Novation drum station

Novation drum station DEFAULT

Novation DrumStation

British company Novation made their name with the BassStation synth, which offered dance music producers instantly tweakable, analogue‑style synth sounds in a MIDI‑controllable package. The new DrumStation applies the same formula to the de rigueur dance sounds of Roland TR808 and TR909 drum machines. Paul Nagle moves from Station to Station...

I'm surprised someone hasn't brought one out before; a rack device dedicated to reproducing the two most sought‑after drum machines to hit planet Earth in the last million years or so: Roland's TR808 and TR909. Novation have already made lots of friends with their BassStation synth, and have now turned their beady eyes on the drum box market. Using a combination of samples and Analogue Sound Modelling (or ASM if your brain has storage space for the acronym), you can build a kit featuring sounds from both the TR808 and TR909 with all the means of modifying the sounds that has made these drum machines so popular. The one thing lacking is Roland's neat method of programming rhythm patterns, but if you opt for a convenient MIDI rack device instead of the real thing, the chances are you're after the sounds, and not just the 'pose value' of owning the original. So, how closely does it resemble the real thing sonically? The answer is pretty damn close. I managed to borrow a TR808 to try alongside it, and working on an 'eyes closed' method, found the most obvious difference was the way the TR808 was programmed. With Cubase's drum editor, I could get near to the programming style, but I wouldn't attempt to convince the 'original is best' advocates who hold to their beliefs at all costs — even when faced with machines held together by sellotape and bits of string.

Appearances Are Informative

Housed in a 1U rack module, the DrumStation is decked out in a tasteful combination of pale yellow and grey on a black background, and packed with rotary pots, switches and rubber 'calculator‑style' pushbuttons. Although small, these controls are well conceived and accessible. A small red 2‑character display conveys the various messages, program numbers and the like to the outside world. The manual, though excellent, was hardly needed at all — if I had to stoop to a cliché at this early stage in a review, it would be that this is an intuitive machine. On the far left is the master volume, which is notable, because it can be overriden by a MIDI control change 7 message at any time. Presumably Novation have a reason for this, but I found it pretty disconcerting. When I turn something down, I like to be sure it will stay down...

Two buttons to the right of the master volume select which drum kit is to be edited. Since some of the features of the TR808 and 909 differ, those functions pertaining to the TR808 only are marked in grey text. Perhaps the percussion voices unique to the 808 should have been labelled in grey also? Underneath are the headphone socket and memory write‑protect switch.

The DrumStation comes with 25 preset kit memories and a further 15 user memories. This is probably quite sufficient, but if necessary, you can transmit SysEx dumps of single kits or all user kits to an external device. The Select button below the display steps through the various MIDI functions such as transmit and receive channels, utility mode (see separate box for details) and program save or select. Navigation is via the tiny matrix of buttons.

The back panel is generously endowed with stereo outputs and six individual outs. Output routing can be saved as part of a kit, and I found it convenient to think in terms of each output being used for a different effects unit, rather than a different drum (see the Utility mode box for more on this). MIDI In, Thru and Out sockets are of course present, and the DrumStation controls send out all the movements as MIDI controller information, so all tweaks can be recorded into a sequencer, although some parameters (eg. Distortion, Pan and Front Cut) require you to generate the controller information yourself from your sequencer or master keyboard. If you are lucky enough to have a BassStation, Novation thoughtfully provide a conversion table of matched controllers for this purpose. And if that weren't enough, a Roland Sync 24 output (a pre‑MIDI communication protocol) allows triggering of old gear such as my battered TR606, providing you route a MIDI Clock to the DrumStation.

Dream Drums? — The Sounds

Sounds may be auditioned via MIDI or the handy auto trigger facility, which repeats a note at a tempo you set — that's the sort of attention to detail that I find most endearing! Many of the drum voices feature ASM — yes, it's that 'M' word again — and this means that you get to stray from the comfortable path of sample reproduction and delve deeper into the heart of the sound. Few details are available on the modelling process, but in many cases the ASM tone is combined with a sample to produce the finished result (see the chart elsewhere in this article for more details). Six of the instruments are totally sample‑based (with no ASM): the cowbell, maracas, claves, ride cymbal, rim shot and hand clap. These still work effectively, allowing the real sound generation muscle to be reserved for the more complex voices. The manual explains that ASM sounds, unsurprisingly, require more processing power than sample playback, and consequently polyphony is reduced depending on the number and type of drums sounding. This sounds confusing (and it is) but, in practice, it didn't cause me any problems, since I only have the usual complement of hands and feet anyway! I'm told polyphony is "up to 8 notes", not 12 as stated in the manual, and I guess some form of reserve function would have been nice, even as a global setting.

