use a two-speed, or they’re carrying more weight.

In terms of the torque converter, moving from a three-speed to two would necessitate a change in torque converter. According to Beattie Jr., the best way to think of it is that you’re taking away mechanical advantage that was moving the car, and you’re asking the torque converter to do more and move the same amount of weight. So in essence, the torque converter flashes higher. And thus, if you took your three-speed converter that flashes at 5, rpm and put it in two-speed, moving from a to a , you’re probably going to have a converter that flashes rpm higher.

“You’re moving the same amount of weight, and it would be like taking the rear gear away,&#; says Beattie Jr.. &#;It’s harder to move, so it’s going to flash higher. Just thinking mathematically gear ratio-wise, the more gear the easier it is and the less work the converter has to do.&#;

Left: The high gear drum being slid down onto the main shaft. Right: Here you can see the assembly process from the image above, with the input shaft and forward drum being slid down through the pump.

So you might be wondering at this point if you can use a three-speed as a two-speed, and Beattie Jr. points out that it can be done with a valve body change with a transbrake for first or second gear, but for safety reasons, ATI prefers not to go that route.

“You really can’t have the best of both worlds, having a three-speed used as two. We can do it, but then it’s not a great three-speed nor is it a great two-speed. It’s never going to be right for both.”

Building A Two-Speed Turbo

Left: This view provides a good look at the underbelly of the case during assembly. Right: the two-speed center support and the main shafts installed. Everything else, including the gearset, is positioned behind it in the transmission.

The transmission being assembled here is built upon ATI’s own T Super Case, SFI-certified bellhousing, and roller bearing tail, and features a Moroso “shorty” pan with a pickup tube that places the filter in the rear, allowing for use of a Mopar-style filter. The pan holds Powerglide-like capacity, thus removing some extra weight, and also fits on cars with a crossmember that might be in the way.

Left: The high gear drum is wiggled onto the center support in the case. Right: the clutch eliminator installed right against the center support.

Inside is ATI’s Wicked Quick two-speed billet aluminum valve body, and a stock output shaft with a custom (/ is stock) low gear ratio. As Beattie Jr. shares in regards to the gearing selection: “When someone can’t put power down, because of the tire rules or the track, the stock gears ratios work for 1, horsepower without any troubles. This keeps guys from having to spend a bunch of money on an aftermarket gear set until they really get some power.&#;

Center: an endplate checker in use to check the depth from where the pump sits to where the bearing would ride on the forward drum with the input shaft. You want to have a little bit of clearance here -- usually between and inch. Right: At this point, everything inside a Turbo , minus the pump, is assembled and ready to go.

The transmission features a billet aluminum two-speed center support, an aluminum intermediate clutch eliminator (not used in a three-speed), a element sprag on a billet aluminumSevere-Duty direct drum (direct is high-gear) with a steel sleeve that allows for use of Teflon rings and higher line pressure. From there, the build includes a billet steel clutch hub, Vasco intermediate shaft (rated to around 2, horsepower) and input shaft (rated to 2, horsepower), a complete aluminum pump with a bolt-in heat-treated stator tube, an adjustable pressure regulator (allowing the pressure to be cranked from to pounds), and Calico-coated gears in the pump with tool steel anti-wear plates.

DSC_

A gasket being placed onto the backside of the pump.

On a centrifugally-supercharged combination like the one this transmission will sit behind, Beattie Jr. points out first that the driver has to be able to cut a light, so they’ll need engine RPM to do so. Controlling power at the hit can be a little more of a challenge with a blower, so by taking gearing away, you can cut a light and not shock the tire as hard at the hit while the boost is up. Because the car in question will run a radial, which is often dead-hook on a well-prepped track, a two-speed is more suitable. If it were a larger slick, where wheel speed and tire wrinkle are a factor, a three-speed with a or low gear would be more in line with the combination.

Left: This is the other side of the endplate checker. Right: The transmission assembly from the underside, with the valve body, the transbrake, filter, and pumps installed.

“Without the gear ratio, one doesn’t have to take away as much power, so there’s also not as much time spent manipulating how to put the power back in once the car is off the starting line,&#; says Beattie Jr.. &#;A nitrous or turbo car can be more easily controlled in terms of power-adding, but it’s a little harder with a supercharger.&#;

We've reached the finish line on the assembly. On the left is the transmission upright, while on the right you get a good look at the Moroso short pan. The 'step' in the pan allows for crossmembers to fit in cars set up for Powerglides, and also holds the same amount of fluid as a Powerglide. ATI goes this route to keep the weight down.

