Proverbs chapter 15 summary

Proverbs chapter 15 summary DEFAULT

Matthew Henry :: Commentary on Proverbs 15

Chapter 15

Pro 15:1

Solomon, as conservator of the public peace, here tells us,

  • 1. How the peace may be kept, that we may know how in our places to keep it; it is by soft words. If wrath be risen like a threatening cloud, pregnant with storms and thunder, a soft answer will disperse it and turn it away. When men are provoked, speak gently to them, and give them good words, and they will be pacified, as the Ephraimites were by Gideon's mildness (Jdg. 8:1-3); whereas, upon a like occasion, by Jephthah's roughness, they were exasperated, and the consequences were bad, Jdg. 12:1-3. Reason will be better spoken, and a righteous cause better pleaded, with meekness then with passion; hard arguments do best with soft words.
  • 2. How the peace will be broken, that we, for our parts, may do nothing towards the breaking of it. Nothing stirs up anger, and sows discord, like grievous words, calling foul names, as Raca, and Thou fool, upbraiding men with their infirmities and infelicities, their extraction or education, or any thing that lessens them and makes them mean; scornful spiteful reflections, by which men affect to show their wit and malice, stir up the anger of others, which does but increase and inflame their own anger. Rather than lose a jest some will lose a friend and make an enemy.

Pro 15:2

Note,

  • 1. A good heart by the tongue becomes very useful. He that has knowledge is not only to enjoy it, for his own entertainment, but to use it, to use it aright, for the edification of others; and it is the tongue that must make use of it in pious profitable discourse, in giving suitable and seasonable instructions, counsels, and comforts, with all possible expressions of humility and love, and then knowledge is used aright; and to him that has, and thus uses what he has, more shall be given.
  • 2. A wicked heart by the tongue becomes very hurtful; for the mouth of fools belches out foolishness, which is very offensive; and the corrupt communication which proceeds from an evil treasure within (the filthiness, and foolish talking, and jesting) corrupts the good manners of some and debauches them, and grieves the good hearts of others and disturbs them.

Pro 15:3

The great truths of divinity are of great use to enforce the precepts of morality, and none more than this-That the eye of God is always upon the children of men.

  • 1. An eye to discern all, not only from which nothing can be concealed, but by which every thing is actually inspected, and nothing overlooked or looked slightly upon: The eyes of the Lord are in every place; for he not only sees all from on high (Ps. 33:13), but he is every where present. Angels are full of eyes (Rev. 4:8), but God is all eye. It denotes not only his omniscience, that he sees all, but his universal providence, that he upholds and governs all. Secret sins, services, and sorrows, are under his eye.
  • 2. An eye to distinguish both persons and actions. He beholds the evil and the good, is displeased with the evil and approves of the good, and will judge men according to the sight of his eyes, Ps. 1:6; 11:4. The wicked shall not go unpunished, nor the righteous unrewarded, for God has his eye upon both and knows their true character; this speaks as much comfort to saints as terror to sinners.

Pro 15:4

Note,

  • 1. A good tongue is healing, healing to wounded consciences by comforting them, to sin-sick souls by convincing them, to peace and love when it is broken by accommodating differences, compromising matters in variance, and reconciling parties at variance; this is the healing of the tongue, which is a tree of life, the leaves of which have a sanative virtue, Rev. 22:2. He that knows how to discourse will make the place he lives in a paradise.
  • 2. An evil tongue is wounding (perverseness, passion, falsehood, and filthiness there, are a breach in the spirit); it wounds the conscience of the evil speaker, and occasions either guilt or grief to the hearers, and both are to be reckoned breaches in the spirit. Hard words indeed break no bones, but many a heart has been broken by them.

Pro 15:5

Hence,

  • 1. Let superiors be admonished to give instruction and reproof to those that are under their charge, as they will answer it in the day of account. They must not only instruct with the light of knowledge, but reprove with the heat of zeal; and both these must be done with the authority and affection of a father, and must be continued, though the desired effect be not immediately perceived. If the instruction be despised, give reproof, and rebuke sharply. It is indeed against the grain with good-humoured men to find fault, and make those about them uneasy; but better so than to suffer them to go on undisturbed in the way to ruin.
  • 2. Let inferiors be admonished, not only to submit to instruction and reproof (even hardships must be submitted to), but to value them as favours and not despise them, to make use of them for their direction, and always to have a regard to them; this will be an evidence that they are wise and a means of making them so; whereas he that slights his good education is a fool and is likely to live and die one.

Pro 15:6

Note,

  • 1. Where righteousness is riches are, and the comforts of them: In the house of the righteous is much treasure. Religion teaches men to be diligent, temperate, and just, and by these means, ordinarily, the estate is increased. But that is not all: God blesses the habitation of the just, and that blessing makes rich without trouble. Or, if there be not much of this world's goods, yet where there is grace there is true treasure; and those who have but little, if they have a heart to be therewith content, and to enjoy the comfort of that little, it is enough; it is all riches. The righteous perhaps are not themselves enriched, but there is treasure in their house, a blessing in store, which their children after them may reap the benefit of. A wicked worldly man is only for having his belly filled with those treasures, his own sensual appetite gratified (Ps. 17:14); but a righteous man's first care is for his soul and then for his seed, to have treasure in his heart and then in his house, which his relations and those about him may have the benefit of.
  • 2. Where wickedness is, though there may be riches, yet there is vexation of spirit with them: In the revenues of the wicked, the great incomes they have, there is trouble; for there is guilt and a curse; there is pride and passion, and envy and contention; and those are troublesome lusts, which rob them of the joy of their revenues and make them troublesome to their neighbours.

Pro 15:7

This is to the same purport with v. 2, and shows what a blessing a wise man is and what a burden a fool is to those about him. Only here observe further,

  • 1. That we then use knowledge aright when we disperse it, not confine it to a few of our intimates, and grudge it to others who would make as good use of it, but give a portion of this spiritual alms to seven and also to eight, not only be communicative, but diffusive, of this good, with humility and prudence. We must take pains to spread and propagate useful knowledge, must teach some that they may teach others, and so it is dispersed.
  • 2. That it is not only a fault to pour out foolishness, but it is a shame not to disperse knowledge, at least not to drop some wise word or other: The heart of the foolish does not so; it has nothing to disperse that is good, or, if it had, has neither skill nor will to do good with it and therefore is little worth.

Pro 15:8

Note,

  • 1. God so hates wicked people, whose hearts are malicious and their lives mischievous, that even their sacrifices are an abomination to him. God has sacrifices brought him even by wicked men, to stop the mouth of conscience and to keep up their reputation in the world, as malefactors come to a sanctuary, not because it is a holy place, but because it shelters them from justice; but their sacrifices, though ever so costly, are not accepted of God, because not offered in sincerity nor from a good principle; they dissemble with God, and in their conversations give the lie to their devotions, and for that reason they are an abomination to him, because they are made a cloak for sin, ch. 7:14. See Isa. 1:11.
  • 2. God has such a love for upright good people that, though they are not at the expense of a sacrifice (he himself has provided that), their prayer is a delight to him. Praying graces are his own gift, and the work of his own Spirit in them, with which he is well pleased. He not only answers their prayers, but delights in their addresses to him, and in doing them good.

Pro 15:9

This is a reason of what was said in the foregoing verse.

  • 1. The sacrifices of the wicked are an abomination to God, not for want of some nice points of ceremony, but because their way, the whole course and tenour of their conversation, is wicked, and consequently an abomination to him. Sacrifices for sin were not accepted of those that resolved to go on in sin, and were to the highest degree abominable if intended to obtain a connivance at sin and a permission to go on in it.
  • 2. Therefore the prayer of the upright is his delight, because he is a friend of God, and he loves him who, though he have not yet attained, is following after righteousness, aiming at it and pressing towards it, as St. Paul, Phil. 3:13.

Pro 15:10

This shows that those who cannot bear to be corrected must expect to be destroyed.

  • 1. It is common for those who have known the way of righteousness, but have forsaken it, to reckon it a great affront to be reproved and admonished. They are very uneasy at reproof; they cannot, they will not, bear it; nay, because they hate to be reformed, they hate to be reproved, and hate those who deal faithfully and kindly with them. Of all sinners, reproofs are worst resented by apostates.
  • 2. It is certain that those who will not be reproved will be ruined: He that hates reproof, and hardens his heart against it, is joined to his idols; let him alone. He shall die, and perish for ever, in his sins, since he would not be parted from his sins. 2 Chr. 25:16, I know that God has determined to destroy thee, because thou couldst not bear to be reproved; see also ch. 29:1.

Pro 15:11

This confirms what was said (v. 3) concerning God's omnipresence, in order to his judging of evil and good.

  • 1. God knows all things, even those things that are hidden from the eyes of all living: Hell and destruction are before the Lord, not only the centre of the earth, and its subterraneous caverns, but the grave, and all the dead bodies which are there buried out of our sight; they are all before the Lord, all under his eye, so that none of them can be lost or be to seek when they are to be raised again. He knows where every man lies buried, even Moses, even those that are buried in the greatest obscurity; nor needs he any monument with a Hic jacet-Here he lies, to direct him. The place of the damned in particular, and all their torments, which are inexpressible, the state of separate souls in general, and all their circumstances, are under God's eye. The word here used for destruction is Abaddon, which is one of the devil's names, Rev. 9:11. That destroyer, though he deceives us, cannot evade or elude the divine cognizance. God examines him whence he comes (Job 1:7), and sees through all his disguises though he is sly, and subtle, and swift, Job 26:6.
  • 2. He knows particularly the hearts of the children of men. If he sees through the depths and wiles of Satan himself, much more can he search men's hearts, though they be deceitful, since they learned all their fraudulent arts of Satan. God is greater than our hearts, and knows them better than we know them ourselves, and therefore is an infallible Judge of every man's character, Heb. 4:13.

Pro 15:12

A scorner is one that not only makes a jest of God and religion, but bids defiance to the methods employed for his conviction and reformation, and, as an evidence of that,

  • 1. He cannot endure the checks of his own conscience, nor will he suffer it to deal plainly with him: He loves not to reprove him (so some read it); he cannot endure to retire into his own heart and commune seriously with that, will not admit of any free thought or fair reasoning with himself, nor let his own heart smite him, if he can help it. That man's case is sad who is afraid of being acquainted and of arguing with himself.
  • 2. He cannot endure the advice and admonitions of his friends: He will not go unto the wise, lest they should give him wise counsel. We ought not only to bid the wise welcome when they come to us, but to go to them, as beggars to the rich man's door for an alms; but this the scorner will not do, for fear of being told of his faults and prevailed upon to reform.

Pro 15:13

Here,

  • 1. Harmless mirth is recommended to us, as that which contributes to the health of the body, making men lively and fit for business, and to the acceptableness of the conversation, making the face to shine and rendering us pleasant one to another. A cheerful spirit, under the government of wisdom and grace, is a great ornament to religion, puts a further lustre upon the beauty of holiness, and makes men the more capable of doing good.
  • 2. Hurtful melancholy is what we are cautioned against, as a great enemy to us, both in our devotion and in our conversation: By sorrow of the heart, when it has got dominion and plays the tyrant, as it will be apt to do it if be indulged awhile, the spirit is broken and sunk, and becomes unfit for the service of God. The sorrow of the world works death. Let us therefore weep as though we wept not, in justice to ourselves, as well as in conformity to God and his providence.

Pro 15:14

Here are two things to be wondered at:-

  • 1. A wise man not satisfied with his wisdom, but still seeking the increase of it; the more he has the more he would have: The heart of him that has understanding, rejoices so in the knowledge it has attained to that it is still coveting more, and in the use of the means of knowledge is still labouring for more, growing in grace, and in the knowledge of Christ. Si dixisti, Sufficit, periisti-If you say, I have enough, you are undone.
  • 2. A fool well satisfied with his folly and not seeking the cure of it. While a good man hungers after the solid satisfactions of grace, a carnal mind feasts on the gratifications of appetite and fancy. Vain mirth and sensual pleasures are its delight, and with these it can rest contented, flattering itself in these foolish ways.

Pro 15:15

See here what a great difference there is between the condition and temper of some and others of the children of men.

  • 1. Some are much in affliction, and of a sorrowful spirit, and all their days are evil days, like those of old age, and days of which they say they have no pleasure in them. They eat in darkness (Eccl. 5:17) and never eat with pleasure,Job 21:25. How many are the afflictions of the afflicted in this world! Such are not to be censured or despised, but pitied and prayed for, succoured and comforted. It might have been our own lot, or may be yet, merry as we are at present.
  • 2. Others enjoy great prosperity and are of a cheerful spirit; and they have not only good days, but have a continual feast; and if in the abundance of all things they serve God with gladness of heart, and it is oil to the wheels of their obedience (all this, and heaven too), then they serve a good Master. But let not such feast without fear; a sudden change may come; therefore rejoice with trembling.

Pro 15:16-17

Solomon had said in the foregoing verse that he who has not a large estate, or a great income, but a cheerful spirit, has a continual feast; Christian contentment, and joy in God, make the life easy and pleasant; now here he tells us what is necessary to that cheerfulness of spirit which will furnish a man with a continual feast, though he has but little in the world-holiness and love.