True to the original Roland sounds, the snare drum has four dedicated parameters: Tune, Level, Tone and Snappy — a setting which increases the amount of white noise in the drum body. Using these, you can squeeze plenty of life out of that old 808 snare, even before resorting to external processing. The bass drum has Tune, Level and Decay. For the 909 kit, there is also Attack, and for the 808, there is Tone. The remaining instruments each have Tune and Level knobs, with the toms, hi‑hats and cymbals also featuring a Decay setting. Those instruments which share common controls are selected via a small 3‑position switch, making it a little more difficult to set the relative tuning of the toms and congas.

It is difficult to single out any individual voice for praise. All are excellent renditions of their TR808 and 909 ancestors. If, by some chance, you have never heard these machines, remember that (with the exception of the 909 cymbal, which was a sample anyway), none of the voices actually sounded realistic. Yes, the toms can sometimes be mistaken for someone hitting a cardboard box with a dead fish, and yes, the famous 808 'snare' does sound rather like a yeti stomping through a pile of cornflakes, but what the hell — these sounds were what gave drum machines such a unique musical identity.

Novation have managed to reproduce a bass drum which has great presence, especially with a little front cut and external EQ. The toms sound superb with a touch of distortion, and the crisp, metallic hi‑hats and 'plinky' claves are classics that I will personally never tire of. Both the 808 and 909 snares seem destined to last forever, although thankfully the popularity of the handclap seems to have waned with the passing of disco. Of all the instruments, the only one I could never find a use for was the bloody awful cowbell! If I could vote for an enhancement, it would be to add the sounds of other classic machines such as the Drumulator or TR707 (especially the latter) — but perhaps now that the work has been done to create the modelling technology, it will be possible in the future.

Conclusions

A drum machine without the rhythm‑making section isn't a new idea, but the DrumStation is targetted at a very specific market. So, what's the verdict? Well, anyone with a regular need for these sounds will be more than happy with the DrumStation's version of them. Of course, because many instruments already include some 808 and 909 samples, the average punter might consider the DrumStation an expensive luxury — but I've heard many quality 808 and 909 samples, and none allow such a degree of control over subtle nuances of the sounds. On the other hand, although packing these sounds into a convenient rack is very neat and tidy, you do lose the pattern memories and step‑time input that was for some as important as the sounds themselves. At the end of the day, you have to keep in mind that if you wanted both of the original drum machines and a sync/MIDI box for the 808 too, you would probably have to pay twice the asking price of the DrumStation.

I suppose Novation must have felt faintly sick when they heard about the forthcoming Roland MC303, but there are significant differences between the two, not least that Roland's box omits all the dedicated knobs that make the DrumStation such a joy to use. And with advance orders for the DrumStation apparently numbering well into the thousands, it would seem that plenty of people are fed up with lining the pockets of those who were cunning (or fortunate) enough to pick up real 808s and 909s for a song when everyone was selling theirs!

MIDI Utility Mode

Some intriguing features set the DrumStation apart from its analogue predecessors, and allow you to carry out some things previously only achievable with patience and extreme cleverness. In Utility mode, you select the drum you wish to edit via the plus or minus keys. A nice time‑saving feature is that a quick turn of any knob causes its drum to become the currently selected one — but I'd have liked to have gone one stage further, and been able to select drums for editing by incoming MIDI note (though this could prove problematic for drums that share the same editing controls, like the toms). As it is, you can be auditioning a tom sound from your master keyboard and end up furiously tweaking the DrumStation's front panel controls, wondering why the sound you're playing isn't affected.

