Fox body headlight bulb

Fox body headlight bulb DEFAULT

  • Pathetic headlights ~ Good for a laugh
  • 10-01-2009, 09:40 AM#1


  • 10-01-2009, 10:06 AM#2

    Precipus is offline
    FEP Member Precipus's Avatar

    Default

    there is a discussion going on currently about a relay mod that sends maximum voltage and amperage to the lights. Here is a quick link i found for you. http://www.rowand.net/shop/tech/Wiri...ightRelays.htm
    just adding brighter lights isn't going to do much as it's the voltage/amperage getting to the lights that provides the Lumens your looking for.


  • 10-01-2009, 10:25 AM#3

    Default

    QuoteOriginally Posted by PrecipusView Post

    there is a discussion going on currently about a relay mod that sends maximum voltage and amperage to the lights. Here is a quick link i found for you. http://www.rowand.net/shop/tech/Wiri...ightRelays.htm
    just adding brighter lights isn't going to do much as it's the voltage/amperage getting to the lights that provides the Lumens your looking for.

    If your wiring is up to par, it should be sufficient. Brighter bulbs should help. Just get the newest, brightest, whitest bulbs you can buy at Wal-Mart. You will probably be surprised how much they've improved. Don't get anything that will draw higher amperage, because that can cause problems. And if your wiring is the problem, just fix it. I am not a fan of wiring in extra relays to put a Band-Aid on the real problem. Try new bulbs, make sure they are kept clean, clean the terminals in the connectors, use a bit of die-electric grease if you get excited, and see what happens. If they are still dim, start checking the circuit for voltage drops.

    This relay repair to me is like throwing a floor speaker in your hatch because one of your speakers is blown. Sure, the floor speaker will probably sound good, but why not just replace the speaker and fix the real problem?

    I use the Sylvania "Performance" line Halogen sealed beam headlights (purchased at Wal-Mart). My wiring is good. People flash me when my LOWS are on! When I hit the high beams, I have to squint!

    1985 Mercury Capri GS - 5.0, 5-Speed, Ported E7s, FMS F303, TFS Valve Springs, Summit Stage 2 Intake, Holley Street Avenger 570, BBK Longtubes, BBK O/R H-Pipe, Flowmasters, Dumps, FRPP HD Clutch, Pro 5.0, Rear Upper and Lower Control Arms, and tons of satisfaction when I can say, "I just beat you with a Mercury!"

    1983 Mercury Capri RS Crimson Cat - 5.0, 4-Speed, T-roof.


  • 10-01-2009, 10:26 AM#4


  • 10-01-2009, 10:41 AM#5


  • 10-01-2009, 10:47 AM#6

    Default

    I used the wiring relay idea because I went to H4/H1 setup. My high beams get all kinds of flashing. Maybe its the 100W H1 lights...

    Installing the relay cause the light warning center to show my lights being bad. Not sure how to fix this so for the most part I just ignore it as I have done for ever!

  • 10-01-2009, 10:53 AM#7


  • 10-01-2009, 11:10 AM#8

    Default

    No.

    If you're making your own harness, put the wires where they belong in the connectors. If you're buying a pre-made harness that is for Halogen lamps but you're using it for H1/H4 bulbs, the wires can be swapped in the connectors.

  • 10-01-2009, 11:17 AM#9

    854vragtop is offline
    FEP Senior Member 854vragtop's Avatar

    Default

    QuoteOriginally Posted by bigjason_5View Post

    And if your wiring is the problem, just fix it. I am not a fan of wiring in extra relays to put a Band-Aid on the real problem.

    This relay repair to me is like throwing a floor speaker in your hatch because one of your speakers is blown. Sure, the floor speaker will probably sound good, but why not just replace the speaker and fix the real problem?

    QuoteOriginally Posted by FoxChassisView Post

    The "real" problem IS the factory wiring.