We’ll be bolting this transmission setup into our Evil Mustang later this year, at which point we’ll be able to take all of the knowledge gained here in regards to gearing and how they correlate with the engine and power adder combination to gain some true real-world experience. Of course, with the smallest-of-the-small tires out there under us and a whole lot of power under the hood, we&#;ll be taking full advantage of everything that a two-speed Turbo has to offer to get us off the starting line. Because with a tire that small, one needs all the help they can get.

Sours: https://www.dragzine.com/tech-stories/drivetrain/tech-powerglide-turbotwo-speed-three/
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Turbo-Hydramatic

Motor vehicle

Turbo-Hydramatic or Turbo Hydra-Matic is the registered tradename for a family of automatic transmissions developed and produced by General Motors. These transmissions mate a three-element turbinetorque converter to a Simpsonplanetary geartrain, providing three forward speeds plus reverse.

The Turbo-Hydramatic or Turbo Hydra-Matic (THM) series was developed to replace both the original Hydra-Matic models and the BuickDynaflow. In its original incarnation as the Turbo-Hydramatic , it was first used in the model year in Cadillacs. The Buick version, which followed shortly thereafter, was known as the Super-Turbine By , THM units had replaced all of GM's other automatic transmissions including Chevrolet's Powerglide, Buick's Super Turbine , and Oldsmobile's Jetaway. Starting in the early s, the Turbo-Hydramatic was gradually supplanted by four-speed automatics, some of which continue to use the "Hydramatic" trade name.

Although the Turbo Hydra-Matic name alludes to the original Hydra-Matic developed by General Motors' Cadillac division in the late s, the two transmissions were not mechanically related.

Super Turbine / THM / THM / 3L80 / 3L80HD[edit]

Turbo-Hydramatic Transmission

The THM can be visually identified by an oil pan number four shown at General Motors Transmission Pans. First introduced for the model year under the name "Turbo Hydra-Matic" in Cadillacs and "Super Turbine" in Buicks. The following year, application expanded to Oldsmobile and Pontiac and to some full-sized Chevrolets. Many of the Buick, Cadillac, and Oldsmobile THMs produced between and were equipped with a "Switch-Pitch" torque converter with a variable-pitch stator, which is sought after by collectors and drag racers. These can be identified outside the vehicle (with the torque converter removed) by a narrow front pump spline. Externally the switch pitch version has two electrical connections, where the non-switch pitch THM has only one. GM used a Switch Pitch torque converter in the Buick twin turbine Dynaflow transmission between – and the Super Turbine two speed transmissions used by Oldsmobile, Pontiac (Pontiac's ST didn't have a switch pitch), and Buick divisions between and This transmission (among other THMs) is identified by the "Park R N D L2 L1" selector quadrant. The switch pitch is not the only THM that utilizes an external 2 prong connector. Other units to include the 2 prong connectors had an internal pressure switch that was used to control spark timing retard. All THM units had a 32 spline output shaft with the exception of the THM that used a 27 spline output.

A variant of the THM known as a THM is a THM with a mid length 27 spline output shaft that mates to the smaller THM 27 spline drive shaft yoke. It can be identified by "THM" cast into the tailhousing. Internally the clutch packs originally had fewer friction plates. THMs were found in some Buick Lesabres and Oldsmobile Delta 88s with the liter V Somewhere in the Mid's Chevrolet C10 Pickups could also come equipped with a THM It is a THM Chevrolet bolt pattern case that has a longer 27 spline output shaft and matching extension housing with "TH" cast into the housing. Some "Heavy Duty" THMs were also designated THMB. Another variant is the 3L80HD, often referred to as a Turbo The 3L80HD has a straight-cut planetary gear set. There is no externally visible way to determine whether the transmission contains the straight-cut planetary gear set. The THM front wheel drive transmission shares almost all its internal parts with the THM Checker Motors Corporation Motor Company used the Chevrolet version of the THM for its "A" series taxi and Marathon models until the end of production in

By , the relatively heavy THM was being phased out of usage in passenger cars in response to demand for improved fuel economy. The THM was utilized in the C- and K-series (full-size) Chevrolet/GMC pickups and G-series (full-size) vans until when GM switched over to the 4L80E. Today, the United States ArmyHMMWV is the only vehicle using the THM The civilian Hummer H1 originally had the 3L80s, but the current model has had a 4L80E since the mids.