  • I. Holiness. A little, if we manage it and enjoy it in the fear of the Lord, if we keep a good conscience and go on in the way of duty, and serve God faithfully with the little we have, will be more comfortable, and turn to a better account, than great treasure and trouble therewith. Observe here,
    • 1. It is often the lot of those that fear God to have but a little of this world. The poor receive the gospel, and poor they still are, Jam. 2:5.
    • 2. Those that have great treasure have often great trouble therewith; it is so far from making them easy that it increases their care and hurry. The abundance of the rich will not suffer them to sleep.
    • 3. If great treasure bring trouble with it, it is for want of the fear of God. If those that have great estates would do their duty with them, and then trust God with them, their treasure would not have so much trouble attending it.
    • 4. It is therefore far better, and more desirable, to have but a little of the world and to have it with a good conscience, to keep up communion with God, and enjoy him in it, and live by faith, than to have the greatest plenty and live without God in the world.
  • II. Love. Next to the fear of God, peace with all men is necessary to the comfort of this life.
    • 1. If brethren dwell together in unity, if they are friendly, and hearty, and pleasant, both in their daily meals and in more solemn entertainments, that will make a dinner of herbs a feast sufficient; though the fare be coarse, and the estate so small that they can afford no better, yet love will sweeten it and they may be as merry over it as if they had all dainties.
    • 2. If there be mutual enmity and strife, though there be a whole ox for dinner, a fat ox, there can be no comfort in it; the leaven of malice, of hating and being hated, is enough to sour it all. Some refer it to him that makes the entertainment; better have a slender dinner and be heartily welcome than a table richly spread with a grudging evil eye.
      • Cum torvo vultu mihi conula nulla placebit,
      • Cum placido vultu conula ulla placet.
      The most sumptuous entertainment, presented with a sullen brow, would offend me; while the plainest repast, presented kindly would delight me.

Pro 15:18

Here is,

  • 1. Passion the great make-bate. Thence come wars and fightings. Anger strikes the fire which sets cities and churches into a flame: A wrathful man, with his peevish passionate reflections, stirs up strife, and sets people together by the ears; he gives occasion to others to quarrel, and takes the occasion that others give, though ever so trifling. When men carry their resentments too far, one quarrel still produces another.
  • 2. Meekness the great peace-maker: He that is slow to anger not only prevents strife, that it be not kindled, but appeases it if it be already kindled, brings water to the flame, unites those again that have fallen out, and by gentle methods brings them to mutual concessions for peace-sake.

Pro 15:19

See here,

  • 1. Whence those difficulties arise which men pretend to meet with in the way of their duty, and to be insuperable; they arise not from any thing in the nature of the duty, but from the slothfulness of those that have really no mind to it. Those that have no heart to their work pretend that their way is hedged up with thorns, and they cannot do their work at all (as if God were a hard Master, reaping where he had not sown), at least that their way is strewed with thorns, that they cannot do their work without a great deal of hardship and danger; and therefore they go about it with as much reluctance as if they were to go barefoot through a thorny hedge.
  • 2. How these imaginary difficulties may be conquered. An honest desire and endeavour to do our duty will, by the grace of God, make it easy, and we shall find it strewed with roses: The way of the righteous is made plain; it is easy to be trodden and not rough, easy to be found, and not intricate.

Pro 15:20

Observe here,

  • 1. To the praise of good children, that they are the joy of their parents, who ought to have joy of them, having taken so much care and pains about them. And it adds much to the satisfaction of those that are good if they have reason to think that they have been a comfort to their parents in their declining years, when evil days come.
  • 2. To the shame of wicked children, that by their wickedness they put contempt upon their parents, slight their authority, and make an ill requital for their kindness: A foolish son despises his mother, that had most sorrow with him and perhaps had too much indulged him, which makes his sin in despising her the more sinful and her sorrow the more sorrowful.

Pro 15:21

Note,

  • 1. It is the character of a wicked man that he takes pleasure in sin; he has an appetite to the bait, and swallows it greedily, and has no dread of the hook, nor feels from it when he has swallowed it: Folly is joy to him; the folly of others is so, and his own much more. He sins, not only without regret, but with delight, not only repents not of it, but makes his boast of it. This is a certain sign of one that is graceless.
  • 2. It is the character of a wise and good man that he makes conscience of his duty. A fool lives at large, walks at all adventures, by no rule, acts with no sincerity or steadiness; but a man of understanding, the eyes of whose understanding are enlightened by the Spirit (and those that have not a good understanding have no understanding), walks uprightly, lives a sober, orderly, regular life, and studies in every thing to conform himself to the will of God; and this is a constant pleasure and joy to him. But what foolishness remains in him, or proceeds from him at any time, is a grief to him, and he is ashamed of it. By these characters we may try ourselves.

Pro 15:22

See here,

  • 1. Of what ill consequence it is to be precipitate and rash, and to act without advice: Men's purposes are disappointed, their measures broken, and they come short of their point, gain not their end, because they would not ask counsel about the way. If men will not take time and pains to deliberate with themselves, or are so confident of their own judgment that they scorn to consult with others, they are not likely to bring any thing considerable to pass; circumstances defeat them which, with a little consultation, might have been foreseen and obviated. It is a good rule, both in public and domestic affairs, to do nothing rashly and of one's own head. Plus vident oculi quam oculus-Many eyes see more than one. That often proves best which was least our own doing.
  • 2. How much it will be for our advantage to ask the advice of our friends: In the multitude of counsellors (provided they be discreet and honest, and will not give counsel with a spirit of contradiction) purposes are established. Solomon's son made no good use of this proverb when he acquiesced not in the counsel of the old men, but because he would have a multitude of counsellors, regarding number more than weight, advised with the young men.

Pro 15:23

Note,

  • 1. We speak wisely when we speak seasonably: The answer of the mouth will be our credit and joy when it is pertinent and to the purpose, and is spoken in due season, when it is needed and will be regarded, and, as we say, hits the joint. Many a good word comes short of doing the good it might have done, for want of being well-timed. Nor is any thing more the beauty of discourse than to have a proper answer ready off-hand, just when there is occasion for it, and it comes in well.
  • 2. If we speak wisely and well, it will redound to our own comfort and to the advantage of others: A man has joy by the answer of his mouth; he may take a pleasure, but may by no means take a pride, in having spoken so acceptably and well that the hearers admire him and say, "How good is it, and how much good does it do!"

Pro 15:24

The way of wisdom and holiness is here recommended to us,

  • 1. As very safe and comfortable: It is the way of life, the way that leads to eternal life, in which we shall find the joy and satisfaction which will be the life of the soul, and at the end of which we shall find the perfection of blessedness. Be wise and live. It is the way to escape that misery which we cannot but see ourselves exposed to, and in danger of. It is to depart from hell beneath, from the snares of hell, the temptations of Satan, and all his wiles, from the pains of hell, that everlasting destruction which our sins have deserved.
  • 2. As very sublime and honourable: It is above. A good man sets his affections on things above, and deals in those things. His conversation is in heaven; his way leads directly thither; there his treasure is, above, out of the reach of enemies, above the changes of this lower world. A good man is truly noble and great; his desires and designs are high, and he lives above the common rate of other men. It is above the capacity and out of the sight of foolish men.

Pro 15:25

Note,

  • 1. Those that are elevated God delights to abase, and commonly does it in the course of his providence: The proud, that magnify themselves, bid defiance to the God above them and trample on all about them, are such as God resists and will destroy, not them only, but their houses, which they are proud of and are confident of the continuance and perpetuity of. Pride is the ruin of multitudes.
  • 2. Those that are dejected God delights to support, and often does it remarkably: He will establish the border of the poor widow, which proud injurious men break in upon, and which the poor widow is not herself able to defend and make good. It is the honour of God to protect the weak and appear for those that are oppressed.

Pro 15:26

The former part of this verse speaks of thoughts, the latter of words, but they come all to one; for thoughts are words to God, and words are judged of by the thoughts from which they proceed, so that,

  • 1. The thoughts and words of the wicked, which are, like themselves, wicked, which aim at mischief, and have some ill tendency or other, are an abomination to the Lord; he is displeased at them and will reckon for them. The thoughts of wicked men, for the most part, are such as God hates, and are an offence to him, who not only knows the heart and all that passes and repasses there, but requires the innermost and uppermost place in it.
  • 2. The thoughts and words of the pure, being pure like themselves, clean, honest, and sincere, are pleasant words and pleasant thoughts, well-pleasing to the holy God, who delights in purity. It may be understood both of their devotions to God (the words of their mouth and the meditations of their heart, in prayer and praise, are acceptable to God,Ps. 19:14; 69:13) and of their discourses with men, tending to edification. Both are pleasant when they come from a pure, a purified, heart.

Pro 15:27

Note,

  • 1. Those that are covetous entail trouble upon their families: He that is greedy of gain, and therefore makes himself a slave to the world, rises up early, sits up late, and eats the bread of carefulness, in pursuit of it-he that hurries, and puts himself and all about him upon the stretch, in business, frets and vexes at every loss and disappointment, and quarrels with every body that stands in the way of his profit-he troubles his own house, is a burden and vexation to his children and servants. He that, in his greediness of gain, takes bribes, and uses unlawful ways of getting money, leaves a curse with what he gets to those that come after him, which sooner or later will bring trouble into the house, Hab. 2:9, 10.
  • 2. Those that are generous as well as righteous entail a blessing upon their families: He that hates gifts, that shakes his hands from holding the bribes that are thrust into his hand to pervert justice and abhors all sinful indirect ways of getting money-that hates to be paltry and mercenary, and is willing, if there be occasion, to do good gratis-he shall live; he shall have the comfort of life, shall live in prosperity and reputation; his name and family shall live and continue.

Pro 15:28

Here is,

  • 1. A good man proved to be a wise man by this, that he governs his tongue well; he that does so the same is a perfect man,Jam. 3:2. It is part of the character of a righteous man that being convinced of the account he must give of his words, and of the good and bad influence of them upon others, he makes conscience of speaking truly (it is his heart that answers, that is, he speaks as he thinks, and dares not do otherwise, he speaks the truth in his heart,Ps. 15:2), and of speaking pertinently and profitably, and therefore he studies to answer, that his speech may be with grace, Neh. 2:4; 5:7.
  • 2. A wicked man is proved to be a fool by this, that he never heeds what he says, but his mouth pours out evil things, to the dishonour of God and religion, his own reproach, and the hurt of others. Doubtless that is an evil heart which thus overflows with evil.

Pro 15:29

Note,

  • 1. God sets himself at a distance from those that set him at defiance: The wicked say to the Almighty, Depart from us, and he is, accordingly, far from them; he does not manifest himself to them, has no communion with them, will not hear them, will not help them, no, not in the time of their need. They shall be for ever banished from his presence and he will behold them afar off. Depart from me, you cursed.
  • 2. He will draw nigh to those in a way of mercy who draw nigh to him in a way of duty: He hears the prayer of the righteous, accepts it, is well pleased with it, and will grant an answer of peace to it. It is the prayer of a righteous man that avails much,Jam. 5:16. He is nigh to them, a present help, in all that they call upon him for.

Pro 15:30

Two things are here pronounced pleasant:-

  • 1. It is pleasant to have a good prospect to see the light of the sun (Eccl. 11:7) and by it to see the wonderful works of God, with which this lower world is beautified and enriched. Those that want the mercy know how to value it; how would the light of the eyes rejoice their hearts! The consideration of this should make us thankful for our eyesight.
  • 2. It is more pleasant to have a good name, a name for good things with God and good people; this is as precious ointment,Eccl. 7:1. It makes the bones fat; it gives a secret pleasure, and that which is strengthening. It is also very comfortable to hear (as some understand it) a good report concerning others; a good man has no greater joy than to hear that his friends walk in the truth.

Pro 15:31

Note,

  • 1. It is the character of a wise man that he is very willing to be reproved, and therefore chooses to converse with those that, both by their words and example, will show him what is amiss in him: The ear that can take the reproof will love the reprover. Faithful friendly reproofs are here called the reproofs of life, not only because they are to be given in a lively manner, and with a prudent zeal (and we must reprove by our lives as well as by our doctrine), but because, where they are well-taken, they are means of spiritual life, and lead to eternal life, and (as some think) to distinguish them from rebukes and reproaches for well-doing, which are rather reproofs of death, which we must not regard nor be influenced by.
  • 2. Those that are so wise as to bear reproof well will hereby be made wiser (ch. 9:9), and come at length to be numbered among the wise men of the age, and will have both ability and authority to reprove and instruct others. Those that learn well, and obey well, are likely in time to teach well and rule well.