    The relay "repair" is how all newer cars headlamps are wired. Relays make the wiring (voltage drop) and switch (failing switches) problems with higher output headlights a non-issue.

    The factory fog lamps on an '85 GT are wired with a relay. Why not the headlights? Harness and relay systems can be homemade or bought where you don't have to cut the factory wiring. Just tap into the factory headlight sockets.

    '85 Mustang convertible GT, 5 speed, 4V
    Stock bottom end, Comp Cams XE264HR-14, GT-40P heads w/ Alex's springs, Weiand 8124 Street Warrior
    8.8 Turbo Coupe rear end w/ 3.55 gears, '94/'95 Cobra brakes, '85 Town Car M/C, '93 Cobra booster, MM Panhard bar.

    '68 Mercury Cougar, w/ '88 5.0L, 4V
    My photo website:
    http://www.twilightphoto.com/


  • 10-01-2009, 11:29 AM#10


  • 10-01-2009, 12:10 PM#11

    U S Marine is offline
    FEP Member

    Default

    QuoteOriginally Posted by bigjason_5View Post

    This relay repair to me is like throwing a floor speaker in your hatch because one of your speakers is blown. Sure, the floor speaker will probably sound good, but why not just replace the speaker and fix the real problem?

    It was said once already. The wiring is a problem. Also, you really need to research what the relay does. It's not a band-aid. It allows the headlight, or other circuits depending on which you want to wire, to receive the full voltage that they are entitled to. They also alleviate unneccesay draw from the alternator not to mention it prevents your headlight switch from overheating and melting. I would be willing to bet that the only reason the fox body does not have relayed headlights is to keep build cost down. Try one, you'll like it.

    Tony

    1984 SVO 1C
    1988 5.0 Coupe 9L
    1990 2.3 Turbo Coupe 9L
    1996 Mark VIII
    2009 Fusion SEL V6


  • 10-01-2009, 04:38 PM#12


  • 10-01-2009, 05:20 PM#13

    Default

    QuoteOriginally Posted by U S MarineView Post

    It was said once already. The wiring is a problem. Also, you really need to research what the relay does. It's not a band-aid. It allows the headlight, or other circuits depending on which you want to wire, to receive the full voltage that they are entitled to. They also alleviate unneccesay draw from the alternator not to mention it prevents your headlight switch from overheating and melting. I would be willing to bet that the only reason the fox body does not have relayed headlights is to keep build cost down. Try one, you'll like it.

    Repairing problems with factory wires is just as effective. You can all agree or disagree as much as you want, but when you have a voltage drop in a circuit, you can find it with a DVOM, and repair it. If your drop is in a wire, replace that wire. If your drop is in a connector, repair or replace the terminals. If it is in the switch, replace the switch. The only thing this "relay" repair is doing is using "new" wires to power the headlights. It is not creating any more power. It is simply making a new circuit. What it does, is use the factory headlight wiring as the activation circuit, since low amperage will still energize and activate a relay (a voltage drop will not have much affect). Then it is using an overlay circuit to provide the power to the headlights. But why make a new circuit when you can repair the old one? What happens if the wires to the Duraspark go bad? I'm sure you can use a relay and overlay harness to power that too. How about the brake lights? Same thing? And your wipers, and ignition coil, and power door locks... Where do you draw the line? If you attack every repair this way, I don't even want to think of the rats nest of wires that would be running everywhere! So why even perform one repair that way? You create all that mess when you could have just fixed the car! Overlay relays and harnesses are a Band-Aid, and nothing more in my book. I stand by my statement.

    1985 Mercury Capri GS - 5.0, 5-Speed, Ported E7s, FMS F303, TFS Valve Springs, Summit Stage 2 Intake, Holley Street Avenger 570, BBK Longtubes, BBK O/R H-Pipe, Flowmasters, Dumps, FRPP HD Clutch, Pro 5.0, Rear Upper and Lower Control Arms, and tons of satisfaction when I can say, "I just beat you with a Mercury!"