Through the end of the '70s substantially more CBOP (Cadillac/Buick/Oldsmobile/Pontiac) bellhousing THMs were produced than any other THM Chevrolet bellhousing THMs, while not rare, can be hard to find and are, as a result, usually more expensive to buy (they were commonly found in 3/4 ton ( GVW and above) Chevrolet/GMC trucks and vans (includes the P-series box vans and CUCVs) when RPO M40 was checked off the option list - especially when coupled to a - usually in HD applications including the CC60 medium duty trucks where a bolt-on output shaft is used in place of a slip yoke) - when used with passenger cars it was usually coupled to a Mark IV engine or some high performance small blocks (e.g. the LT-1). The THM was never produced with a multicase bell housing.

Other auto manufacturers have used the THM and its 4L80E successor, including Ferrari (in the /); Jaguar/Daimler (in pre XJ12 and XJ-S coupes and their Daimler stable mates); Rolls-Royce (in – Silver Shadow and Silver Spirit series cars, along with their Bentley stable mates); the Nissan Prince Royal; AM General; and Jeep (usually found in the FSJ pickups and SUVs). Early Jeep THMs used an adapter between the engine and transmission bell housing while later models had an AMC specific housing - which bolted to its inline six and V8. Though identical except for the bell housing pattern used through the '60s and ending in the THM was mated to the Dana model 18,20 and was the only transmission used with the Borg-Warner / all-wheel-drive transfer case used only in Jeeps (AMC/Jeep phased in the used of the Chrysler Torqueflite after until the FSJ platform was phased out), It has been known to adapt a THM to other engines using adapters.

THM transmissions are very popular in automotive competition due to their great strength. Much of this strength comes from the use of a cast iron center support to suspend the transmission's concentric shafts that join the clutch assemblies to the gear train. The center support, which is splined to the interior of the transmission's case, also provides a robust reaction point for first gear (the gear train's reaction carrier is restrained from counter-rotating the engine in first gear by a roller clutch whose inner race is part of the center support). Since the first gear reactive force is evenly distributed around the periphery of the case, the types of mechanical (and some times violent) failures that have plagued other competition transmissions[vague] are rare.

The THM was the first three-speed, Simpson-geared automatic to use overrunning clutches for both first and second gear reaction, a feature that eliminated the need to coordinate the simultaneous release of a band and application of a clutch to make the gear change. Owing to this feature, as well as the use of a large, multi-plate clutch to provide second gear reaction, the THM is able to withstand very high input torque and an enormous number of shifting cycles, as would be encountered in frequent stop-and-go driving. As a result, it has met with considerable success in commercial vehicle applications.

For , GM changed the nomenclature of their Turbo Hydramatic transmissions — the THM was renamed '3L80' (three forward speeds, longitudinal positioning, and an arbitrary strength rating of 80, the second highest such rating assigned). The 3L80HD was introduced in as the HD unit used in passenger trucks. In , a four-speed overdrive version, the 4LE, replaced the THM in Chevrolet/GMC pickups, vans, SUVs, and commercial vehicles. The 4L80E (and its successor 4L85E) was the first Hydramatic to incorporate electronic controls — almost all of the THM/3L80/3L80HD's components are interchangeable.

Transmission fluid cooler line connections are found on the right-hand side of the THM The lower connection is the cooler feed, and the upper connection is the return.[1] The case is tapped for either self-sealing 1/4"NPT fittings, or 1/2"UNF fittings with a washer seal. 5/16" or 3/8" rigid coolant lines are generally connected via appropriate double-flared adapters.

Four-wheel drive truck applications used 3 various shorter output shafts that coupled with a female transfer case input shaft. Early transfer cases mated directly to the THM with a cast-iron adapter, usually a vertical oval shape. Later models used a circular style iron adapter which is generally considered the stronger of the two. The shortest was used with the NP transfer case.