Front Cut, which removes up to 99 milliseconds from the start of the drum sound, results in a more muted or rounded character. This is particularly good for removing the 'head' element of a bass drum, enabling you to catch that 'hit in the chest' thud that is so vital in cardiac emergencies and dance music.

Controller/velocity decides whether a particular parameter responds to velocity or other controller data. You can program different elements of each drum so that, for example, the snare's tone and tuning respond to velocity but the 'snappiness' is controlled via MIDI, allowing a great variety of responses. I found I could get great results when triggered from my little Yamaha DD12 drum pads, combined with a continuous pedal mapped to pitch.

The DrumStation can accept or ignore note off information for each drum. This means you can choose whether drums cut off when hit again before their decay time has ended. If you get problems with polyphony, this might be useful and is set on an individual drum basis, like all the other parameters mentioned here.

General MIDI is, happily, almost entirely absent, but it does rear its bland head in the form of a simple remap facility. If you want to quickly integrate an 808 or 909 kit into a GM song, this is the way. Output Set lets you assign any of the drums to anywhere in the stereo panorama or to any of the six individual outputs. This is a generous number, and is invaluable if you wish to process the sounds of kick and snare separately. A useful feature within the Assign Bank function allows you to map a single drum sound over an octave range on the keyboard, although I didn't find a means of overlapping drums on the same note.

Novation have continued with their high standards as far as MIDI spec goes. Practically every DrumStation parameter has its own associated MIDI controller — 100 in total — with which you can coax out every drop of expression from these simple noises. Purists can ignore this if they wish, but I loved the power to take such basic voices and move them as far as possible from the starting point. Distortion adds 'soft‑knee' distortion to the currently selected drum voice, and is particularly good for adding some extra nastiness to snares and kicks. Last amongst the utility functions is a demo which shows off the sonic power of the DrumStation admirably with stereo hi‑hat panning, wacky tuning changes and dynamic kick and snare combinations. I freely admit that none of my own efforts matched this.

Pros

  • Faithful representations of two classic drum machines.
  • Great MIDI control.
  • Sonic tweakability which exceeds even the originals in some cases.

Cons

  • Expensive.
  • Loses the drum machine heart that helped shape the sound in the first place.

Summary

The DrumStation achieves a very realistic simulation of the TR808 and 909, and will therefore do well amongst those determined to have greater control over the sounds than mere samples can provide, but who can't afford the absurd price tag on the original instruments. The MIDI control also allows you to stretch the sonic limitations of these two instruments, but maybe the choice of some different sound sources would result in the DrumStation being added to a few more shopping lists.

Sours: https://www.soundonsound.com/reviews/novation-drumstation

Drum Station Polyphony

This article applies to the Novation Drum Station.

The quoted polyphony for the Drum Station is 8 notes. This is a maximum polyphony. The ASM sounds require more processing power than the sampled sounds. The maximum number of ASM sounds which can be played simultaneously is not straight forward - it depends on the actual sound. As a guide, the amount of % processing power for each sound is:

909                  snare                            25
909                  bass                             14
909                  tom                              32
909                  hats                             22
909                  crash cymbal               10 -  sample replay
909                  ride cymbal                 10 -  sample replay
808                  snare                            24
808                  bass                             15
808                  tom                              18
808                  hats                             10 -  sample replay
808                  crash cymbal               28

So a 909 kick + 909 tom + 808 crash + 808 kick = almost 100% of processing power.

(4 sounds)

Or 808 hat cl + 808 hat op + clave + maraca + rim + ride + 909 crash + 808
clap = 100% of processing power.

(8 sounds)

If you have any further questions or problems please get in touch with Novation support at https://support.novationmusic.com/hc/en-gb/requests/new

Sours: https://support.novationmusic.com/hc/en-gb/articles/115004361049-Drum-Station-Polyphony
  1. Stihl ms271 carburetor
  2. American dad gif
  3. Twin vee 310 performance
  4. Kamakhya devi images

Lives for gear

 
dirtROBOT's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 5 years

Tell me about the novation drumstation!


I would like to hear an owner's POV on the novation drumstation, specifically in these regards:
1)Is the editing limited to the knobs on the front - specifically is there more flexibility allowed to editing each tone?