    1983 Mercury Capri RS Crimson Cat - 5.0, 4-Speed, T-roof.


  • 10-01-2009, 06:06 PM#14


  • 10-01-2009, 07:54 PM#15

    Default

    QuoteOriginally Posted by bigjason_5View Post

    Overlay relays and harnesses are a Band-Aid, and nothing more in my book. I stand by my statement.

    I wonder why this is a Band-aid. I mean you are drawing less current with the relays. I am sure everyone has seen the famous alternator pig tail burned or the fan switch connector burned as well. Ford isnt real good at making the most of their wiring. When it comes to it lets just say they use the bare minimum as most manufacturers. My 88 Toy had 2 relays for the head lights. One for each side that controlled the hi and lo beams. When I upgraded my lights to 65/90 the relays worked perfectly. Hell the Saturn I took my relays from has 30 ampers for the lights.....

    If you want to get down to the brass tax here look at your ignition switch. How many of those are burned? Yeah Ford has bad wiring.....

  • 10-01-2009, 08:37 PM#16

    86gtwith82nose is offline
    FEP Senior Member

    Default

    i still say h.i.ds there all plug and play nowadays...


  • 10-01-2009, 08:41 PM#17


  • 10-01-2009, 08:45 PM#18

    86gtwith82nose is offline
    FEP Senior Member

    Default

    they are put in the same housing as the stock headlight so if you install them right the angle might be right... and its not the fact that they are brighter.. its the color itself... i can get 4300k(what color the stock headlights come in) and make it a little brighter and not blind anyone.. or i could get 10000k (blue) that is a special color and seems brighter.... and blind people....


  • 10-01-2009, 09:41 PM#19

    Default

    QuoteOriginally Posted by bigjason_5View Post

    Repairing problems with factory wires is just as effective. You can all agree or disagree as much as you want, but when you have a voltage drop in a circuit, you can find it with a DVOM, and repair it. If your drop is in a wire, replace that wire. If your drop is in a connector, repair or replace the terminals. If it is in the switch, replace the switch. The only thing this "relay" repair is doing is using "new" wires to power the headlights. It is not creating any more power. It is simply making a new circuit. What it does, is use the factory headlight wiring as the activation circuit, since low amperage will still energize and activate a relay (a voltage drop will not have much affect). Then it is using an overlay circuit to provide the power to the headlights. But why make a new circuit when you can repair the old one? What happens if the wires to the Duraspark go bad? I'm sure you can use a relay and overlay harness to power that too. How about the brake lights? Same thing? And your wipers, and ignition coil, and power door locks... Where do you draw the line? If you attack every repair this way, I don't even want to think of the rats nest of wires that would be running everywhere! So why even perform one repair that way? You create all that mess when you could have just fixed the car! Overlay relays and harnesses are a Band-Aid, and nothing more in my book. I stand by my statement.


    Interesting that you mention using a voltmeter. I went with relays on my 1986 GT. I did that in 1989. I got my '86 GT in 1987 and the high beams would cause the circuit breaker to trip sometimes. Checking with a voltmeter showed only 9V at the headlight connector. In 1989. Even new, the wiring sucked. It would drop even more if other electrical demands such as the A/C were running.

    The problem is the undersized wiring and trying to run 220W worth of current ( @ 12V = ~18 amps) from the alternator/battery to the steering column mounted switch, then back up front, then through the ground path. The ground wires are undersized as well.

    If you like, check this site with a calculator for wire size and load. The stock Ford wiring is 16 AWG. Electrical engineers rate 16 AWG wire for 22 amps maximum so the wiring does not melt. With a 12VDC source, 16 AWG wiring, and 20' circuit, the calculator shows 9V at the load which is pretty much what I measured using the voltmeter on an essentially brand new car.

    Relay is not a band-aid. It is a revision/upgrade to a marginal design. Ford was building to a budget.