Gear Ratio
1
2
3
R

THM[edit]

The Turbo Hydra-matic was first used in model cars. It was developed jointly by Buick and Chevrolet to replace the two-speed Super Turbine and aluminum-case Powerglide transmissions. So, although it carries the Turbo Hydra-matic name, the Hydra-matic Division of General Motors had little, if anything, to do with its design. The and its , C, C and B derivatives have been manufactured by Buick in its Flint, Michigan plant, and by Chevrolet in Toledo and Parma, Ohio and Windsor, Ontario.

The THM was also regarded as a 'three speed Powerglide' and during its development, was generally called this. Although it uses the same torque converter as the THM (without variable pitch stator) it has a familial resemblance to the aluminum Powerglide from Chevrolet[according to whom?] and was largely derived from the Chevrolet design. An important difference in the THM compared to the THM is that there is no fixed center support midway through the geartrain; this difference in layout would have permitted the THM to be adapted to the Corvair where the drive and driven ends are the same, but this feature was not exploited. Air-cooled versions (with a baffle on the torque converter and air intakes cast into the bellhousing) of the THM appeared mid in the Chevrolet Vega and Nova 6.

One THM weak point was excessive end-play between the pump and center support and resulting wobble of the direct clutch drum due to both the end play and use of a relatively narrow bushing in the drum. This weak point can be addressed by using an extra thrust washer between the planetary gear and direct clutch to remove the end play and using a wider aftermarket bushing in the direct clutch drum.[according to whom?] Another weak point is the relatively thin center support and the lightweight matching splines in the case. This weakness can be addressed by using an inexpensive aftermarket case saver kit.

Four-wheel drive truck applications for the THM used an iron adapter that mated it to the transfer case directly, similar to the THM The THM adapter was cast iron and used a sliding sleeve to couple the transmission output shaft to the transfer case input shaft with a steel coupler sleeve that was splined to accept both shafts and couple them together. An internal snap ring inside the coupler sleeve controlled the sleeve's position on the shafts, with circular seals in the adapter sealing the transmission from the transfer case.

For the model year, a lock-up torque converter was introduced which coincided with the new EMC control of most GM cars; this version is the THMC, which was phased out in in GM passenger cars for the R4. Chevrolet/GMC trucks and vans used the THMC until The lock-up torque converter was unpopular with transmission builders B&M Racing once marketed a conversion kit for THMCs during the early s until the advent of high stall lock-up torque converters when its overdrive counterpart (THMR4/4L60) were modified. The standard TH is still very popular in drag racing.

THM[edit]

The THM is a derivative of the THM and was introduced for in Chevrolets as a Powerglide replacement. Internally, the THM is a THM without the intermediate clutch pack and with a band adjuster similar to the Powerglide. The THM was usually coupled to smaller displacement engines - the largest a third generation Chevrolet inline six found in the Nova and Camaro ( and 75 model year only). During the model year the THM was phased out of production, replaced with the lighter duty THM It was later reintroduced in as the THMC in the wake of the failure-prone THM/C - the later C was further lightened with the use of a sun gear shell used with the THM but with 3 holes to reduce rotating mass and the low/reverse piston with 8 cutouts.

Gear Ratio
1
2
3
R

THM[edit]

A THM transmission, produced between and

After the OPEC oil embargo, GM developed a lighter-duty version of the THM with lightened materials — primarily alloys in place of ferrous materials (e.g. clutch drums and oil pump) — the Turbo-Hydramatic The THM was first used in models including GM's T-cars (which includes the rebadged Isuzu Gemini sold through Buick dealers as the Buick/Opel by Isuzu), X-cars, and some Isuzu automobiles (Chevrolet LUV and Isuzu P'up). However, this transmission was notorious for its failure rate[citation needed] when used behind too large an engine - the largest being the Oldsmobile &#;L diesel. No multicase bellhousings were used - bellhousing patterns included Chevrolet V8, Buick-Oldsmobile-Pontiac, Vega 4, GM 60 degree pattern (includes the Tech IV), and Isuzu G engine.

It was GM's first transmission which used a throttle valve cable (similar in design to the Chrysler Torqueflite part throttle kickdown linkage) controlling the shift points and part throttle kickdown. This setup was later incorporated into the THMR4.