2)How far beyond 808/909 sounds does it go?

3)Is it fun to use?

A little about my situation: I know there's a hardware drum machine in my short-term future, I don't really care about triggers/pads yet, but I am interested in making somewhat unique sounds and I'll process the crap out of them anwyay. My reading on the drumstation is generally positive, just looking to see if it's praise worthy or full of gotchas.

Thanks!

I'm hoping they are in the process of making a new drumstation...

Lives for gear

 
dirtROBOT's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 5 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by fiddlestickz➡️

I'm hoping they are in the process of making a new drumstation...

Because it's awesome? Or because it's so close to being awesome?

Lives for gear

 
Signifier's Avatar

Why not get an Aira TR-8?

Lives for gear

 
AuldLangSine's Avatar

Yes, you might be interested in the Aira as it has a sequencer that the DrumStation doesn't have. If you do decide to get a DrumStation, make sure it's V2 or the last version they made: The D-Station, which are more reliable. I got a Novation DrumStation only for the TR-808 sounds, and I couldn't be happier with the sound quality and the ways you can adjust the sound easily with those little knobs. I am not saying it sounds exactly like a real 808, but IMHO it is very, very convincing. (Yes, you can get that 808 kick to last a long time and throb deep. And Space Cowbell, anyone?) And anyway, you said you were going to warp the sounds anyway. I have a real TR-909 and use it like others do that I read about on the web. I program the patterns on the 909 and mix 909 kit sounds with 808 kits. I like to use that ticky 808 snare as a hi-hat. For me it's fun to program patterns on that old school Roland drum machine interface and use a blend of 808 and 909 sounds within a single pattern. And you can get a lot more polyphony that way.

I own one (a V2). I also own both a 909 and an 808 (w Kenton MIDI mod) and will say it does a fairly capable job of emulating those boxes. The TR8 is a little more "realistic" to my ears, but a V2 Drumstation is no slouch, especially when it's run through an outboard compressor. Yes it's pretty redundant in my case but I still like the thing for whatever reason.

As far as editing, I have most of the MIDI parameters mapped to my Ableton Push and it works very nicely when I need it. Most people cannot tell the difference between that, a TR8 and an 808 when it's in the middle of a mix.

Lives for gear

 
dirtROBOT's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 5 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by Signifier➡️

Why not get an Aira TR-8?

Does the TR-8 offer much more sound-wise? A sequencer is pretty secondary right now, since I'm not aiming for live performance. I was planning an actual groovebox style sequencer later on, however.

Lives for gear

Never owned it, but someone made a high quality drum kit with it for the Arturia spark and I sampled it on the mpc60. Sounds pretty close to a real 808.

Lives for gear

 
m4thlab's Avatar

Neither here nor there, but topical - I'm pretty sure Mark Bell was using these for one or more of the Bjork tours.

Gear Addict

 
fantomaxis's Avatar

I really liked mine, the separate outputs were awesome, really allowed to treat every inst separately on the mixer (90's OTB setup: mixer+hardware FXs). However the polyphony is limited so just be careful not to stack too many sounds or it won't sound good.
I also had a weird issue when assigning too many inst on one output, the level would reduce dramatically (might have been a pb with my unit though) but since I was generally using one inst per output, it didn't bother me so much.
Overall a good drumkit, with inbuilt distortion, which I enjoyed to harden the kicks or toms and the front cut to cut the start of the sample

Lives for gear

 
Signifier's Avatar

Quote:

Originally Posted by dirtROBOT➡️

Does the TR-8 offer much more sound-wise? A sequencer is pretty secondary right now, since I'm not aiming for live performance. I was planning an actual groovebox style sequencer later on, however.

I am sure the Drumstations have come down in price since Aira. Tr-8 is cool to jam on, sounds very authentic and has reverb and delay. It sends MIDI for all its controls so you can record jams to your DAW as played on the box itself, plus you could use it to play soft synths. The parameters are nearly all automatable via MIDI CCs. The only problem is studio real-estate. The Drumstation is a very compact device, but is not an 'instrument' like the Tr-8.