  • 10-01-2009, 09:52 PM#20

    Default

    I found this on Daniel Stern Lighting.

    Most interesting is the voltage/lumens table below.

    Note a 50% drop in lumens at 10.5 volts!

    WHY USE RELAYS?

    Power for the headlights is controlled by a switch on the dash. The headlamp switch uses tiny, high-resistance contacts to complete circuits, and the wire lengths required to run from the battery to the dashboard and all the way out to the headlamps creates excessive resistive voltage drop, especially with the thin wires used in most factory installations.

    In many cases, the thin factory wires are inadequate even for the stock headlamp equipment. Headlamp bulb light output is severely compromised with decreased voltage. The drop in light output is not linear, it is exponential with the power 3.4.For example, let's consider a 9006 low beam bulb rated 1000 lumens at 12.8 Volts and plug in different voltages:

    10.5V : 510 lumens
    11.0V : 597 lumens
    11.5V : 695 lumens
    12.0V : 803 lumens
    12.5V : 923 lumens
    12.8V : 1000 lumens ←Rated output voltage
    13.0V : 1054 lumens
    13.5V : 1198 lumens
    14.0V : 1356 lumens ←Rated life voltage
    14.5V : 1528 lumens

    Last edited by PaceFever79; 10-01-2009 at 10:10 PM.


  • 10-01-2009, 10:03 PM#21


  • 10-02-2009, 12:13 AM#22

    Default

    QuoteOriginally Posted by Mike CrokeView Post

    Interesting that you mention using a voltmeter. I went with relays on my 1986 GT. I did that in 1989. I got my '86 GT in 1987 and the high beams would cause the circuit breaker to trip sometimes. Checking with a voltmeter showed only 9V at the headlight connector. In 1989. Even new, the wiring sucked. It would drop even more if other electrical demands such as the A/C were running.

    The problem is the undersized wiring and trying to run 220W worth of current ( @ 12V = ~18 amps) from the alternator/battery to the steering column mounted switch, then back up front, then through the ground path. The ground wires are undersized as well.

    If you like, check this site with a calculator for wire size and load. The stock Ford wiring is 16 AWG. Electrical engineers rate 16 AWG wire for 22 amps maximum so the wiring does not melt. With a 12VDC source, 16 AWG wiring, and 20' circuit, the calculator shows 9V at the load which is pretty much what I measured using the voltmeter on an essentially brand new car.

    Relay is not a band-aid. It is a revision/upgrade to a marginal design. Ford was building to a budget.

    Factory bulbs were 35 watts. That draws about 2.7 amps at 12.8 volts, which a 16 AWG wire is more than capable of handling. You can't knock the wiring being too small if you are trying to run 55 watt bulbs in a system never designed for them. That's like getting upset that you can't plug a 220 volt compressor into a socket wired for 110! The wiring was sufficient... for what it was designed for. If you are installing something that wasn't in the plans, you can't blame Ford.

    And the wiring on the alternators burning up wasn't from the wires being too small, it was from poor terminal connections, which is easily repairable and does not require rewiring the entire car.

    The ignition switches were a cheap and poor design, yes. But that is a replacable switch, and is separate from the wiring. Yes, it has started the wiring on fire on some cars, but that was the fault of the failed switch, not the wires.

    If you are dead set on modifying the lighting system, fine. But I'd rather work with what the car was designed for, personally, and make repairs in line with Ford's design, when needed.

    1985 Mercury Capri GS - 5.0, 5-Speed, Ported E7s, FMS F303, TFS Valve Springs, Summit Stage 2 Intake, Holley Street Avenger 570, BBK Longtubes, BBK O/R H-Pipe, Flowmasters, Dumps, FRPP HD Clutch, Pro 5.0, Rear Upper and Lower Control Arms, and tons of satisfaction when I can say, "I just beat you with a Mercury!"