Starting with the model year, vehicles which had the THM/C as standard equipment were optioned with the THMC, which is a THM without the intermediate clutch pack along with an adjustable band similar to the Chevrolet Powerglide. Also in the model year, the THM received a lockup torque converter, and some internal components (primarily the low/reverse clutch drum and planetary gears) were later shared with the Turbo-Hydramatic R. The low/reverse sprag (roller clutch) assembly was also shared with the Chrysler Torqueflite (also 30, 31, 32RH) and its derivatives e.g. the A and 42RE. THM/Cs were produced until

Gear Ratio
1
2
3
R

THMR[edit]

For the model year, the R was introduced. The components which were prone to failure in the THM were improved, and in the later s this transmission was used with high-power applications — primarily the Buick Grand National and the Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Indy Pace cars. The R was configured with several different torque converters depending on the vehicle application.

Unlike the R4, most Rs have a multicase bellhousing for use with Chevrolet, Buick/Olds/Pontiac (BOP), and Cadillac engines. However, Rs share mounting locations with the TH Since the external dimensions are similar to the TH (overall length, drive shaft yoke spline count/diameter and general size), Rs are often swapped in place of THs in older vehicles to provide an overdrive gear. Early models had a "PRND" shift indicator, while later models used "PRN(D)D21," with the left D identified as the overdrive gear by a square or oval ring.

The THMR can be found in the following vehicles:

The THMR was phased out after ; its final usage was in the GM B-body vehicles.

Gear Ratio
1
2
3
4
R

THMR4 / 4L60 / 4L60E / 4L65E / 4L70E[edit]

See also: GM 4LE transmission

The four-speed Turbo Hydra-Matic R4 was introduced for the model year for use in Chevrolet/GMC vehicles.

In , the Turbo Hydra-Matic R4 was renamed the 4L60. Under the new designation, the "4" stands for the number of forward gears, the "L" for longitudinal applications (rear-wheel-drive), and the "60" is the strength rating (less than the 4L80). "60" is the relative torque value. For example, 80 is stronger than 60, which is stronger than 40, etc. A 4LE can handle more torque than a 4LE. The "E" denotes electronically controlled shifting. The 4L60 however is hydraulically shifted based on governor pressure and throttle valve (TV) cable position. was the last year of widespread usage of the R4 (4L60). The Camaro, Corvette and Typhoon were equipped with the last production R4. The last design change of the R4 was an added checkball to the valve body. In electronic controls were added, and it became the 4LE. The 4L60E is not easily swapped with the 4L60, as the 4L60E depends on a powertrain control module (PCM) to shift.[2] The 4L60E went into service in trucks, vans, and SUVs in and in all RWD passenger cars (Corvette, F and B/D bodies) in In , an updated version — the 4LE, was introduced. Five-pinion planetaries, along with a strength-improved output shaft, were improved to withstand the +&#;lb·ft (+&#;N·m) of torque of the Vortec engine. The 4L70E transmission is the same as a 4L65E with a speed sensor located in the pump.

R4 / 4L60 / 4L60E / 4L65E / 4L70E / technical description[edit]

The Turbo Hydra-Matic R4 can be identified by an oil pan number six shown at General Motors Transmission Pans.

The tailshaft housing is held onto the main case by four bolts (the bolt spacing is similar to the THM), and uses a square-cut o-ring seal, and not a gasket. The typical width of this transmission where it bolts to the engine is 20&#;in (51&#;cm) overall. From the engine/trans mating surface to the cross member mount bolt is &#;in (57&#;cm), and engine/trans surface to output shaft housing mating surface is &#;in (&#;cm) overall, with the tail shaft housing typically measuring &#;in (&#;mm). External dimensions are similar to a THM with a 9-inch tailhousing found in Chevrolet/GMC long wheelbase truck/vans and B-bodies (Bel Air, Impala, Caprice).