Gear Maniac

Quote:

Originally Posted by dirtROBOT➡️

I am interested in making somewhat unique sounds

good luck managing that with a simulation of the overused 808 and 909...

Quote:

Originally Posted by dirtROBOT➡️

Does the TR-8 offer much more sound-wise?

I suspect the DrumStation's models of the 808/909 sounds are not so accurate as Roland's own TR-8, but the DrumStation is notable in having more/dedicated individual outputs, allowing instruments of the same type to be played simultaneously (e.g. 2 different handclaps), and responding to MIDI Note Off enabling gated sounds unlike the TR-8. Of course, the TR-8 has more parameters, some reasonably interesting per-step/-instrument effects, and obviously the sequencer. So which you prefer will depend upon your workflow and what you want to do with the various available sounds.

Gear Head

Been using one since about 2001, v2.

On the sounds, they provide a solid base from which to start building a drum track. Yes a compressor helps, as does a splash of reverb along the way and some delay on percussion parts.

The selling points...six independent outs plus stereo, the 909 and 808 kits are independent so you can mix and match easily, front panel knobs (tx/rx midi) - who doesn't love a rack synth with plenty to tweak? Built in distortion adds to the range of sounds, as does front cut (trimming the front of sounds) - both via parameter pages. Velocity can be routed to control parameters other than volume to enable more realistic expression (eg harder hits increase decay).

The problems... Polyphony needs to be managed to avoid drop outs, mine won't export a sys ex dump of the 808 kit without it getting corrupted on reload, might not be a problem for you, but I prefer to drop sys ex files of the sounds I use in a project at the start of the track so I can always recreate stuff, so this one bugs me a bit. Can't think of any others.

The good far outweighs the bad for me. I run it alongside a super bass station rack and they make a nice pair, if you like that sort of sound. Some say that's a bit dated now - but then I'm a bit dated now, so it's all good.

Gear Maniac

Quote:

Originally Posted by xenteq➡️

Velocity can be routed to control parameters other than volume to enable more realistic expression (eg harder hits increase decay).

Forgot about this - very interesting feature of the DrumStation (a.k.a. D-Station for anyone who's not sure).

In contrast, the TR-8 does respond to velocity, but it does this in a single hard-coded way that is kinda cool but can't be configured by the user.

Anyway, both are better in this sense than the originals, which don't have any velocity sensitivity!

Lives for gear

 
dirtROBOT's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 5 years

Ahh thanks for the info re: velocity now that's cool. And thanks to y'all for contributing. I totally agree it's a bread and butter sound but I've always had fun processing old school analog sounds because they have such a rich character as a foundation. Also excited about the multiple outs because that totally works super well for processing obv.

Lives for gear

 
breakmixer's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by Signifier➡️

Why not get an Aira TR-8?

+1, I sold my Drumstation V2 for the TR-8, the 909 is much better on the TR-8 IMO.

However if money is an issue and you can pick up one cheap it's on a OK drum synth/sample player loaded with 808/909 sounds, the percussion side is better, wasn't totally happy with the kick/snare myself of either the 808/909 Drumstation sounds which is why I went TR-8(for 909)/Yocto(for 808) eventually,

however I prefer my analog Yocto 808 drums to the TR-8's(although the TR-8 can get close), the 909 sounds on the TR-8 are good enough for me to not want to look any further ever...I am no 909 expert however, never had my hands on the real one, only know it's sound via records and samples, to me the TR-8 sound bang on 909...

My best mate used to have one, I really loved the rides on it. Did a good job all round, sounded good but I think there are better options these days like a TR-8.


.

Lives for gear

 
Oli's Avatar

Pretty much agree with what has been said already. Any Drum Station can be updated to V2, which is the same as a D-Station. Also worth noting the age of these. My jack sockets are a bit oxidised, and contacts in the phones socket a little loose. I think mine was about half the price of a TR-8. I like it. With on board controls, plus individual outs, processing can be good.

Are you specifically looking for a hardware based percussion? Others to consider may be Blofeld, Nord Modular 1, Micromodular, or SuperNova 2.