    1983 Mercury Capri RS Crimson Cat - 5.0, 4-Speed, T-roof.


  • 10-02-2009, 01:17 AM#23

    Default

    QuoteOriginally Posted by bigjason_5View Post

    Factory bulbs were 35 watts. That draws about 2.7 amps at 12.8 volts, which a 16 AWG wire is more than capable of handling. You can't knock the wiring being too small if you are trying to run 55 watt bulbs in a system never designed for them. That's like getting upset that you can't plug a 220 volt compressor into a socket wired for 110! The wiring was sufficient... for what it was designed for. If you are installing something that wasn't in the plans, you can't blame Ford.

    And the wiring on the alternators burning up wasn't from the wires being too small, it was from poor terminal connections, which is easily repairable and does not require rewiring the entire car.

    The ignition switches were a cheap and poor design, yes. But that is a replacable switch, and is separate from the wiring. Yes, it has started the wiring on fire on some cars, but that was the fault of the failed switch, not the wires.

    If you are dead set on modifying the lighting system, fine. But I'd rather work with what the car was designed for, personally, and make repairs in line with Ford's design, when needed.

    The factory headlights on my 1986 GT overloaded the factory circuit breaker in 1989. Never mind high wattage lamps available in later years. The factory orginal parts had 9V at the lamp 1989. Not severely deteriorated wiring after decades of neglect.

    Even using the 35W lamps, that's still 12 amps and a 20' circuit which results in a 2V drop or 10V at the lamp. Using larger wire and eliminating the Ford multifunction switch from the main power conducting circuit will greatly increase the light output.

    Consider the idea that Ford (and any other automaker) did not always design well. That's why there are so many technical service bulletins and recalls. I agree that often hot rodders and home mechanics think they know better than the factory that built the car and over-fix a "problem". However, wiring that gives 10V at the headlights under ideal design conditions is marginal.

    Consider also that the engineers may have wanted something better but were limited by budget or supplier. So they compromised.

  • 10-02-2009, 02:19 AM#24

    Default

    Yes, factory wire is of the right gauge for stock lamps (35/40w but was also merely capable of handling 45/50w as used in Europe) ... but look how long it is ... it starts from the starter-relay, runs along the firewall, goes to the headlight switch (which is not of the most effective design) then back to the engine bay following the fender approns ... that's quite a loooong trip for current so the loss is there, even when new. Add to that the age of your wires and their 16ga is no longer revelent.

    You can somewhat cure the problem by renewing all the wiring and installing a new, factory quality (not cheap copy), headlight switch, but you'll still have the voltage drop due to wiring length and face the same headlight flickering one day or another, usually at the worst moment.

    Maybe you never had that opportunity to drive one, but look at the lighting of Volvo or Saabs in the 90s ... never asked you why they had better lighting than contemporary US cars ? It's not the headlight nor the bulbs as they were changed for US market .... it's relays ... just that.

    Relays is not overkill ... it cures the not so effective conception of the factory wiring and gives you a better lighting for your and others security at a cheap price. Plus it can be done so it's invisible for those who don't like to see anything that's not factory.

    What's overkill. and dangerous for anyone, is installing HID bulbs in non-HID housings. No matter how well you aim them, no matter which color you choose, they'll generate glare to incoming driver ... that's a different light source that needs its own light treatment.


  • 10-02-2009, 02:24 AM#25


  • Sours: http://vb.foureyedpride.com/
    $4.99 6 pan head screws.

    Don't forget to pick up a set of matching Mustang Fog Light Bulbs to go with your new headlight bulbs! Buy Ford Mustang 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 Euro Headlights Black Headlight Assemblies FREE DELIVERY possible on eligible purchases.

    Use the information below to determine what bulbs you need to replace your Mustang's headlights.