Pro 15:32

See here,

  • 1. The folly of those that will not be taught, that refuse instruction, that will not heed it, but turn their backs upon it, or will not hear it, but turn their hearts against it. They refuse correction (margin); they will not take it, no, not from God himself, but kick against the pricks. Those that do so despise their own souls; they show that they have a low and mean opinion of them, and are in little care and concern about them, considered as rational and immortal, instruction being designed to cultivate reason and prepare for the immortal state. The fundamental error of sinners is undervaluing their own souls; therefore they neglect to provide for them, abuse them, expose them, prefer the body before the soul, and wrong the soul to please the body.
  • 2. The wisdom of those that are willing, not only to be taught, but to be reproved: He that hears reproof, and amends the faults he is reproved for, gets understanding, by which his soul is secured from bad ways and directed in good ways, and thereby he both evidences the value he has for his own soul and puts true honour upon it.

Pro 15:33

See here how much it is our interest, as well as duty,

  • 1. To submit to our God, and keep up a reverence for him: The fear of the Lord, as it is the beginning of wisdom, so it is the instruction and correction of wisdom; the principles of religion, closely adhered to, will improve our knowledge, rectify our mistakes, and be the best and surest guide of our way. An awe of God upon our spirits will put us upon the wisest counsels and chastise us when we say or do unwisely.
  • 2. To stoop to our brethren, and keep up a respect for them. Where there is humility there is a happy presage of honour and preparative for it. Those that humble themselves shall be exalted here and hereafter.

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Proverbs 15 – The Words of the Wise

Proverbs 15:1

A soft answer turns away wrath,
But a harsh word stirs up anger.

a. A soft answer turns away wrath: When people come to us in wrath, we are often tempted to be harsh in response. Wisdom shows us the value of a soft answer, one without sharp edges or points. That kind of answer can actually turn away wrath.

i. “Soft speech is like oil on bruised skin to soften and heal it (cf. Judges 8:1-3); painful speech has the effect of oil poured on fire (cf. 1 Kings 12:1-16).” (Waltke)

ii. “Pride and passion on both sides strike together like two flints. We indulge in sarcasm as if we would rather lose a friend than miss scoring a point in the argument. All this the world excuses. But the Gospel sets before us our Savior’s example and imbues us with his spirit; so we should be careful not to provoke a chafed or wounded spirit.” (Bridges)

b. A harsh word stirs up anger: A harsh response to wrath often only stirs up more anger. It may feel good at the moment but ends up making the situation worse, not better.

i. “Many conflicts arise not because the issues separating the parties are so great but because of the temperaments people bring to a confrontation.” (Garrett)

ii. “How was Saul enkindled by Doeg, and David by Nabal’s currishness! Rehoboam, with one churlish breath, lost ten tribes.” (Trapp)

iii. “Gideon in Judges 8:1-3 is a classic example of the soft answer that brings peace, whereas Jephthah illustrates the harsh answer that leads to war (Judges 12:1-6).” (Ross)

Proverbs 15:2

The tongue of the wise uses knowledge rightly,
But the mouth of fools pours forth foolishness.

a. The tongue of the wise uses knowledge rightly: The wise man or woman will show their right use of knowledge by the words they say. The words of their tongue demonstrate their wisdom.

i. Uses knowledge rightly: “Expressing what he knows prudently and gracefully; taking due care both what, and when, and to whom, and in what manner he speaks.” (Poole)

ii. “This is very difficult to know: – when to speak, and when to be silent; what to speak, and what to leave unspoken; the manner that is best and most suitable to the occasion, the subject, the circumstances, and the persons…. Even wise counsel may be foolishly given.” (Clarke)

b. The mouth of fools pours forth foolishness: A fool will be revealed by their words. It isn’t enough for a man or woman to claim they have wisdom in their heart or mind; what they say proves either their wisdom or folly.

i. Pours forth: “Hebrew, Bubbleth it out; blurteth it out, as a fountain casteth out its waters, with a great force and swiftness.” (Trapp)

Proverbs 15:3

The eyes of the Lord are in every place,
Keeping watch on the evil and the good.

a. The eyes of the Lord are in every place: Wisdom understands that we are always under the eye of God. He sees us in every place, even when we are hidden to human eyes.

i. The eyes of the Lord: “The eyes of Christ are ‘as a flaming fire.’ [Revelation 1:14] And the school of nature teacheth that the fiery eye needs no outward light, that sees extra mittendo, by sending out a ray.” (Trapp)

ii. “So how will I meet these eyes? Will I meet them as a rebel or as a child?” (Bridges)

b. Keeping watch on the evil and the good: God takes note of both the evil and the good. He will deal with the evil according to His righteous judgment, and He will bless and reward the good. Among men, evil is often unpunished and good is often unrewarded – but God sees and notes all.

i. We might say that God has night vision and sees all that happens under the cover of darkness.

ii. Keeping watch: “The word employed describes a very active and purposeful seeing. The statement is far more than that God sees; it is that He is investigating, observing…. He is keeping watch upon the evil. It is never out of His sight. It loves the darkness rather than the light, but He sees as well in the darkness as in the light.” (Morgan)

iii. And the good: “The Lord’s eyes also see the good. He sees them in outward destitution, in secret retirement, in deep affliction. He pierces the prison walls. He is with them in the furnace and in the storm.” (Bridges)

Proverbs 15:4

A wholesome tongue is a tree of life,
But perverseness in it breaks the spirit.

a. A wholesome tongue is a tree of life: Good words are like a tree that continually brings life from its shade and fruit. Our words have the power to do far more good than we often think.

b. Perverseness in it breaks the spirit: If someone’s tongue is perverse (twisted, crooked, corrupt) instead of wholesome, their words will break the spirit of others. Our words have the power to do far more harm than we often think.

Proverbs 15:5

A fool despises his father’s instruction,
But he who receives correction is prudent.

a. A fool despises his father’s instruction: Proverbs is written as advice from a father to his children. A fool would despise the wisdom that comes from a godly parent and God’s word.

i. “One’s attitude toward parental teaching will determine one’s lifelong attitude toward authority and instruction.” (Garrett)

b. He who receives correction is prudent: Learning wisdom is more than learning facts; it is to receive correction. If what we learn only confirms what we already know, it probably isn’t wisdom we are learning.

Proverbs 15:6

In the house of the righteous there is much treasure,
But in the revenue of the wicked is trouble.

a. In the house of the righteous there is much treasure: Because wisdom and godliness tend to bring prosperity, this is generally true of material treasure. Thankfully, the treasure in the house of the righteous isn’t only material; the greater treasure is spiritual.

i. “Every righteous man is a rich man, whether he hath more or less of the things of this life.” (Trapp)

b. In the revenue of the wicked is trouble: Even what the wicked man or woman earns (the revenue) can be a problem. Instead of treasure, they have trouble.

i. Revenue of the wicked: “Though he may obtain great revenues, yet they are attended with much trouble and vexation; either because they are strangely blasted and taken from them, or because they are imbittered to them by their own insatiable desires, or tormenting cares and fears, or the horrors of their guilty consciences, or by divers other ways.” (Poole)

Proverbs 15:7

The lips of the wise disperse knowledge,
But the heart of the fool does not do so.

a. The lips of the wise disperse knowledge: The wise man or woman will spread (disperse) knowledge and wisdom. It is within them and will be given to others by the words they say.

b. The heart of the fool does not do so: Since wisdom isn’t in the heart of the fool, it won’t be on their lips either. They are unable to spread the blessing of wisdom to others through their words.

Proverbs 15:8

The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord,
But the prayer of the upright is His delight.

a. The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord: Without godliness, religious ritual, such as sacrifice, can be an abomination to God. As Samuel said to Saul, Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice (1 Samuel 15:22).

b. The prayer of the upright is His delight: The godly man or woman delights God with their prayer. The wicked one goes to the trouble and expense of offering a sacrifice, but it does not delight God in the way the prayer of the upright does.

Proverbs 15:9

The way of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord,
But He loves him who follows righteousness.

a. The way of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord: God rejects the religious ceremonies of the wicked (Proverbs 15:8); therefore, much more does God consider the sinful life of the wicked as an abomination.

b. He loves him who follows righteousness: The one who lives and follows righteousness does so in surrender and love to God, and they do what Jude advised; they keep themselves in the love of God (Jude 21).

Proverbs 15:10

Harsh discipline is for him who forsakes the way,
And he who hates correction will die.

a. Harsh discipline is for him who forsakes the way: When a man or woman departs from God’s path (the way), in mercy God will send them harsh discipline. This discipline is a warning and opportunity to change one’s ways.

b. He who hates correction will die: The one who rejects God’s loving and merciful correction seals his own fate and sets his own course. They are on the way of death and will remain there.

i. “He that is embittered by rebukes, and not bettered by chastisements, shall die…they that will not obey that sweet command, ‘Come unto me all ye that labour and are heavy laden,’ shall one day have no other voice to obey but that terrible [word],‘Go ye cursed into everlasting flames.’” (Trapp)

ii. “The one who hatescorrectionwill die (see Proverbs 5:23; 10:21) an eternal death without God, the tragic and inevitable end of apostates who have become hardened against truth.” (Waltke)

Proverbs 15:11

Hell and Destruction are before the Lord;
So how much more the hearts of the sons of men.

a. Hell and Destruction are before the Lord: These two destinies are symbolically pictured as persons who are before the Lord to serve His purpose. The sobering truth is that God has a plan and a purpose for both Hell and Destruction.

i. “Sheol and Abaddon represent the remote underworld and all the mighty powers that reside there (see Proverbs 27:20; Job 26:6; Psalm 139:8; Amos 9:2; Revelation 9:11).” (Ross)

ii. God can see what we cannot. Hell and Destruction are presently invisible to us, but they are before the Lord. If we could see Hell and Destruction, we would think and live much differently. “We, silly fishes, see one another jerked out of the pond of life by the hand of death; but we see not the frying pan and the fire that they are cast into, that ‘die in their sins,’ and refuse to be reformed.” (Trapp)

iii. “God’s surveillance extends to the realm of the dead in the depths of the earth, as remote from heaven as possible, and he will be met in every corner of this pitch-black place shrouded in mystery and secrecy and of no apparent value to humanity or God.” (Waltke)

b. How much more the hearts of the sons of men: If God has a plan and a purpose for those two destinies, it is much more true that He has a plan and purpose for humanity (the sons of men).

i. “This is a simple method of drawing attention to God’s perfect knowledge of all the deepest and hidden things. If that which is most full of mystery to us is perfectly known to Him, how well He must know our hearts.” (Morgan)

ii. “And not only so, but we have known cases in which the thoughts of men have been revealed from the pulpit. I have sometimes seen persons nudge with their elbow, because they have got a smart hit, and I have heard them say, when they went out, ‘That is just what I said to you when I went in at the door.’ ‘Ah!’ says the other, ‘I was thinking of the very thing he said, and he told me of it.’ Now, if God thus proves his own Omniscience by helping his poor, ignorant servant, to state the very thing, thought and done, when he did not know it, then it must remain decisively proved that God does know everything that is secret, because we see he tells it to men, and enables them to tell it to others.” (Spurgeon)

Proverbs 15:12

A scoffer does not love one who corrects him,
Nor will he go to the wise.

a. A scoffer does not love one who corrects him: Because the fool and the scoffer hate correction, they will hate (not love) the one who brings it.

i. Does not love one who corrects him: “As Ahab did Micaiah; Herodias, John Baptist; the Pharisees, our Saviour.” (Trapp)

b. Nor will he go to the wise: In rejecting correction, the scoffer rejects wisdom and will remain trapped in his folly.