Lives for gear

 
dirtROBOT's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 5 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oli➡️

Pretty much agree with what has been said already. Any Drum Station can be updated to V2, which is the same as a D-Station. Also worth noting the age of these. My jack sockets are a bit oxidised, and contacts in the phones socket a little loose. I think mine was about half the price of a TR-8. I like it. With on board controls, plus individual outs, processing can be good.

Are you specifically looking for a hardware based percussion? Others to consider may be Blofeld, Nord Modular 1, Micromodular, or SuperNova 2.

Yeah, I want the physical outputs of a hardware device. I was also poking at the idea of the mfb 522 but I'm looking for something really cheap to start with. I've heard amazing nord modular demos but it's pretty pricey even used.

Off topic, but non 12-bit akai samplers are stupid cheap these days. There is a lot to be said for a $150 Akai S1000.

Edit: I'm not implying that anything mentioned in this thread is wrong or that people are giving bad advice. An old Akai sampler fits many of your needs and can be had for not much these days. Even a floppy disk worth of drum samples is plenty for most songs. Setting up an octave's worth of drum sounds is pretty quick and painless.

Lives for gear

 
dirtROBOT's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 5 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by Whatupdoe?➡️

Off topic, but non 12-bit akai samplers are stupid cheap these days. There is a lot to be said for a $150 Akai S1000.

Yeah I'm not opposed to a sampler, however floppies and scsi and weird DOS software are a little intimidating. I do like the lo-fi and magic voltage dust those beasts sprinkle on samples. I was seriously considering a korg dss-1 at one point. Oh and I just heard the new rhythm wolf demos in the thread, for 200 bucks...jeez. Very tempting.

Lives for gear

 
Oli's Avatar

Agreed about the Nord Modulars. Still not exactly cheap, and the Micro may not have the DSP power for a lot of concurrent percussion.

Maybe also consider Waldorf Rack Attack. Can be reasonably priced. I generally thought there was not much point getting the rack rather than the software, but if you want to process in hardware, that would be a different matter.

Emu Command Stations or Proteus 2500 with percussion ROMs may be worth a look too. These have a sufficient synth engine for doing interesting stuff. Still not really expensive, for what they can do.

Take an S1100 rather than an S1000. Still good price on these, and you get some lovely (though limited) effects. These are rather simple in terms of sample mangling though. Something like a Yamaha A5000 may be more interesting in that regard, or maybe an Akai with USB, and manipulate the samples on a PC. That's basically what my samplist friends were doing back in the day, but just with much less convenient transfers. SCSI to CF card is not too painful, but sounds like you may prefer avoiding this entirely.

Edit - might also consider Kawai XD-5, or Yamaha RM-50 / RY-30. Interfaces not so nice, but capable of much percussion oddity. May need some processing to make them punch a little harder.

I'm not so sure it's fair to call the 808 "dated". Yeah, it's old, but there's a reason people still use that bass drum. I still hear it nearly everywhere, and I've begun using 808 bass again in nearly everything.

I have a V2 with a couple minor issues. It is a decent VA emulation of the 808/909 plus it has some other features that the real thing doesn't do, such as bass drum, hat and clap pitch tuning. It also has built-in distortion and velocity that you have to assign through the menu. Personally, I would say get a TR-8 today unless you really want a slim 1u rack unit. Compared to anything out at the time, it was the best thing you could get hardware that emulated the 808/909.

Are these still being used, despite the tr-8, tr-08 and tr-09?

What sounds are considered decent? The kicks? The snares?

actually very nice. and have the outputs missing on the new ones (other than the forth coming tr8s)

Lives for gear

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wiggen➡️

Are these still being used, despite the tr-8, tr-08 and tr-09?

What sounds are considered decent? The kicks? The snares?

I still use one for the bread and butter sounds alongside a vermona drm1 both sequenced with Engine. They have a lot of control if you have a controller setup to adjust all the parameters

Here for the gear

I love my drum station, the tr8 I also owned but I really didn't think they either replicated the original 808/909 sounds well, nor did I like the sound of the tr8 in and of itself. For me the drum station's 909 kick and hats are really good, 808 snare also solid, not so happy with 808 hats and the kickdrum of the 808 i literally almost never get a decent sound, either too ploppy with shorter decay or too boomy with a longer one, ah well haha.