    Fox Body Mustang. 1 Mustang 00 Headlight Bulb Also known as HB1. Upgrade Your Mustang Headlight For Less With Parts from CJ Pony Parts. These bulbs are. Our Headlight Bulb Retainers are engineered for affordability and convenience. I bought these. 1 Most Popular Sizes Auto Push Pin Rivets Set Door Trim Panel Clips for GM Ford Toyota Honda Chrysler. 00 01 Mustangs with Factory HID Headlights D S High Intensity Discharge HID Headlight Bulb. 00 01 Mustangs have optional HID headlights. Much better sockets. Dorman 111 Headlight Bulb Retainer for Select Ford Mercury Models Radiator Drain Cock Reproduction Offset Grip Ford. 1 1 1 Euro Headlights Black Headlight Assemblies FREE DELIVERY possible on eligible purchases. Shop our complete line of headlight bulbs below. They are much better quality Convertible Top Motor And Pump Re Build Kit Ford.

    Mustang headlight choices and availability you can use the Internet for on line auto parts store. 0 out of stars 1. 00 01 Mustang Ford Mustang Headlight Bulb Screw Set 00 Series H1 Headlight Bulb The standard bulb for 00 01 Mustangs is an H1 halogen bulb that has both low and high beam function.

    Good replacement sockets.

    0 out of stars.

    1 00 Mustang or Cobra Headlight Mounting Hardware Retainer Tab Clips Set of.

    Save time money and labor replace only the Headlight Bulb Retainer for Select Ford Mercury Models. Some 00 01 Mustangs have optional HID headlights.

    The ones that came with the after market headlights I bought melted.

    Members: 551

    Sours: https://win.lanvil.xyz/ford-mustang-headlight-bulb-screw-set.php
    1. Two broke girls clothing
    2. Kern county ordinance
    3. Go karts craigslist
    4. Pink and turquoise bathroom
    5. Hotspot shield create account

    100% fit guarantee 125kHz RFID Card Key Door Access copier Machine ID Copy Reader Writer in USB Kit brand on sale clearance

    for decades, the priorities for value chains were reliability and efficiency – a dependable supply at the lowest cost. yet now, all businesses must do more than simply deliver the product that customers want, when they want it. today’s agriculture businesses must also deliver on: a sustainable value chain through visibility and traceability.

    why traceability?

    traceability is the capacity to verify the history, location or status of an item. by knowing how the smallest raw materials enter and move across value chains, estates and mills are able to increase agility and effectively identify inputs and outputs to improve sustainability processes in detail.

    technologies, such as ai, iot, and software platforms take traceability to the next level by tracking process status and produce movements. detailed reporting captures direct links from one touchpoint to the next.

    planning vs. implementation

    while businesses make plans concerning the process flow that should occur in its value chain, visibility measures how much managers know what’s actually taking place within its supply chain. this ranges from real-time insights and analysis to predictive problem solving. this know-how allows players to scale-up efforts to reduce, reuse, recycle and remanufacture.

    regardless of which industry, product, or operational size, traceability drives a smarter, safer, more efficient interconnected value chain. this is the key to a more sustainable world.

    interested to discover more about the capabilities of how traceability and visibility can benefit your agriculture practices?

    let’s have a chat on digital tools that create circular supply chains.

    data at every major and minor touchpoint of the chain

    Sours: https://www.friedmanlaw.com/gail00/ac1512880.htm

    Okay, this write-up is going to describe, in as much detail as possible, how to properly equip an 87-93 mustang with HID headlights. The same general process can be used to do it on any other car as well.

    First, before I begin the write-up, let me give a little lesson on HID lighting.

    This website give a lot of very good information about halogen vs. HID lighting:
    http://www.intellexual.net/hid.html

    To paraphrase some key points from the site above:
    High Intensity Discharge systems consist of a bulb and a ballast/ignitor. The ballast acts as an ignition box to fire up the gas discharge process. The bulb itself is filled with a mixture of noble gases as well as alkali earth metal salts. In this setup, the noble gases and metal salts are actually used as part of the lighting processes. The ballast takes in a small amount of input power of 35 watts at 12 volts and inducts a solid-state charge of 25,000 volts to the positive electrode. This creates a very high-powered arc of electricity across the electrodes, which excites xenon gas into discharging photon particles (light).