Proverbs 15:13

A merry heart makes a cheerful countenance,
But by sorrow of the heart the spirit is broken.

a. A merry heart makes a cheerful countenance: If someone has happiness and joy, it should be seen on their face. They should have a cheerfulcountenance.

i. “This cheerfulness, however, is very different from the noisy mirth of the ungodly. The word cheerful was often used by the old writers. It was Foxe’s favorite description of the holy joy of the martyrs.” (Bridges)

b. By sorrow of heart the spirit is broken: Those who have deep sorrow of heart will display their broken spirit. We can observe both the happy and the sad with understanding and sympathy for both the merry heart and those with sorrow of heart.

i. “The words used here stress the pain and the depression with a note of despair.” (Ross)

Proverbs 15:14

The heart of him who has understanding seeks knowledge,
But the mouth of fools feeds on foolishness.

a. The heart of him who has understanding seeks knowledge: The scoffer avoids wisdom’s correction (Proverbs 15:12), but the one with understanding and wisdom in his or her heart will seek after more wisdom.

i. Seeks knowledge: “As a hungry man seeks meat, or a covetous man gold, the more he hath, the more he desires.” (Trapp)

b. The mouth of fools feeds on foolishness: In this sense, the normal course of humanity is that the wise become wiser and that fools feed on more foolishness.

i. “Let fools feed on foolishness, as swine do on swill, as flies do on blotches, as carrion kites do on stinking carcasses.” (Trapp)

Proverbs 15:15

All the days of the afflicted are evil,
But he who is of a merry heart has a continual feast.

a. All the days of the afflicted are evil: To live in days of affliction is to know the trouble and evil of life and this fallen world.

b. He who is of a merry heart has a continual feast: When a merry heart instead of an afflicted heart marks our attitude towards life, there is a sense of continual bounty and enjoyment.

i. A continual feast: “Hath constant satisfaction and delight in all conditions, yea, even in affliction.” (Poole)

ii. “It is a full feast, a lasting feast; not for a day, as that of Nabal, not for seven days, as that of Samson, no, nor of hundred and eighty days, as that of Ahasuerus, but a durable continual feast, without intermission of solace, or interruption of society.” (Trapp)

Proverbs 15:16

Better is a little with the fear of the Lord,
Than great treasure with trouble.

a. Better is a little with the fear of the Lord: Especially in our materialistic and consumer age, we constantly want more, and we fear living with little. Yet life is better with little if lived with reverence and honor to God (the fear of the Lord).

i. “If saints be sad, it is because they are too busy here below, and, Martha-like, troubled about many things, with neglect of that one thing necessary.” (Trapp)

b. Than great treasure with trouble: To have great treasure and great trouble is not a good life. Because the fear of the Lord spares us from much trouble, it is better to have that than great treasure.

i. “Riches, though well got, are but as manna, those that gathered less had no want, and those that gathered more, it was but a trouble and annoyance to them.” (Trapp)

Proverbs 15:17

Better is a dinner of herbs where love is,
Than a fatted calf with hatred.

a. Better is a dinner of herbs where love is: The presence of love makes up for a lot. We can live on a humble diet but can never flourish without love.

i. “Riches and poverty are more in the heart than in the hand. He is wealthy who is contented. He is poor who wants more.” (Bishop Hall, cited in Bridges)

b. Than a fatted calf with hatred: One may enjoy the extravagant abundance of a fatted calf, but hatred will spoil it all. Nothing really makes up for a lack of love.

i. “A fattened ox (see Proverbs 7:22; 14:4) represents the king of domesticated animals at its very best and functions as a synecdoche for the finest foods (cf. Luke 15:23).” (Waltke)

Proverbs 15:18

A wrathful man stirs up strife,
But he who is slow to anger allays contention.

a. A wrathful man stirs up strife: When strife is stirred up, it doesn’t happen by accident. Usually, the cause is a wrathful man or woman who stirs up strife.

b. He who is slow to anger allays contention: The wise man or woman is slow to anger, and they have a way of bringing peace and smoothing over contention instead of stirring up strife.

Proverbs 15:19

The way of the lazy man is like a hedge of thorns,
But the way of the upright is a highway.

a. The way of the lazy man is like a hedge of thorns: Those who are lazy may not see it in themselves. Often, they may more easily see the result of their laziness, which is a life filled with constant trouble and irritations (like a hedge of thorns).

i. “Because he is slothful, he imagines ten thousand difficulties in the way which cannot be surmounted; but they are all the creatures of his own imagination, and that imagination is formed by his sloth.” (Clarke)

ii. Many times, Proverbs reminds us of what serious sin laziness is.

· Laziness is theft – you live off the work of others.

· Laziness is selfishness – you live for yourself and comfort.

· Laziness is neglect of duty – you don’t do what you should.

iii. In his sermon titled The Hedge of Thorns and the Plain Way, Charles Spurgeon used Proverbs 15:19 in a spiritual sense, speaking to those who are spiritually lazy: “The spiritual sluggard does not believe after that practical fashion. He says, ‘It is true;’ but he acts as if it were false. He is too much a sluggard to become an infidel; he is too lethargic to argue against the truth which condemns him; he nods assent, it is the nod of sleep.” Spurgeon went on to describe the life of the spiritually lazy man:

· His spiritual life is lived as if he were asleep.

· He once gave an effort to forsake sin but did not follow through.

· His spiritual life is a hard way, full of thorns.

· Spiritual things seem long and dreary.

· The Christian life is full of thorny perplexities, problems, and misery.

· He may find that his way to heaven is blocked.

b. The way of the upright is a highway: The wise man or woman – upright and hardworking before the Lord – does not know the same constant troubles and irritations of life that the lazy man must endure. Life for the upright is much smoother and more efficient in its progress.

i. “Unthinking persons suppose that the sluggard lives a happy life, and travels an easy road. It is not so…. Labour of a holy sort has ten thousand times more joy in it than purposeless leisure.” (Spurgeon)

Proverbs 15:20

A wise son makes a father glad,
But a foolish man despises his mother.

a. A wise son makes a father glad: A father is made glad by a wise son, both for the blessing of knowing there is good for the son, and because it vindicates the father’s trust in God and training of the son in wisdom.

b. A foolish man despises his mother: The foolish man or woman brings disgrace to his parents, and their rejection of the parents’ wisdom shows they despise their mother and father.

i. “Tragically the person who needs their instruction, out of his exaggerated opinion of his self-importance, feels that he is better than his godly parents and so is intractable and incorrigible.” (Waltke)

Proverbs 15:21

Folly is joy to him who is destitute of discernment,
But a man of understanding walks uprightly.

a. Folly is joy to him who is destitute of discernment: For the fool, his foolishness (folly) is something to take pleasure in. He only hates his folly when they have to pay the bitter consequences of it. Otherwise, it is joy to him.

b. A man of understanding walks uprightly: With wisdom, our life is ordered and upright. The wise man or woman finds joy in what is good and upright.

i. “His sincerity supplies him with serenity; the joy of the Lord, as an oil of gladness, makes him lithe and nimble in ways of holiness.” (Trapp)

Proverbs 15:22

Without counsel, plans go awry,
But in the multitude of counselors they are established.

a. Without counsel, plans go awry: The difference between success and failure can often be found in those who plan with or without counsel. Wisdom understands that other people also have wisdom.

i. “Our wisdom lies in self-distrust, or at least allowing for the possibility that we may often be wrong! So it is most expedient, especially in important matters, to seek experienced counsel.” (Bridges)

b. In the multitude of counselors they are established: Normally there is more insight from many people than from one. Getting many eyes to see and many minds to think about plans can often see those plans established and successful.

Proverbs 15:23

A man has joy by the answer of his mouth,
And a word spoken in due season, how good it is!

a. A man has joy by the answer of his mouth: Right and wise words have the potential and power to bring great joy to one’s self and to others.

b. A word spoken in due season, how good it is: The value in a good word is often not only found in its content but also in its timing. The right word at the right time (in due season) is a powerful force for good.

i. “This proverb sets forth the satisfaction of being able to say the right thing at the right moment.” (Morgan)

Proverbs 15:24

The way of life winds upward for the wise,
That he may turn away from hell below.

a. The way of life winds upward for the wise: One of the great benefits of a life of wisdom is that, generally, life gets better as the years go on. The progress of their life winds upward and not down; they move from glory to glory (2 Corinthians 3:18).

b. That he may turn away from hell below: The progress of a wise life isn’t just in what it heads toward (upward), but also in what it moves away from. Heaven becomes closer and hell becomes further distant behind.

i. Upward…below: “A recognition of the two forces of which man is ever conscious the upward pull and the downward pull with a declaration that wisdom consists in answering the upward.” (Morgan)

ii. From hell below: “Or, from the lowermost hell; not from the grave, as this word is elsewhere used, for no wisdom can prevent that; but from hell properly so called, as this word is elsewhere used, as hath been formerly observed.” (Poole)

Proverbs 15:25

The Lord will destroy the house of the proud,
But He will establish the boundary of the widow.

a. The Lord will destroy the house of the proud: Those who choose pride set themselves against God (James 4:6 and 1 Peter 5:5), and God will set Himself against them. They and their house will be targets of God’s destruction.

b. He will establish the boundary of the widow: The widow is the picture and representative of a humble, needy person who looks to and depends on God. She represents the opposite of the proud, and God takes special care of those who humbly depend on Him.

i. “When they were too weak to have a voice, God spoke for the poor and needy through Moses (cf. Deuteronomy 19:14; 27:17), the prophets (Hosea 5:10), and the sages (Job 24:2; Proverbs 15:25; 22:28).” (Waltke)

ii. “The story of Naboth (1 Kings 21) illuminates the saying; but it is relevant to all kinds of exploitation.” (Kidner)

Proverbs 15:26

The thoughts of the wicked are an abomination to the Lord,
But the words of the pure are pleasant.

a. The thoughts of the wicked are an abomination to the Lord: Wickedness doesn’t begin with actions; it begins in the heart and thoughts. There is certainly a sense in which our actions are more important than our thoughts, but our actions begin in our thoughts, so what we think is also important to God.

i. “How little most people think they are responsible for their thoughts. They live as if they were on their own and so can indulge themselves without any restraints.” (Bridges)

ii. “Thoughts…in the first line, mean ‘plans’, and the contrasted language of the second line emphasizes the fact that such plans are hateful to God even before they issue in words or deeds.” (Kidner)

b. The words of the pure are pleasant: Solomon knew that a person’s thoughts would be ultimately revealed by their words. God hears the words of the pure and is pleased, contrasting with the thoughts of the wicked.

Proverbs 15:27

He who is greedy for gain troubles his own house,
But he who hates bribes will live.

a. He who is greedy for gain troubles his own house: Many of those who are greedy for gain justify it with the excuse that they do it for their family. This is not wise, because being greedy for gain will ultimately bring trouble to one’s house.

i. “The ‘greedy man’ is the one who wants a big cut, who is in a hurry to get rich, and who is not particular how it happens.” (Ross)

ii. “The Papists propose rewards to such as shall relinquish the Protestant religion and turn to them…. Thus they tempted Luther, but he would not be hired to go to hell; and thus they tempted that noble Marquis of Vicum, nephew to Pope Paul V, who left all for Christ and fled to Geneva, but he cried out, Let their money perish with them that prefer all the world’s wealth before one day’s communion with Jesus Christ and his despised people.” (Trapp)

b. He who hates bribes will live: The one who hates bribes is set as a contrast to the one who is greedy for gain. The greedy man or woman will do anything for more money and loves bribes if they can bring more money. God’s blessing is on men and women of integrity who hate bribes and other dishonest ways of doing business.

Proverbs 15:28

The heart of the righteous studies how to answer,
But the mouth of the wicked pours forth evil.

a. The heart of the righteous studies how to answer: The idea behind the phrase “how to answer” is simply what one says in response. God’s righteous ones – men and women of wisdom – think beforehand what they should and will say. Their words are not based only on impulse and reaction.

b. The mouth of the wicked pours forth evil: There is little self-control when it comes to the mouth of the wicked. Evil words and ideas simply pour out of their mouth, with no wise thought beforehand.

i. “The advice is to say less but better things.” (Ross)

Proverbs 15:29

The Lord is far from the wicked,
But He hears the prayer of the righteous.

a. The Lord is far from the wicked: Men and women who are wicked do their best to separate themselves from God, and in this sense, God is far from them. There is another sense, especially in light of the work of Jesus, in which God draws near to the wicked to offer redemption and wisdom (Romans 5:8).

i. “But this farness or nearness respects not God’s essence, which is every where, but his gracious and helpful presence.” (Poole)

ii. “Proverbs does not envision the wicked as repenting; if they did, they would be righteous.” (Waltke)

b. He hears the prayer of the righteous: God draws near to those who draw near to Him (James 4:8). The prayer of the righteous man or woman is effective before God (James 5:16).

Proverbs 15:30

The light of the eyes rejoices the heart,
And a good report makes the bones healthy.

a. The light of the eyes rejoices the heart: The eyes are something like a lamp to the whole body (Matthew 6:22-23). When the eyes are full of light it brings happiness and contentment to the heart and the whole body.

i. “The light of the eyes may perhaps refer to the radiant face of a friend (cf. Proverbs 16:15); if so, the two lines of the proverb will be speaking of the heartwarming effect that persons and facts, respectively, can bring.” (Kidner)

b. A good report makes the bones healthy: Good news cheers the spirit and brings health to the body. The ultimate fulfillment of this is the gospel – the good news, the good report of what God did in Jesus Christ to demonstrate His love for us and to rescue us (1 Corinthians 15:1-8).

Proverbs 15:31

The ear that hears the rebukes of life
Will abide among the wise.

a. The ear that hears the rebukes of life: Not every ear will listen to correction, but there is a blessing to those that do. Also, life has its own rebukes for those who have the ear to hear. In general, life rewards wisdom and rebukes folly.

i. Hears the rebukes of life: “That receives it gratefully and obeys it. ‘Advice is for them that will take it,’ so says one of our own old proverbs; and the meaning here is nearly the same.” (Clarke)

ii. “The way we receive a rebuke tests our character. It reveals if we possess the graces of humility, sincerity, and self-knowledge.” (Bridges)

b. Will abide among the wise: One of the more important aspects of wisdom is the simple ability to hear and learn. If we can’t learn, we can never abide among the wise.