I'd like to mention that I'm about finished with version 1 of a new open source patch editor for the Drumstation and D-station, which will be out in the next release of Edisyn.

The one item that's been stymieing me is the bank sysex. The Drumstation sysex is entirely undocumented, and to my knowledge there are only two commands: send a drumset patch (with no patch number) and send a bank of drumset patches. And that's it. No patch requests, no patch writing, etc. The single drumset patch sysex command is easy to deduce; but the bank sysex seems to have certain elements compressed in an odd way that is not clear: and to my knowledge no patch editor supports reading it. If anyone has any knowledge about the bank sysex format (and btw Novation themselves don't) I'd greatly appreciate it.

Lives for gear

Quote:

Originally Posted by feijai➡️

I'd like to mention that I'm about finished with version 1 of a new open source patch editor for the Drumstation and D-station, which will be out in the next release of Edisyn.

The one item that's been stymieing me is the bank sysex. The Drumstation sysex is entirely undocumented, and to my knowledge there are only two commands: send a drumset patch (with no patch number) and send a bank of drumset patches. And that's it. No patch requests, no patch writing, etc. The single drumset patch sysex command is easy to deduce; but the bank sysex seems to have certain elements compressed in an odd way that is not clear: and to my knowledge no patch editor supports reading it. If anyone has any knowledge about the bank sysex format (and btw Novation themselves don't) I'd greatly appreciate it.

can you identify roughly the (is it?) 15 user kit presets in the bank dump?
would they be concatenating the menu parameter values? i've forgotten how values are concatenated in a sysex string...
plus there are some globals..

do you need to get at the whole bank, if you can access all the parameters?
Sours: https://gearspace.com/board/

editVOICE system handles 8 channels of polyphony, relative DAC is an AD1859.
The Drumstation is a mix of 2 syntheses:
- VA Analog Sound Modeling ASM - a virtual analog technology
- PCM digital samples.

 

filter edit

asm

 

 

editVA ASM the modeling section is based on an ADSP-2181 microprocessor which calculates 5 classic drum percussions, each with individual following tonal controls:


potKick
- level is the volume
- pitch is the tuning
- decay is the length of the bass drum
- attack: the volume of a shaped pulse at the beginning of the sound


potTom

- level
- pitch
- decay
- switch selector between 3 TOMS each mapped individually

potSnare
- level
- tuning
- snappy: the level of white noise
- tone: is the filter applied to snappy

potCymbal*
- level
- decay
- tune
*ASM cymbal applies only to tr808 emulation, 909 mode uses plain samples.

potHihat
- level
- decay
- tuning

logo

editPCM ROM contains 6 samples: rimshot, cowbell, cymbals (909), maracas, claves and clap- edit is far more static and limited to mix level and pitch tuning:

tone

 

 

editFX a neat distortion/fuzzer helps for some 909 gabber hardcore kick.


fuzz

 

 

editSYNC interface converts incoming Midi clock to Sync 24 for vintage drum machines or sequencer like Roland Mc-202 or Tb-303.




sync 24

 

 

 

effetEDITOR available resource:
- Midiquest (PC/MC / $$$)
- Novation Drum Station iPad editor (IOS, free)

drumstation editor

 

editMEMORY:
- 25 ROM reset kits
- 15 RAM kits
Data can be Midi dump by Midi exclusives.

drumstation memory

 

 

editRELATED FAMILY:

 

effetVST PLUGIN / SAMPLED VERSION there are some free and commercial samples set:

demo AUDIO DEMO

* factory demo has some glitches- known also as polyphony bug


 

 

novation drum station

Sours: https://www.polynominal.com/novation-drum-station/

Station novation drum

How to buy a machine. answered Zhenya. - And you will fuck me like a crucified carcass. - Let's buy a machine for 5-6 positions.

Novation Drum Station Rack 2

Zakus disappeared with unavoidable speed, dragging the cognac along with it. That's good. AND.

You will also be interested:

It was not difficult to get into the house from the back door. He quietly climbed the stairs, heading to his wife's room. As expected, Katerina was not there. Smiling sadly, Prokhor moved to his uncle's office.



21099 21100 21101 21102 21103