    The problem:
    Most people think that they can put HIDs in their car by purchasing one of these plug and play kits. This can be done, and it will give better light output than stock halogen bulbs. However, it is the totally WRONG approach. HID bulbs produce a very bring light, that is obvious. The key thing is focusing this light properly and safely. The light emitted from an HID bulb and a halogen bulb is not the same. HIDs have different optics compared to halogen. It requires a special type of reflector housing or a projector.

    The biggest problem with just throwing an HID “kit” is the glare caused to oncoming drivers. Halogen housings are not made for HID bulbs. The light gets scattered in all kinds of directions instead of being focused towards the ground like it should be. This creates a nightmare for oncoming drivers and it can be very dangerous.

    The solution:
    Equip a halogen housing with HID projectors. This is a VERY custom job and takes a lot of time and patience. There are a lot of different projectors out there to choose from. Some are small, some are large. Some have HID high beams, some do not. The Fox housing is rather large so size was not an issue for me. That is why I chose to use a set of BMW E46 bi-xenon projectors. The bi-xenon means that I have both low AND high beam capabilities.


    Okay, time to get down to business. First I'll describe the retro itself, then the wiring and aiming and all that.

    These are the housings that the projectors are going into:


    Here is a picture of the projector itself


    Because of the type of projector I chose, I had to do a little extra modification to get it to work properly. I needed to create a shroud around the open area between the lens and the bulb. I only want the light to shine through the lens, not anywhere else. In other words, I need to create a “sealed” beam.

    So my solution was to create a shroud out of fiberglass. This was my first time ever working with fiberglass, so if it’s not perfect, that is my excuse, hah.

    I used aluminum foil and strips of thin aluminum to lay the fiberglass on:


    Then I layered the glass:




    trimmed it:


    put some filler on


    smoothed it out



    and the final product.


    Here are some pics of it on the projector. The shiny piece on the front is a bezel from a 5 series BMW that I trimmed




    Once I got that out of the way, I started work on the housing itself. I drew out marks of the smallest and largest parts of the projector. So the cutting I do will be somewhere within those lines.


    This is basically what is going to happen. The back of the housing is going to be cut out and the projector will be inserted and then fiberglassed into place.


    The last time I did the retrofit on my car, I needed to bake the housings in the oven for 10 minutes at 250* to melt the glue so I could separate the lens from the housing. The way that I am doing it this time will not require that, thankfully.

    To cut out the back of the housing I used a drill to make some holes around the perimeter of the circle. Then I simply used a jig saw to cut the hole. The back of these housing were surprisingly thick.



    Then I had to enlarge the hole some more. Yes, it's quite large.



    Here's the projector halfway mounted into the hole. I still need to cut out some more to get it to slide in a little further.


    And a little teaser of how the final product should look.



    Here's the passenger side which is ready to be mocked up in the car and aimed.



    Now for the wiring/electrical part. This is one of the most important parts of the install. A typical HID bulb operates at 35 watts and pulls about 3 amps of current, compared to a halogen's 55 watts. Not only do they take less power to run, but they burn cooler and create less heat than a halogen bulb. However, there is one issue. When you flip the headlight switch to turn on your headlights, all those gases in the bulb must be ignited. This occurs during the first 5 seconds after the lights are turned on.

    Here's what an HID bulb looks like, for those of you that don't know. You can see a small round bubble in the middle of the bulb. That is where the salts are that get ignited. There are 24,000 volts running through those bulbs when they are on.


    Here is the ballast/ignitor that powers the bulb. The red connector attaches to the end of the bulb. The other side of the ballast is where it gets it's 12v source and ground from the car.