Proverbs 15:32

He who disdains instruction despises his own soul,
But he who heeds rebuke gets understanding.

a. He who disdains instruction despises his own soul: To refuse wisdom and the instruction that comes from wisdom is to hate one’s own soul. Those who reject wisdom hurt many people, but most of all themselves.

b. He who heeds rebuke gets understanding. To hear and heed rebuke is to get and grow in wisdom (understanding). Receiving rebuke is rarely pleasant, but it is worth it for the wisdom it brings.

i. Heeds rebuke: “Correction is infinitely preferable to the poison of sweet flattery.” (Bridges)

ii. Gets understanding: “Hebrew, possesseth an heart, which the Hebrews make the seat of wisdom.” (Poole)

Proverbs 15:33

The fear of the Lord is the instruction of wisdom,
And before honor is humility.

a. The fear of the Lord is the instruction of wisdom: A common and foundational theme in Proverbs is repeated here. Wisdom begins in the fear of the Lord, and true wisdom flows from it.

b. And before honor is humility: An essential aspect of the fear of the Lord is humility. To properly fear God is to see and recognize Him as He really is. When we see and recognize who we really are, humility comes.

i. Before honor is humility: “Luther observed that ever, for most part, before God set him upon any special service for the good of the church, he had some sore fit of sickness. Surely, as the lower the ebb, the higher the tide; so the lower any descend in humiliation, the higher they shall ascend in exaltation; the lower this foundation of humility is laid, the higher shall the roof of honour be overlaid.” (Trapp)

ii. “Humility; whereby men submit to God, and yield to men, which gains them love and respect; whereas pride procures them hatred and contempt from God and men.” (Poole)

iii. “Paradoxically, the one who grants himself no glory before the glorious God in the end is crowned with the glory and wealth that give him social esteem.” (Waltke)

(c) 2020 The Enduring Word Bible Commentary by David Guzik – ewm@enduringword.com

Sours: https://enduringword.com/bible-commentary/proverbs-15/
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Proverbs chapter 15

New International Version

1 A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.

2 The tongue of the wise adorns knowledge, but the mouth of the fool gushes folly.

3 The eyes of the LORD are everywhere, keeping watch on the wicked and the good.

4 The soothing tongue is a tree of life, but a perverse tongue crushes the spirit.

5 A fool spurns a parent's discipline, but whoever heeds correction shows prudence.

6 The house of the righteous contains great treasure, but the income of the wicked brings ruin.

7 The lips of the wise spread knowledge, but the hearts of fools are not upright.

8 The LORD detests the sacrifice of the wicked, but the prayer of the upright pleases him.

9 The LORD detests the way of the wicked, but he loves those who pursue righteousness.

10 Stern discipline awaits anyone who leaves the path; the one who hates correction will die.

11 Death and Destruction lie open before the LORD-- how much more do human hearts!

12 Mockers resent correction, so they avoid the wise.

13 A happy heart makes the face cheerful, but heartache crushes the spirit.

14 The discerning heart seeks knowledge, but the mouth of a fool feeds on folly.

15 All the days of the oppressed are wretched, but the cheerful heart has a continual feast.

16 Better a little with the fear of the LORD than great wealth with turmoil.

17 Better a small serving of vegetables with love than a fattened calf with hatred.

18 A hot-tempered person stirs up conflict, but the one who is patient calms a quarrel.

19 The way of the sluggard is blocked with thorns, but the path of the upright is a highway.

20 A wise son brings joy to his father, but a foolish man despises his mother.

21 Folly brings joy to one who has no sense, but whoever has understanding keeps a straight course.

22 Plans fail for lack of counsel, but with many advisers they succeed.

23 A person finds joy in giving an apt reply-- and how good is a timely word!

24 The path of life leads upward for the prudent to keep them from going down to the realm of the dead.

25 The LORD tears down the house of the proud, but he sets the widow's boundary stones in place.

26 The LORD detests the thoughts of the wicked, but gracious words are pure in his sight.

27 The greedy bring ruin to their households, but the one who hates bribes will live.

28 The heart of the righteous weighs its answers, but the mouth of the wicked gushes evil.

29 The LORD is far from the wicked, but he hears the prayer of the righteous.

30 Light in a messenger's eyes brings joy to the heart, and good news gives health to the bones.

31 Whoever heeds life-giving correction will be at home among the wise.

32 Those who disregard discipline despise themselves, but the one who heeds correction gains understanding. 33 Wisdom's instruction is to fear the LORD, and humility comes before honor.

English Standard Version

1 A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. 2 The tongue of the wise commends knowledge, but the mouths of fools pour out folly. 3 The eyes of the LORD are in every place, keeping watch on the evil and the good. 4 A gentle tongue is a tree of life, but perverseness in it breaks the spirit. 5 A fool despises his father’s instruction, but whoever heeds reproof is prudent. 6 In the house of the righteous there is much treasure, but trouble befalls the income of the wicked. 7 The lips of the wise spread knowledge; not so the hearts of fools. 8 The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the LORD, but the prayer of the upright is acceptable to him. 9 The way of the wicked is an abomination to the LORD, but he loves him who pursues righteousness. 10 There is severe discipline for him who forsakes the way; whoever hates reproof will die. 11 Sheol and Abaddon lie open before the LORD; how much more the hearts of the children of man! 12 A scoffer does not like to be reproved; he will not go to the wise. 13 A glad heart makes a cheerful face, but by sorrow of heart the spirit is crushed. 14 The heart of him who has understanding seeks knowledge, but the mouths of fools feed on folly. 15 All the days of the afflicted are evil, but the cheerful of heart has a continual feast. 16 Better is a little with the fear of the LORD than great treasure and trouble with it. 17 Better is a dinner of herbs where love is than a fattened ox and hatred with it. 18 A hot-tempered man stirs up strife, but he who is slow to anger quiets contention. 19 The way of a sluggard is like a hedge of thorns, but the path of the upright is a level highway. 20 A wise son makes a glad father, but a foolish man despises his mother. 21 Folly is a joy to him who lacks sense, but a man of understanding walks straight ahead. 22 Without counsel plans fail, but with many advisers they succeed. 23 To make an apt answer is a joy to a man, and a word in season, how good it is! 24 The path of life leads upward for the prudent, that he may turn away from Sheol beneath. 25 The LORD tears down the house of the proud but maintains the widow’s boundaries. 26 The thoughts of the wicked are an abomination to the LORD, but gracious words are pure. 27 Whoever is greedy for unjust gain troubles his own household, but he who hates bribes will live. 28 The heart of the righteous ponders how to answer, but the mouth of the wicked pours out evil things. 29 The LORD is far from the wicked, but he hears the prayer of the righteous. 30 The light of the eyes rejoices the heart, and good news refreshes the bones. 31 The ear that listens to life-giving reproof will dwell among the wise. 32 Whoever ignores instruction despises himself, but he who listens to reproof gains intelligence. 33 The fear of the LORD is instruction in wisdom, and humility comes before honor.

King James Version

1 A soft answer turneth away wrath: but grievous words stir up anger.

2 The tongue of the wise useth knowledge aright: but the mouth of fools poureth out foolishness.

3 The eyes of the LORD are in every place, beholding the evil and the good.

4 A wholesome tongue is a tree of life: but perverseness therein is a breach in the spirit.

5 A fool despiseth his father's instruction: but he that regardeth reproof is prudent.

6 In the house of the righteous is much treasure: but in the revenues of the wicked is trouble.

7 The lips of the wise disperse knowledge: but the heart of the foolish doeth not so.

8 The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the LORD: but the prayer of the upright is his delight.

9 The way of the wicked is an abomination unto the LORD: but he loveth him that followeth after righteousness.

10 Correction is grievous unto him that forsaketh the way: and he that hateth reproof shall die.

11 Hell and destruction are before the LORD: how much more then the hearts of the children of men?

12 A scorner loveth not one that reproveth him: neither will he go unto the wise.

13 A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance: but by sorrow of the heart the spirit is broken.

14 The heart of him that hath understanding seeketh knowledge: but the mouth of fools feedeth on foolishness.

15 All the days of the afflicted are evil: but he that is of a merry heart hath a continual feast.

16 Better is little with the fear of the LORD than great treasure and trouble therewith. 17 Better is a dinner of herbs where love is, than a stalled ox and hatred therewith.

18 A wrathful man stirreth up strife: but he that is slow to anger appeaseth strife.

19 The way of the slothful man is as an hedge of thorns: but the way of the righteous is made plain.

20 A wise son maketh a glad father: but a foolish man despiseth his mother.

21 Folly is joy to him that is destitute of wisdom: but a man of understanding walketh uprightly.

22 Without counsel purposes are disappointed: but in the multitude of counsellers they are established.

23 A man hath joy by the answer of his mouth: and a word spoken in due season, how good is it!

24 The way of life is above to the wise, that he may depart from hell beneath.

25 The LORD will destroy the house of the proud: but he will establish the border of the widow.

26 The thoughts of the wicked are an abomination to the LORD: but the words of the pure are pleasant words.

27 He that is greedy of gain troubleth his own house; but he that hateth gifts shall live.

28 The heart of the righteous studieth to answer: but the mouth of the wicked poureth out evil things.

29 The LORD is far from the wicked: but he heareth the prayer of the righteous.

30 The light of the eyes rejoiceth the heart: and a good report maketh the bones fat.

31 The ear that heareth the reproof of life abideth among the wise.

32 He that refuseth instruction despiseth his own soul: but he that heareth reproof getteth understanding.

33 The fear of the LORD is the instruction of wisdom; and before honour is humility.

New American Standard Bible

1 A gentle answer turns away wrath, But a harsh word stirs up anger. 2 The tongue of the wise makes knowledge pleasant, But the mouth of fools spouts foolishness. 3 The eyes of the LORD are in every place, Watching the evil and the good. 4 A soothing tongue is a tree of life, But perversion in it crushes the spirit. 5 A fool rejects his father’s discipline, But he who complies with rebuke is sensible. 6 Great wealth is in the house of the righteous, But trouble is in the income of the wicked. 7 The lips of the wise spread knowledge, But the hearts of fools are not so. 8 The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the LORD, But the prayer of the upright is His delight. 9 The way of the wicked is an abomination to the LORD, But He loves the one who pursues righteousness. 10 There is severe punishment for one who abandons the way; One who hates a rebuke will die. 11 Sheol and Abaddon lie open before the LORD, How much more the hearts of mankind! 12 A scoffer does not love one who rebukes him; He will not go to the wise. 13 A joyful heart makes a cheerful face, But when the heart is sad, the spirit is broken. 14 The mind of the intelligent seeks knowledge, But the mouth of fools feeds on foolishness. 15 All the days of the needy are bad, But a cheerful heart has a continual feast. 16 Better is a little with the fear of the LORD Than great treasure, and turmoil with the treasure. 17 Better is a portion of vegetables where there is love, Than a fattened ox served with hatred. 18 A hot-tempered person stirs up strife, But the slow to anger calms a dispute. 19 The way of the lazy one is like a hedge of thorns, But the path of the upright is a highway. 20 A wise son makes a father glad, But a foolish man despises his mother. 21 Foolishness is joy to one who lacks sense, But a person of understanding walks straight. 22 Without consultation, plans are frustrated, But with many counselors they succeed. 23 A person has joy in an apt answer, And how delightful is a timely word! 24 The path of life leads upward for the wise, So that he may keep away from Sheol below. 25 The LORD will tear down the house of the proud, But He will set the boundary of the widow. 26 Evil plans are an abomination to the LORD, But pleasant words are pure. 27 He who profits illicitly troubles his own house, But he who hates bribes will live. 28 The heart of the righteous ponders how to answer, But the mouth of the wicked pours out evil things. 29 The LORD is far from the wicked, But He hears the prayer of the righteous. 30 Bright eyes gladden the heart; Good news refreshes the bones. 31One whose ear listens to a life-giving rebuke Will stay among the wise. 32 One who neglects discipline rejects himself, But one who listens to a rebuke acquires understanding. 33 The fear of the LORD is the instruction for wisdom, And before honor comes humility.