Transmission fluid cooler lines on the R4 the bottom fitting on the right side of the transmission is the "out" line to the cooler and the top fitting is for the return line from the cooler. These fittings are &#;in (&#;mm) pipe thread, and can include an adapter from the factory for threaded steel lines in a SAE size. 4L60Es manufactured after use snap-in connections instead of threaded. The original version of the transmission had a spline input shaft (shared with the THMC and R) which was a common failure point. In , the R4 designed for use behind Chevrolet small block V8s received a spline input shaft similar to those found on TH transmissions and which also used a different torque converter than its V6 and L4 engines. Between and , internal components, from the ring gear to the oil pump housing, were updated, ending with the auxiliary valve body for s manufactured after October

In , the 4L60E received a PWM-controlled lockup converter. The early designs simple on or off lockup function while the later design can regulate the apply pressure as to not feel the lock up occur. GM added a fifth solenoid to the valve body, called the PWM solenoid. In , GM introduced a redesigned 4L60E transmission case that incorporated a bolt-on bellhousing and a six-bolt tail housing. This two-piece case style was first seen in and up model S Blazer, S pickup, GMC Jimmy, and GMC Sonoma with the &#;L engine. The majority of and later applications of the 4L60E were two-piece cases (i.e. a removable bellhousing). Both transmissions are the same internally. The non-PWM () style 4L60Es are not interchangeable with PWM-style ( and later) 4L60Es. Also in , GM changed the solenoid to a different style which makes it not interchangeable with any previous models. For the model year GM trucks, there were two versions of the 4L60E: one had a bolt-on bellhousing, the other did not. In total, there are nine different bolt-on bellhousings. The bolt-on bellhousings used on the &#;L V6 and GEN I+ versions of the small-block Chevrolet V8 used the same bellhousing. These had one from to and then a slight redesign for The LSx engines used a longer one to accommodate a redesigned torque converter, commonly referred to as a mm converter, with a longer pilot nose (GM sells an adapter assembly for using the LSx 4L60Es when used with an early engine). There are two bellhousings for the Holden GM models. One for the Corvette drivetrain. One for the S/T platform with L and L engines. And finally, two for the S/T platform with the L, L and L engines (one used in and the other from and on).

Gear Ratio
1
2
3
4
R

R4 / 4L60 / 4L60E / 4L65E /4L70E applications[edit]

[3][4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbo-Hydramatic

Turbo Transmissions

ST Pro-Mod 3 Speed
Gear Ratios  — / - / - / - / - / - / - /

ST Pro-Mod 2 Speed

Gear Ratios  — - - - - - -

(Call for pricing and options)

Turbo With Trans Brake

This transmission is available in 2-speed, 3-speed and 3-speed with 2nd-gear leaver. The 2nd-gear leaver option is something that can give you the best of both worlds. It can be used to race both 1/4 mile and 1/8 mile without major combination changes or it can be used as a tuning aid on tricky track surfaces or when conditions are just not that favorable. 

2 Speed Turbo

This transmission has been tested in very extreme applications and has showed great results with unmatched performance and reliability. Our 2-speed 's are built with all the same no corners cut process. This transmission has yet to reach its full potential as ever evolving technology has brought us to new levels of performance, so has the 2-speed !

3 Speed

Our full-race Turbo starts with a hand-picked specific core. For models with an ultra-bell the case is cut and machined to our specs. For models with standard bells we only use H.D. cases to keep strength in all the critical areas and then machine them accordingly.

From there it's a long no-corners-cut process to build one of the best 3 speeds available. This is where our years of R&D are able to supply you with the best possible combination for your specific application. Our standard-race w/brake is equipped with a cast iron trans brake valve body and can be upgraded to a billet aluminum trans brake valve body w/internal solenoid. 

From there, all gear sets are completely checked and machined to our tolerances with all new Torrington bearings standard throughout. Base models will be equipped with a cast direct drum that is refurbished and fitted with an oversized sprag race, then drilled with additional feed holes. 

We then completely modify the pump and lube circuit to our specifications. All of our transmissions get Raybestos, and Borg Warner clutches throughout. From this point is where the options begin.

Sours: https://www.proformanceracingtransmissions.com/turbotransmissions

Turbo 400 speed 4

Female, hungry womb. Plucking up the courage, I began to squat. - Ay: I whispered.

TH400 Common Problems \u0026 MISTAKES!!!

The sun was already blazing. Then Yana starts a conversation that the trip needs to be paid. Gasoline and all that.

Now discussing:

So, now facing me, arms to the sides (all this is called a check of musculoskeletal functions). I notice that his cock begins to descend smoothly. It's also good: he won't go out of the office with a sticking member. Now the flat feet test: a boy should wet his feet on a damp sponge mat and then leave prints on a black rubber mat.



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