    You may notice that when a BMW or Audi turns their lights on, they come on very blue and then slowly turn whiter and whiter. This is what the bulb does when it warms up. During this warm up period, the ballast/ignitors draw close to 15 amps of current for each bulb, which is much more than the stock wiring can take. After a little while the wiring isn't going to take that abuse anymore and will probably burn up. To fix this problem, an additional wiring harness consisting of relays is required. The relays take the grunt of the high current so the stock wiring doesn't have to. There are tutorials online that show how to make one, or you could just buy one already made for around $50. www.suvlights.com sells pre-made plug and play wiring harnesses. And besides, an upgraded headlight harness should be on of the first things upgraded on our fox bodies. They didn't exactly come with great wiring from the factory.

    To mount the projectors to the housing, I used epoxy, JB Weld , as well as some Quik Steel. There is no way that the projectors will ever be able to break loose from the housing. They are in there for good.

    To aim the headlights, I used my Subaru Impreza as a baseline. I aimed the headlights against the shed on the side of my house. I then took a number of different measurements such as the height of the beam from the ground, the distance between the driver and passenger beams, the height of the projector from the ground, the distance from the shed, and the angle that the beam is projected. I then used those numbers to aim the projectors on the mustang. I used masking tape to mark where I wanted the center of the beam to be. I took into consideration the difference in ride heights and widths of the cars. I did one headlight housing at a time. Mounted the headlight housing to the car but did not put on the nuts that bolt it down. I held the projector assembly with the back of my hand and aimed it accordingly. I then had to carefully pull the headlight out of the car while still holding it. That was the hardest part, because if I moved my hand, the projector would move and I would have to do it all over again. Once I got it out, I had a friend put some Quik Steel around the edges. I held it until it dried and then I filled in all the rest with JB Weld and 5 minute epoxy. I then repeated everything all over again for the other side.

    Here are some pics of the final product. I still have to make some more adjustment to get the lights to line up nicely.








    at night


    Some output pics.



    low beam

    high beam

    side shot


    These give you a good idea of how much light output there really is.


     


    The comments system is currently being upgraded so comments are not available at the moment. I hope to have them operational soon.

    Sours: http://www.mikefordmustang.com/writeups/hidfox/87-93-mustang-hid-retrofit.php

    Bulb headlight fox body

    1989 Ford Mustang - Headlight Bulb

    Your headlight bulb ensures clear vision in poor weather conditions or at night. Like all light bulbs, headlight bulbs will eventually burn out. When one headlight goes out, it's likely the other bulb will also burn out soon. If you have a headlight that has started to dim or has burned out, it should be replaced as soon as possible for your safety. When you need a headlight bulb, visit O’Reilly Auto Parts. There are many different headlight bulb options in terms of brightness, color, and down-road visibility, so you can find a bulb for your repair. We also carry tail light and brake light bulbs and other exterior lighting products for your car, truck, or SUV.

    Show More Show Less
    1 - 9 of 9 results for Headlight Bulb
    Sours: https://www.oreillyauto.com/shop/b/lighting---electrical-16777/headlight-bulb-11519/f5abcf842030/1989/ford/mustang
    1991 MUSTANG GT 5.0 \

    I was so aroused that it seemed like grease was coming out of my ass. He fucked me for a long time, taking me by the lower back, and his balls loudly slapped against my ass. At the same time, I did not get much pleasure, but the process itself turned me on, besides, the feeling of lipstick. On my lips and high-heeled shoes complemented my imagination, I very naturally imagined myself as a woman.

    Finally, twitching a couple of times, he finished.

    You will also like:

    He removed his right hand from the steering wheel, gently hugged his wife, and pulled up to him. - Romka, watch the road, the car is already on the sidelines. We will fly off the track now. She screamed in fear. - Don't panic, I have everything under control, you see, I'm slowing down.



    1859 1860 1861 1862 1863