New Living Translation

1 A gentle answer deflects anger, but harsh words make tempers flare.

2 The tongue of the wise makes knowledge appealing, but the mouth of a fool belches out foolishness.

3 The LORD is watching everywhere, keeping his eye on both the evil and the good.

4 Gentle words are a tree of life; a deceitful tongue crushes the spirit.

5 Only a fool despises a parent's discipline; whoever learns from correction is wise.

6 There is treasure in the house of the godly, but the earnings of the wicked bring trouble.

7 The lips of the wise give good advice; the heart of a fool has none to give.

8 The LORD detests the sacrifice of the wicked, but he delights in the prayers of the upright.

9 The LORD detests the way of the wicked, but he loves those who pursue godliness.

10 Whoever abandons the right path will be severely disciplined; whoever hates correction will die.

11 Even Death and Destruction hold no secrets from the LORD. How much more does he know the human heart!

12 Mockers hate to be corrected, so they stay away from the wise.

13 A glad heart makes a happy face; a broken heart crushes the spirit.

14 A wise person is hungry for knowledge, while the fool feeds on trash.

15 For the despondent, every day brings trouble; for the happy heart, life is a continual feast.

16 Better to have little, with fear for the LORD, than to have great treasure and inner turmoil.

17 A bowl of vegetables with someone you love is better than steak with someone you hate.

18 A hot-tempered person starts fights; a cool-tempered person stops them.

19 A lazy person's way is blocked with briers, but the path of the upright is an open highway.

20 Sensible children bring joy to their father; foolish children despise their mother.

21 Foolishness brings joy to those with no sense; a sensible person stays on the right path.

22 Plans go wrong for lack of advice; many advisers bring success.

23 Everyone enjoys a fitting reply; it is wonderful to say the right thing at the right time!

24 The path of life leads upward for the wise; they leave the grave behind.

25 The LORD tears down the house of the proud, but he protects the property of widows.

26 The LORD detests evil plans, but he delights in pure words.

27 Greed brings grief to the whole family, but those who hate bribes will live.

28 The heart of the godly thinks carefully before speaking; the mouth of the wicked overflows with evil words.

29 The LORD is far from the wicked, but he hears the prayers of the righteous.

30 A cheerful look brings joy to the heart; good news makes for good health.

31 If you listen to constructive criticism, you will be at home among the wise.

32 If you reject discipline, you only harm yourself; but if you listen to correction, you grow in understanding.

33 Fear of the LORD teaches wisdom; humility precedes honor.

Christian Standard Bible

1 A gentle answer turns away anger, but a harsh word stirs up wrath.

2 The tongue of the wise makes knowledge attractive, but the mouth of fools blurts out foolishness.

3 The eyes of the Lord are everywhere, observing the wicked and the good.

4 The tongue that heals is a tree of life, but a devious tongue breaks the spirit.

5 A fool despises his father's discipline, but a person who accepts correction is sensible.

6 The house of the righteous has great wealth, but trouble accompanies the income of the wicked.

7 The lips of the wise broadcast knowledge, but not so the heart of fools.

8 The sacrifice of the wicked is detestable to the Lord, but the prayer of the upright is his delight.

9 The Lord detests the way of the wicked, but he loves the one who pursues righteousness.

10 Discipline is harsh for the one who leaves the path; the one who hates correction will die.

11 Sheol and Abaddon lie open before the Lord -- how much more, human hearts.

12 A mocker doesn't love one who corrects him; he will not consult the wise.

13 A joyful heart makes a face cheerful, but a sad heart produces a broken spirit.

14 A discerning mind seeks knowledge, but the mouth of fools feeds on foolishness.

15 All the days of the oppressed are miserable, but a cheerful heart has a continual feast.

16 Better a little with the fear of the Lord than great treasure with turmoil.

17 Better a meal of vegetables where there is love than a fattened ox with hatred.

18 A hot-tempered person stirs up conflict, but one slow to anger calms strife.

19 A slacker's way is like a thorny hedge, but the path of the upright is a highway.

20 A wise son brings joy to his father, but a foolish man despises his mother.

21 Foolishness brings joy to one without sense, but a person with understanding walks a straight path.

22 Plans fail when there is no counsel, but with many advisers they succeed.

23 A person takes joy in giving an answer; and a timely word--how good that is!

24 For the prudent the path of life leads upward, so that he may avoid going down to Sheol.

25 The Lord tears apart the house of the proud, but he protects the widow's territory.

26 The Lord detests the plans of the one who is evil, but pleasant words are pure.

27 The one who profits dishonestly troubles his household, but the one who hates bribes will live.

28 The mind of the righteous person thinks before answering, but the mouth of the wicked blurts out evil things.

29 The Lord is far from the wicked, but he hears the prayer of the righteous.

30 Bright eyes cheer the heart; good news strengthens the bones.

31 One who listens to life-giving rebukes will be at home among the wise.

32 Anyone who ignores discipline despises himself, but whoever listens to correction acquires good sense. 33 The fear of the Lord is what wisdom teaches, and humility comes before honor.

Sours: https://www.bibleref.com/Proverbs/15/Proverbs-chapter-15.html

Proverbs 15
 
1 A gentle answer turns away wrath,
But a harsh word stirs up anger.
 
When somebody is trying to get a rise out of us, we fall right into their trap if we react with a quick temper, with violence, or with an angry outburst.  A harsh word in response to a person who likes to pick fights only stirs up anger by adding fuel to the fire.  We are better off giving a gentle answer to show that a person is better off picking a fight with somebody else who will make a better sparring partner.  Other times, we are best to just walk away or say nothing. 
 
The tongue of the wise makes knowledge acceptable,
But the mouth of fools spouts folly.
 
Part of wisdom is trying to convince and reason with others to show them what is good and right.  Sinful people are blinded toward the truth of Scripture, and there is a time to reason with them according to wisdom so that they can discern knowledge by the grace of God.  They need to see that what they are saying against God and His Word is plain folly and that it indicts them as being foolish.  The commandments of God are given to show the fool the exceeding sinfulness of his sin and the error of his ways (Romans 7:13).  Wisdom comes as people come to see the truth, fear God, and seek His forgiveness.
 
The eyes of the Lord are in every place,
Watching the evil and the good.
 
God sees all and will render to each according to his deeds at judgment time.  He will also support in this life those whose hearts are wholly His.  He will enable them to bear abundant fruit to His glory.  God keeps account of all the evil that evil people commit, and they will face His wrath one day.  The righteous will not face God’s wrathful judgment for their sin because Christ paid the penalty for it (1 Thessalonians 1:10, 2 Thessalonians 1:9-10).  Christians will be judged at the judgment seat of Christ on the basis of their faithfulness and stewardship (2 Corinthians 5:10, 1 Corinthians 3:10-15), while unbelievers will be cast into the lake of fire upon facing sentencing at the Great White Throne judgment (Revelation 20:11-15).  There is wrath to come for the unsaved.
 
A soothing tongue is a tree of life,
But perversion in it crushes the spirit.
 
Those who speak the truth encourage, equip, correct when necessary, and empower with words of life (Hebrews 3:13, 1 Thessalonians 5:11, Ephesians 4:29, Colossians 4:6).  Truth and the promises of God are like soothing ointment to a confused mind or wounded heart.  Those who speak lies and deceit, who are devoid of wisdom, or who just have nothing of value to say discourage those who could use a good word (Proverbs 12:25).
 
A fool rejects his father’s discipline,
But he who regards reproof is sensible.
 
Wisdom is proven by one’s ability to respond humbly and obediently to training in righteousness and to the truth of God’s Word.  Loving fathers who fear God will teach and train their children according to the commands and ways of God (Deuteronomy 6:7, 11:19).  A foolish child will spurn that teaching, but a wise young person heeds sound doctrine (Ephesians 6:1).
 
Great wealth is in the house of the righteous,
But trouble is in the income of the wicked.
 
The righteous will store up treasures in heaven and eternal rewards, but the wicked will suffer great loss and spend eternity in hell.  No amount of wealth can outweigh the trouble that evil brings, particularly in light of incurring God’s wrath.  Believers, even if they are poor in this life, have great eternal riches in Christ and every spiritual blessing (Psalm 16:11, Ephesians 1:3).
 
The lips of the wise spread knowledge,
But the hearts of fools are not so.
 
Wise people want others to understand wisdom because they recognize that its value is far beyond anything this world has to offer.  They want others to have the joy and hope that they have.  They want to teach others the ways of God and how to follow Him.  Fools could care less about following God and about wisdom.  Full of selfishness and delight in their sin, they could care less about the welfare of others.  Fools are unable to offer others the help of valuable knowledge and insight even if they wanted to because they do not know wisdom in Christ.
 
The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord,
But the prayer of the upright is His delight.
 
God delights in obedience more than sacrifice because to Him it is the heart that matters (1 Samuel 15:22).  Any person can perform some religious ritual to attempt to externally cleanse himself or to impress God, but God wants to clean up the inside of a person by regenerating his heart.  Thus, those who perform empty religious acts by maintaining a form of godliness while still denying the power of God (2 Timothy 3:5) to change their hearts make God very angry.  What people think is a checkmark in the column of goodness in their file of hoping to earn enough points to get into heaven is actually an abominable act before God.  Even the righteous sacrifices of a fallen heart are displeasing to God and like filthy rags before Him (Isaiah 64:6, Romans 3:23).  Only the cleansing of the blood of Christ can please a holy and perfect God.  He desires to give grace to the humble, but the proud who are confident in their self-generated and self-aggrandizing deeds must be brought low.  God delights in the prayer of those who are upright in heart because Christ intercedes for them and allows them to bring their requests before God (Hebrews 4:15-16).  God looks forward to hearing them cast their cares upon Him, for He cares for them (1 Peter 5:7, Philippians 4:6-7).  In their humility, they seek God’s help, while the arrogant choose not to depend on God for anything.  Even prayer from a wicked person is a repulsive thing to God.  If an entire country started going to church, praying, and doing some good deeds, it wouldn’t please God if their hearts did not belong to Him.  A true gospel is everything because only the gospel can change a people from the inside out and make their good works pleasing to God because they will be generated by the Spirit and not by some selfish, pride-filled motive.  Only the heart that has freely received of God’s freely given grace can freely give such grace and love to others (1 John 4:7-8).  Obedience to the gospel is what counts, not vain religion.
 
The way of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord,
But He loves one who pursues righteousness.
 
There are two distinctions throughout Proverbs and throughout the Bible.  On one side is the righteous, wise person who is loved and accepted by God on account of his faith in Christ.  On the other hand is the foolish, wicked person who continues to store up God’s wrath for himself.  One lives a life of abomination, and the other pursues righteousness by the grace of God which is at work in his heart.  There is no in between category of a person that is basically or mostly good, for these people still fall into the category of being abominable.  When man comes to see that he is so far short of God’s standards and grace and that his very life is an affront to God, then maybe he will be motivated to value the cross and respond in faith.  The proud must see the sinfulness of their sin so that they fall upon the grace of God (Romans 7:13). 
 
10 Grievous punishment is for him who forsakes the way;
He who hates reproof will die.
 
Those who hear the truth of the gospel and yet reject it will find an eternity in hell.  The only unforgiveable sin is to reject the call of the Holy Spirit by blaspheming Him with hard hearts that love sin and spurn the grace of God (Luke 12:10).  Those who do not respond in faith and humility to the revelation of God to man (God has revealed Himself through the conscience (Romans 1:32), through Scripture (2 Timothy 3:16-17), through Christ (Hebrews 1:1-2), and through the creation (Psalm 19:1-2, Romans 1:18-21)) will pay, for they have made a mockery of the sacrifice of Christ on the cross.  Those who are unwilling to respond to the truth when it hits them squarely in the face will suffer and pay the penalty.  On the other hand, those who seek the truth and practice it will find the Light in Christ (John 3:21). 
 
11  Sheol and Abaddon lie open before the Lord,
How much more the hearts of men!
 
God has the power to cast into hell, and thus the wicked need to learn to fear Him and turn from their sins (Luke 12:5).  He alone has the power over death, yet man thinks very little about life after death.  He sees the real state of all people’s hearts, for they lie open before Him.  It is foolishness to believe that God cannot see or that God is irrelevant or absent.  Nothing escapes His notice, and those who are sensitive to His Word will respond humbly and obediently to seek His forgiveness.  People must understand that Satan doesn’t rule over hell like some sort of crime boss, but he will be sentenced to suffer in it along with those whom he has deceived (Revelation 20:10).  It is God Who has the power to cast into hell, for hell is the way He will pour out His wrath on unbelievers. 
 
12 A scoffer does not love one who reproves him,
He will not go to the wise.
 
The fool scoffs at truth and hates to be confronted with correction.  He is not going to seek out wisdom from the Bible or from people who could share with him wisdom from the Bible.  He enjoys his folly and error and the company of other scoffers and mockers of truth. 
 
13 A joyful heart makes a cheerful face,
But when the heart is sad, the spirit is broken.
 
It is possible to force a smile even when the heart is sorrowful, but a joyful heart leads to a true, full, and genuinely happy and uplifted countenance (Genesis 4:7).  A sad heart breaks the spirit by sapping energy, hope, and passion.  There is a time to mourn with those who mourn and weep with those who weep so that they can be comforted and encouraged to press on.  It is not wrong to be sad as a Christian or to feel discouraged at times.  It is how we respond when we are in the valleys of life that counts.  We need to remember that Jesus traverses the valleys of death with us and comforts us with His presence (Psalm 23:4-6).  It is by His strength that we can endure, His mercies are new every morning, His faithfulness is great (Lamentations 3:22-25), He does exceedingly beyond all that we could ask or imagine (Ephesians 3:20), and He is an expert at turning sorrow into gladness and weeping into joy (Esther 9:22). 
 
14 The mind of the intelligent seeks knowledge,
But the mouth of fools feeds on folly.
 
A high intelligence doesn’t equate to having true knowledge, just as a fast processor on a computer doesn’t equate to having lots of data stored on the hard drive.  Real knowledge comes by those who study the world with Scripture as a foundation and faith as a magnifying glass.  Many very smart people end up saying very dumb things and creating foolish theories because they lack wisdom.  They hate God enough that they try to reason Him away, and they ignore the Bible enough that they come up with some ideas that are actually useless and even sometimes harmful.  Their foolish hearts cause them to want to feed on error, so they study other people’s error and further advance error.  Thinking they are wise, they have become fools (Romans 1:22), for they loved the wisdom of the world which is foolishness before God (1 Corinthians 1:20).  They preferred the approval of man rather than the approval of God.
 
15 All the days of the afflicted are bad,
But a cheerful heart has a continual feast.
 
Jesus said that we will have trouble in this world.  Some Christians spend much of their life in pain, in prison, or with some form of suffering.  Much that is bad characterizes their lives.  Yet, even so, their hearts can have a continual feast and celebration that this life is not all that there is, that they have been counted worthy to suffer shame for the sake of His name, and that hope fast approaches with heaven promised to them.  The believer has Jesus Himself in his heart in Whom there is fullness of joy and eternal pleasures and treasures.  What is earthly affliction compared to that?  In the heat of the battle and in the depth of affliction, that may be tough to remember, but we must recall it to mind so that we can endure and worship God until our final breath.
 
16  Better is a little with the fear of the Lord
Than great treasure and turmoil with it.
 
Great treasure is eternal treasure, and it is better to lack the resources of the world and to still have that treasure than to have all the resources of the world but have nothing after death.  Eternal treasure far outweighs and outranks the treasures of this world.  The stuff wicked people put their hope and confidence in will one day burn when God creates a new heaven and earth, but eternal treasure will exist forever.  Even on earth, one can find greater joy with fewer possessions but with the abundant life of Christ than with all that the world has to offer but without He Who alone satisfies the soul.
 
17  Better is a dish of vegetables where love is
Than a fattened ox served with hatred.
 
It is better to lack the luxuries of life and have loving friends and family than to sit at the table of rich fools who hate each other, you included, and the poor. 
 
18 A hot-tempered man stirs up strife,
But the slow to anger calms a dispute.
 
This verse corresponds to verse 1 by emphasizing that those who are quick to anger add fuel to the fiery rampage of violent men.  Those who don’t get worked up quickly and easily because they don’t like fighting and prefer to be peacemakers tend to calm disputes and help leveler heads prevail.  Christians are to do whatever they can to live peaceably with others, not to stir up strife (Romans 12:18).
 
19 The way of the lazy is as a hedge of thorns,
But the path of the upright is a highway.
 
Walking into a hedge of thorns hurts, but being able to journey down a cleared highway is much smoother.  A lazy person’s life is unproductive and held back by sin from bearing fruit for the kingdom.  Sadly, too many like this are content with thorns because they view a highway as too hard, too much work not worth their while, and not valuable enough.  The righteous are filled with the Spirit and operating by the strength and power of God to advance the church.  God has cleared a way for His gospel such that the gates of hell will not prevail against it (Matthew 16:18), and He opens doors for the effective furtherance of the gospel (1 Corinthians 16:9).  He will not be thwarted, and those who are wise travel His highway with the pedal to the metal (1 Corinthians 9:24).  (see also Proverbs 16:17)
 
20 A wise son makes a father glad,
But a foolish man despises his mother.
 
For parents that have any sense, having a child that grows up to love the Lord is a great joy, and there would be little to compare to the sorrow that would accompany seeing one’s child reject the gospel.
 
21 Folly is joy to him who lacks sense,
But a man of understanding walks straight.
 
Fools like their sin and doing dumb things.  They like to try to get others to approve and validate their spiritual idiocy.  Their passion and desire are for dysfunction, sinful pleasure, and destruction.  Those who have understanding hate sin, error, and the devastating effects of sin because they know it grieves God’s heart and saps their joy.  They long to see others fear God also and begin to take His Word seriously.  But fools enjoy the error of their ways, and it is very difficult to make a person who is happy being stupid see joy in being wise.
 
22 Without consultation, plans are frustrated,
But with many counselors they succeed.
 
The number of counselors is futile unless wisdom is present in their hearts.  As many who know and love God get together, pray together, and dissect His Word together, wise decisions can be made that benefit all and honor God.  When planning, it helps to have those who can offer wisdom and insight so that plans, choices, and actions can be most reflective of what God would want.  That defines true success (2 Timothy 4:6-8).
 
23 A man has joy in an apt answer,
And how delightful is a timely word!
 
Wisdom enables a person to give sound advice and encouragement when it is needed, and it is life and joy to those who are humble enough to receive it (Ephesians 4:29, Colossians 4:6, Proverbs 12:25).
 
24 The path of life leads upward for the wise
That he may keep away from Sheol below.
 
Those who are wise believe the gospel and seek to bear abundant fruit for the kingdom.  They keep persevering in righteousness and growing up to maturity in the truth.  The fear of God motivates them to love Him, and the love of God for them motivates them to rest in His embrace all the more (2 Corinthians 5:14).  God’s kindness leads them to keep repenting and growing (Romans 2:4), and they are thankful that God has saved them from the fire of hell.  The fear of God is the beginning point for wisdom, and it starts when fools fear the God Who has the authority to cast their souls into hell.  The gospel takes a life that is in a downward trajectory in regard to eternity, and it redirects its vector in an upward direction through faith in Christ.  Paul said that it was his goal to keep pressing on according to the upward call in Christ Jesus (Philippians 3:14).  We should want to keep growing in how we mirror His likeness and bring Him glory.
 
25 The Lord will tear down the house of the proud,
But He will establish the boundary of the widow.
 
Widows, like orphans, tend to get neglected and forgotten.  Women’s property rights like many of their rights were easily violated if they even existed at all. Proud, wicked people could and would try to take their possessions and even their land.  But God will one day make the proud, violent, and oppressive people pay, and a widow that fears God will be highly exalted in heaven even if considered low on the food chain on earth.
 
26 Evil plans are an abomination to the Lord,
But pleasant words are pure.
 
It is an offense against God to ponder wrong thoughts and start plotting evil deeds.  Rather, we should meditate and reflect upon the pleasant words of Scripture, for they will help us to purify our hearts and not be double-minded (James 4:8).  Christians are to think on what is good, noble, right, and pure, not on what will defile our minds and consciences (Philippians 4:8).  From a pure heart come good and edifying words that please God.    
 
27 He who profits illicitly troubles his own house,
But he who hates bribes will live.
 
Those who gain by illicit means will often suffer as a result.  Obviously, there are eternal consequences, but when committing crimes and cheating people out of money, one should not underestimate the wrath of other evil people.  Even family and loved ones can be harmed on account of taking shortcuts and stealing.  Taking a bribe means entering a world of deception, lying, and looking the other way when evil is committed.  If somebody thinks that the bond of secrecy is broken, it might cost a person his life.  Wickedness doesn’t pay, even if people get away with it in the short run.  It is not a peaceful way to live, but it is a life of fear, bondage, and looking over one’s shoulder. 
 
28 The heart of the righteous ponders how to answer,
But the mouth of the wicked pours out evil things.
 
Being a wise person doesn’t mean that we always have the answer right away.  It may mean that we need to slow down, meditate on God’s Word, and think through what God has to say on a matter.  A fool is quick to open his mouth and give dumb advice that will in all likelihood have some rather adverse consequences.  Sometimes we need to keep searching things out according to the Scripture until we know for sure what we must do.  God promises to give wisdom to His children who ask Him in faith without doubting.  God will never hold back wisdom from those who need it and ask Him for it (James 1:5-7).  He wants us to know what we should do, but sometimes we must be patient. 
 
29 The Lord is far from the wicked,
But He hears the prayer of the righteous.
 
Those who are not washed in the blood of Christ cannot approach the presence of God because of His holiness.  But those who have been redeemed can boldly approach the throne of grace to offer their requests in time of need (Hebrews 4:16).  God hears the prayers of His children because He sees them in the righteousness of Christ.  The wicked cannot ask anything of God until they ask for His forgiveness.  Until then, they are enemies with God and separated from Him on account of their sin.
 
30 Bright eyes gladden the heart;
Good news puts fat on the bones.
 
True joy is contagious, and people who are encouraged in the Lord are the best encouragers of others.  Being a Christian is not about the power of positive thinking and just trying to always put a rosy spin on life.  Joy is sourced in truth and the promises of God, and it is the gospel, the Scripture, and the testimony of believers as they have seen God deliver on His promises that provides the best encouragement (Psalm 32:11, 35:9, Philippians 4:4). 
 
31 He whose ear listens to the life-giving reproof
Will dwell among the wise.
 
Those who are humble enough to have ears to hear the wisdom from God will turn from their sins, love Jesus, and seek to grow in wisdom according to His Word (John 10:10). 
 
32 He who neglects discipline despises himself,
But he who listens to reproof acquires understanding.
 
Wise people respond to the teaching of Scripture and to the godly discipline of godly parents and teachers.  To refuse to humble oneself before God’s Word and His authority is not just to hate God but to hate oneself because sin always destroys.  The result of heeding sound teaching and reproof is growth, joy, wisdom, and understanding so that a person can be ready for every good work that God has for him to do (2 Timothy 3:16-17, Ephesians 2:10). 
 
33 The fear of the Lord is the instruction for wisdom,
And before honor comes humility.
 
The fear of the Lord motivates a person to get his soul right before God by receiving the gospel, and it encourages the believer to live a life pleasing to God so as not to be ashamed at Christ’s coming (1 John 2:28).  The Christian doesn’t have to fear the fire of hell, but he will suffer regret and sorrow if at the judgment seat of Christ he has little that endure the fiery test (1 Corinthians 3:10-15, 2 Corinthians 5:10).  God will honor those who honor Him (1 Samuel 2:30) with their lives by faith and because of their transformation through Jesus Christ.  Seeking to order one’s life in a way to honor God is evidence of a humble heart.  This stands in contrast to the wicked heart that hates correction, truth, and the commands of God.  In pride it stands in scoffing defiance against God, and destruction will be its end.

Sours: http://www.relevantbibleteaching.com/site/cpage.asp?cpage_id=140037349&sec_id=140001239

15 summary chapter proverbs

coupleeatingwatermelonHebrew-English Text
I. Summary
Proverbs 15 is a collection of thirty-three individual sayings. While there is no unifying theme to the chapter, certain verses focus on topics such as speech, accepting rebuke, prayer, and taking things into perspective.

II. Photo
Verse 17 speaks about the importance of love: “Better a meal of vegetables where there is love than a fattened ox where there is hate.”

III. Important Verses
v. 1: A gentle response allays wrath; A harsh word provokes anger.
v. 3: The eyes of the LORD are everywhere, Observing the bad and the good.
v. 8: The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the LORD, But the prayer of the upright pleases Him.
v. 15: All the days of a poor man are wretched, But contentment is a feast without end.
v. 16: Better a little with fear of the LORD Than great wealth with confusion.
v. 17: Better a meal of vegetables where there is love Than a fattened ox where there is hate.
v. 18: A hot-tempered man provokes a quarrel; A patient man calms strife.
v. 22: Plans are foiled for want of counsel, But they succeed through many advisers.
v. 23: A ready response is a joy to a man, And how good is a word rightly timed!
v. 25: The LORD will tear down the house of the proud, But He will establish the homestead of the widow.
v. 27: He who pursues ill-gotten gain makes trouble for his household; He who spurns gifts will live long.
v. 28: The heart of the righteous man rehearses his answer, But the mouth of the wicked blurts out evil things.

IV. Outline
1-2. Speech
3. Omniscience
4. Speech
5. Accepting rebuke
6. Reward of the righteous/wicked
7. The wise/foolish
8. Prayer
9. Righteousness/wickedness
10. Accepting rebuke
11. Omniscience
12. Accepting rebuke
13. Emotions
14. The wise/foolish
15. Wealth and happiness
16. Fear of the Lord
17. Love
18. A hot temper
19. Laziness
20. The two sons
21. The wise/foolish
22. Counsel
23. A witty remark
24. The wise
25. Divine anger/sympathy
26. Evil thoughts
27. Greed
28. Speech: deliberation
29. Prayer
30. Good news
31-32. Accepting discipline
33. Fear of the Lord; Humility

V. Comment
Proverbs 15 is a collection of thirty-three sayings. While the chapter continues to use antithetical parallelism (like the previous five), that type of parallelism begins to dwindle. For example, antithetical parallelism is absent in vv. 3, 10-11, 12, 23-24, 30-31, and 33. In terms of the chapter’s structure, there are certain catchwords that unite juxtaposed verses: body organs in vv. 2-4, tov “good” in vv. 2-3, “abomination to the Lord” in vv. 8-9 (and 26), and shema’ “hear” in vv. 29-32. Also, the word lev “heart” plays a prominent role, appearing in vv. 7, 11, 13 (2x), 14, 15, 21, 28, 30, and 32.

Verbal communication is a recurring topic in the chapter, appearing in vv. 1, 2, 4, 7, 23, 26, and 28. V. 1 says, “A gentle response allays wrath; A harsh word provokes anger.” The notion that unfriendly responses only cause more problems is prevalent in the book of Proverbs. For example, two verses speak about how one can appease the harsh rulings of a king: 25:15 says, “Through forbearance a ruler may be won over; A gentle tongue can break bones,” and 16:14 says “The king’s wrath is a messenger of death, But a wise man can appease it.”

Another verse that deals with verbal communication is v. 23: “A ready response is a joy to a man, And how good is a word rightly timed!” Murphy points out that “one of the ideals of the sage was to have the right word at the right time, as this verse indicates.” For example, see 10:11: “The mouth of the righteous is a fountain of life, But lawlessness covers the mouth of the wicked.” Our chapter also points out that one should deliberate before speaking: “The heart of the righteous man rehearses his answer, But the mouth of the wicked blurts out evil things” (v. 28). Also see v. 18: “A hot-tempered man provokes a quarrel; A patient man calms strife.”

Chapter 15 begins a new trend in the book’s “core” (ch. 10-29): it has sayings which use God’s proper name. One of them is v. 3, “The eyes of the LORD are everywhere, Observing the bad and the good.” The theme of omniscience is taken up again in v. 11: “Sheol and Abaddon lie exposed to the LORD, How much more the minds of men!” Prov. 24:12 turns this message into a warning, “If you say, ‘We knew nothing of it,’ Surely He who fathoms hearts will discern the truth, He who watches over your life will know it, And He will pay each man as he deserves.” In regards to the “eyes” of God, see a similar usage in Prov. 22:12 and 24:18.

Another verse that incorporates God’s name is v. 8: “The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the LORD, But the prayer of the upright pleases Him.” This messsage, that the sacrificer/suppliant is more important than the sacrifice/prayer, is also seen in v. 29: “The LORD is far from the wicked, But He hears the prayer of the righteous.” It is a common theme in the prophets, e.g. Isa. 1:11-17: “‘What need have I of all your sacrifices?’ Says the LORD. ‘I am sated with burnt offerings of rams, And suet of fatlings, And blood of bulls; And I have no delight In lambs and he-goats. And when you lift up your hands, I will turn My eyes away from you; Though you pray at length, I will not listen. Your hands are stained with crime… Wash yourselves clean; Put your evil doings Away from My sight. Cease to do evil; Learn to do good. Devote yourselves to justice; Aid the wronged. Uphold the rights of the orphan; Defend the cause of the widow.”

V. 15 is an example of the book’s no-nonsense approach to poverty: “All the days of a poor man are wretched, But contentment is a feast without end.” The book of Proverbs is honest: the rich have it much better than the poor. For example, 22:7 says, “The rich rule the poor, And the borrower is a slave to the lender,” 10:15 says, “The wealth of a rich man is his fortress; The poverty of the poor is his ruin,” and 14:20 says, “A pauper is despised even by his peers, But a rich man has many friends.” But, as shall be seen, our chapter also says that things should be taken into perspective.

Vv. 16-17 incorporate the “better… than…” formula: “Better a little with fear of the LORD Than great wealth with confusion. Better a meal of vegetables where there is love Than a fattened ox where there is hate.” Murphy writes, “The “better” saying is a common literary form in wisdom literature… [it] is made [in] order to express a paradox, to overturn what would normally be considered a plus, e.g., riches, into a minus.” Other examples are 16:8, 16, 19; 17:1; 28:6. It is also interesting that vv. 16-17 show a strong affinity to The Instruction of Amenemope (ca. 1200 BCE, see Context of Scripture 1.47 section 9 lines 5-8): “Better is poverty in the hand of the god, Than wealth in the storehouse; Better is bread with a happy heart Than wealth with vexation.” The Instruction of Amenemope’s relation to the book of Proverbs will be further dealt with in ch. 22.

Vv. 16-17 seem to put affluence into a broader perspective. While many verses promise wealth to the righteous, no proverb says it all. For example, our v. 6 says, “In the house of the righteous there is much treasure, But in the harvest of the wicked there is trouble.” However, v. 16 makes a caveat: not all righteous people will be wealthy, “Better a little with fear of the LORD Than great wealth with confusion.” Indeed, wisdom passages such as Eccl. 5:9-11 express an adverse view of wealth: “A lover of money never has his fill of money, nor a lover of wealth his fill of income. That too is futile. As his substance increases, so do those who consume it; what, then, does the success of its owner amount to but feasting his eyes? A worker’s sleep is sweet, whether he has much or little to eat; but the rich man’s abundance doesn’t let him sleep.” For a verse similar to v. 17 see 17:1, “Better a dry crust with peace Than a house full of feasting with strife.”

V. 22 speaks about seeking advice, “Plans are foiled for want of counsel, But they succeed through many advisers.” Also see 13:10, “Arrogance yields nothing but strife; Wisdom belongs to those who seek advice.” Yet, again Murphy points out that no proverb says it all: even plans can go wrong. For example, see 14:12, “A road may seem right to a man, But in the end it is a road to death.” Also see 19:21.

V. 25 speaks about divine punishment and mercy: “The LORD will tear down the house of the proud, But He will establish the homestead (gevul) of the widow.” The word gevul seems to refer to property (cf. 23:10). Murphy writes, “the widow was particularly vulnerable in Israelite society, since she had none but herself to mount a defense against encroachments and oppression, as the prophets frequently indicate, e.g., Isa 1:23; Jer 7:6.” Also see Deut. 24:20-21 which allots produce to the widow, “When you beat down the fruit of your olive trees, do not go over them again; that shall go to the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow. When you gather the grapes of your vineyard, do not pick it over again; that shall go to the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow.”

V.  27 says, “He who pursues ill-gotten gain (botzea’ betza’) makes trouble for his household; He who spurns gifts (mattanot) will live long.” The antithetical parallelism indicates that the word mattanot “gifts” has a negative connotation, i.e. they are a bribe. Waltke points out that the word mattanah, which usually means “gift,” is synomous with shochad “bribe” in wisdom literature. For example, 18:16 speaks about gaining favor with a ruler by means of “gifts”: “A man’s gift (mattan) eases his way And gives him access to the great.” Similarly, 21:14 says, “A gift (mattan) in secret subdues anger, A bribe (shachad) in private, fierce rage.” Note how mattan is parallel to shachad in this last verse. Waltke also notes that the term botzea’ betza’,  which was used in the first half of the verse, is also used to describe the murderous thieves of ch. 1 (cf. 1:19).

VII. Works Used

(See Commentaries page)

Murphy, Proverbs (Word Biblical Commentary)

Waltke, The Book of Proverbs I (New International Commentary on the Old Testament)

Photo taken from http://www.llu.edu/llu/sph/news/news-healthypeople2007.html

Published

Sours: https://929chapters.com/2009/04/28/proverbs-15-%E2%80%9Cvarious-sayings-proper-speech-accepting-rebuke%E2%80%9D/
PROVERBS CHAPTER 15 SUMMARY

The way to avoid stirring up strife, is to be (v18) instead of becoming angry quickly or easily. Saying things that grieve people cause them to become more and more angry (v1), but responding gently can calm them down even when they're starting to get mad.

The way we speak is so important. Saying the right thing at the right time causes joy and is so good (v23). If we're pure, we'll use pleasant words (v26b). Wholesome words bring life (v4).

Happiness effects health (v13,30), and our attitudes can determine whether our situations are positive (v15), instead of visa-versa.

We should use restraint in our speech instead of speaking too much (v2), and study in our hearts before we reply to something (v28). If we're wise, our speech will give out knowledge (v7).

Instead of being proud (v25) we should be humble (v33b) and listen. We should seek for knowledge (v14) and have advice from many different people (v22). We should listen to our parents (v5,20) and to reproof (v10,12,31,32.)

Like we should listen to our parents and receive correction, we should be humble and fear of the Lord (v16,33). Here's a reason to fear Him: The Lord sees everything (v3), even people's hearts (v11). He responds well to righteous people (v9b), and hears their prayers (v8b,29b), but it's hard for wicked people to approach Him (v29a). He detests wicked people's ways (v9a), their thoughts (v26a), and even their sacrifices (v8a).

Righteous people have a plain (v19), upright (v21), and higher (v24) pathway.

Righteousness is where the real value is. Treasure comes from righteousness (v6), but even great treasure isn't of great value, when it comes with trouble instead of with the fear of the Lord (v16). Real value comes from having the fear of the Lord, even with just a small amount of stuff. Love is so much better than hatred, that it would be better to have love and just vegetables to eat, than it would be to have hatred, even with a whole ox (v17), and oxen were especially valuable back then. Greed can end up backfiring, but life comes to people that are so opposite of greedy that they even hesitate to accept gifts (v27). (And I think that word, there is talking about bribes.)

Sours: https://www.findmercy.com/2009/10/proverbs-15-summary.html

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Proverbs 15 Bible Commentary

Complete     Concise

Commentary on Proverbs 15:1

(Read Proverbs 15:1)

A right cause will be better pleaded with meekness than with passion. Nothing stirs up anger like grievous words.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:2

(Read Proverbs 15:2)

He that has knowledge, is to use it aright, for the good of others.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:3

(Read Proverbs 15:3)

Secret sins, services, and sorrows, are under God's eye. This speaks comfort to saints, and terror to sinners.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:4

(Read Proverbs 15:4)

A good tongue is healing to wounded consciences, by comforting them; to sin-sick souls, by convincing them; and it reconciles parties at variance.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:5

(Read Proverbs 15:5)

If instruction is despised, reprove men rather than suffer them to go on undisturbed in the way to ruin.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:6

(Read Proverbs 15:6)

The wealth of worldly men increases their fears and suspicions, adds strength to their passions, and renders the fear of death more distressing.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:7

(Read Proverbs 15:7)

We use knowledge aright when we disperse it; but the heart of the foolish has nothing to disperse that is good.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:8,9

(Read Proverbs 15:8,9)

The wicked put other things in the stead of Christ's atonement, or in the place of holy obedience. Praying graces are his gift, and the work of his Spirit, with which he is well pleased.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:10

(Read Proverbs 15:10)

He that hates reproof shall perish in his sins, since he would not be parted from them.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:11

(Read Proverbs 15:11)

There is nothing that can be hid from the eyes of God, not even man's thoughts.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:12

(Read Proverbs 15:12)

A scorner cannot bear to reflect seriously within his own heart.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:13

(Read Proverbs 15:13)

A gloomy, impatient, unthankful spirit, springing from pride and undue attachment to worldly objects, renders a man uneasy to himself and others.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:14

(Read Proverbs 15:14)

A wise man seeks to gain more wisdom, growing in grace and in the knowledge of Christ. But a carnal mind rests contented, flattering itself.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:15

(Read Proverbs 15:15)

Some are much in affliction, and of a sorrowful spirit. Such are to be pitied, prayed for, and comforted. And others serve God with gladness of heart, and it prompts their obedience, yet they should rejoice with trembling.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:16,17

(Read Proverbs 15:16,17)

Believers often have enough when worldly eyes see little; the Lord is with them, without the cares, troubles, and temptations which are with the wealth of the wicked.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:18

(Read Proverbs 15:18)

He that is slow to anger, not only prevents strife, but appeases it, if kindled.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:19

(Read Proverbs 15:19)

Those who have no heart to their work, pretend that they cannot do their work without hardship and danger. And thus many live always in doubt about their state, because always in neglect of some duty.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:20

(Read Proverbs 15:20)

Those who treat an aged mother or a father with contempt or neglect, show their own folly.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:21

(Read Proverbs 15:21)

Such as are truly wise, study that their thoughts, words, and actions should be regular, sincere, and holy.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:22

(Read Proverbs 15:22)

If men will not take time and pains to deliberate, they are not likely to bring any thing to pass.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:23

(Read Proverbs 15:23)

Wisdom is needed to suit our discourse to the occasions.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:24

(Read Proverbs 15:24)

A good man sets his affections on things above; his way leads directly thither.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:25

(Read Proverbs 15:25)

Pride is the ruin of multitudes. But those who are in affliction God will support.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:26

(Read Proverbs 15:26)

The thoughts of wicked men offend Him who knows the heart.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:27

(Read Proverbs 15:27)

The covetous man lets none of his family have rest or enjoyment. And greediness of gain often tempts to projects that bring ruin.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:28

(Read Proverbs 15:28)

A good man is proved to be a wise man by this; he governs his tongue well.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:29

(Read Proverbs 15:29)

God sets himself at a distance from those who set him at defiance.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:30

(Read Proverbs 15:30)

How delightful to the humbled soul to hear the good report of salvation by the Lord Jesus Christ!

Commentary on Proverbs 15:31

(Read Proverbs 15:31)

Faithful, friendly reproofs help spiritual life, and lead to eternal life.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:32

(Read Proverbs 15:32)

Sinners undervalue their own souls; therefore they prefer the body before the soul, and wrong the soul to please the body.

Commentary on Proverbs 15:33

(Read Proverbs 15:33)

The fear of the Lord will dispose us to search the Scriptures with reverence; and it will cause us to follow the leadings of the Holy Spirit. While we humbly place all our dependence on the grace of God, we are exalted in the righteousness of Christ.

  1. Bible > Bible Commentary
  2. Matthew Henry’s Bible Commentary (concise)
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  4. Proverbs 15
Sours: https://www.christianity.com/bible/commentary/mhc/proverbs/15


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