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New Alienware Aurora Ryzen™ Edition Gaming Desktop

ALIENWARE AURORA RYZEN™ EDITION R10 GAMING DESKTOP

★★★★★★★★★★4.4(2572)4.4 out of 5 stars. 4.439 reviews

Estimated Value

$1,149.98

Dell Price$1,139.99

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AMD Ryzen™ 5 5600X

Windows 11 Home

NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 1660 SUPER™ 6GB GDDR6

8GB, 1x8GB, DDR4, 3200MHz, XMP

1TB 7200RPM SATA 6Gb/s

First month subscription Premium Support included. Includes an AMD Ryzen™ processor, designed for gamers who create.

Financing

No interest if paid in full within 12 mos on $499+^

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Up to $34 back in rewards

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New Alienware Aurora Ryzen™ Edition Gaming Desktop

ALIENWARE AURORA RYZEN™ EDITION R10 GAMING DESKTOP

★★★★★★★★★★4.4(2572)4.4 out of 5 stars. 4.439 reviews

Estimated Value

$1,649.98

Dell Price$1,639.99

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AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800

Windows 11 Home

NVIDIA® GeForce RTX™ 3060 12GB GDDR6

16GB, 2x8GB, DDR4, 3200MHz, XMP

1TB 7200RPM SATA 6Gb/s

First month subscription Premium Support included. Designed for powerful, intelligent and efficient gaming performance with an AMD Ryzen™ 7 processor.

Financing

No interest if paid in full within 12 mos on $499+^

Interest will be charged to your account from the transaction posting date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 12 mos.

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Up to $49 back in rewards

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New Alienware Aurora Ryzen™ Edition Gaming Desktop

ALIENWARE AURORA RYZEN™ EDITION R10 GAMING DESKTOP

★★★★★★★★★★4.4(2572)4.4 out of 5 stars. 4.439 reviews

Estimated Value

$1,649.98

Dell Price$1,639.99

You Save $9.99

Free Delivery

AMD Ryzen™ 5 5600X

Windows 11 Home

AMD Radeon™ RX 6700XT 12GB GDDR6

8GB, 1x8GB, DDR4, 3200MHz, XMP

256GB M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD

First month subscription Premium Support included. Featuring the new AMD Ryzen™ 5 5600X processor with "Zen 3" Architecture for high-speed gaming performance.

Financing

No interest if paid in full within 12 mos on $499+^

Interest will be charged to your account from the transaction posting date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 12 mos.

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Up to $49 back in rewards

Order Code wdr10_cec_10s

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New Alienware Aurora Ryzen™ Edition Gaming Desktop

ALIENWARE AURORA RYZEN™ EDITION R10 GAMING DESKTOP

★★★★★★★★★★4.4(2572)4.4 out of 5 stars. 4.439 reviews

Estimated Value

$2,379.98

Dell Price$2,369.99

You Save $9.99

Free Delivery

AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800

Windows 11 Home

AMD® Radeon™ RX 6800 XT 16GB GDDR6

16GB, 2x8GB, DDR4, 3200MHz, XMP

1TB M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD (Boot) + 1TB 7200RPM SATA 6Gb/s (Storage)

First month subscription Premium Support included. Experience elite gaming performance with the new 8-core AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800 processor.

Financing

No interest if paid in full within 12 mos on $499+^

Interest will be charged to your account from the transaction posting date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 12 mos.

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Up to $71 back in rewards

Order Code wdr10_cec_20s

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New Alienware Aurora Ryzen™ Edition Gaming Desktop

ALIENWARE AURORA RYZEN™ EDITION R10 GAMING DESKTOP

★★★★★★★★★★4.4(2572)4.4 out of 5 stars. 4.439 reviews

Estimated Value

$2,829.98

Dell Price$2,819.99

You Save $9.99

Free Delivery

AMD Ryzen™ 9 5900

Windows 11 Home

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 10GB GDDR6X LHR

16GB, 2x8GB, DDR4, 3200MHz, XMP

1TB M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD (Boot) + 1TB 7200RPM SATA 6Gb/s (Storage)

First month subscription Premium Support included. Featuring an AMD Ryzen™ 9 5900 processor with "Zen 3" Architecture, ideal for livestreaming gamers who play and record simultaneously.

Financing

No interest if paid in full within 12 mos on $499+^

Interest will be charged to your account from the transaction posting date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 12 mos.

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Up to $84 back in rewards

Order Code wdr10_cec_30s

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New Alienware Aurora Ryzen™ Edition Gaming Desktop

ALIENWARE AURORA RYZEN™ EDITION R10 GAMING DESKTOP

★★★★★★★★★★4.4(2572)4.4 out of 5 stars. 4.439 reviews

Estimated Value

$4,379.98

Dell Price$4,369.99

You Save $9.99

Free Delivery

AMD Ryzen™ 9 5950X

Windows 11 Home

NVIDIA® GeForce RTX™ 3090 24GB GDDR6X

32GB, 2x16GB, DDR4, 3200MHz, XMP

1TB M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD (Boot) + 1TB 7200RPM SATA 6Gb/s (Storage)

First month subscription Premium Support included. Featuring the new AMD "Zen 3" Architecture designed to deliver incredible energy efficiency and lower latency.

Sours: https://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/gaming-and-games/sr/game-desktops/all-amd-processors?appliedRefinements=11738

The best CPU for gaming in 2021

The best CPU for gaming is actually a component you can buy today. After an extended period where you couldn't buy the processor you might want, it's generally possible to get your pick of the bunch. There have even been actual deals on some of the top CPUs too. Shocking, I know.

Every chip on this list has been tested through our intense CPU benchmarking suite on our PC Gamer test rig. This includes 3D and video rendering workloads as well and, most importantly, gaming performance.  

Right now, our favorite CPU is the Ryzen 9 5900X, along with much of AMD's current impressive Zen 3 chips, which give you the best performance and pricing combined. The release of Intel's Rocket Lake chips means we've got a bunch of CPUs of varying quality, with its flagship Core i9 11900K being a bit of an expensive letdown whereas the less powerful Core i5 11600K is the best value we've seen for Intel CPUs. But we've got another new generation of Intel chips on the way, with Alder Lake potentially capable of shaking off AMD's grip on the high end of the best CPU list.

Make sure you check ourbest gaming motherboard list if you are planning to do a brand new build.

The best CPU for gaming

1. AMD Ryzen 9 5900X

The best CPU for gaming right now

Specifications

Cores: 12

Threads: 24

Base Clock: 3.7 GHz

Boost Clock: 4.8 GHz

Overclocking: Yes

L3 Cache: 64 MB

TDP: 105 W

PCIe 4.0 lanes: 20

Reasons to buy

+The best CPU for gaming+Awesome performance throughout+Fast and efficient architecture

Reasons to avoid

-Needs a proper 3rd-party cooler

AMD's Zen architecture has improved with each generation, but the fact that AMD managed to knock out a 19 percent IPC improvement with Zen 3 is nothing short of staggering. The key takeaway for us as gamers is that this improvement means that AMD can now stand toe to toe with Intel when it comes to gaming. Honestly, there's so little between these two now that anyone claiming otherwise is delusional. 

Whatever resolution you are gaming at, this processor can handle it and keep your graphics card of choice fed with many juicy frames. The fact that this is a 12-core, 24-thread monster means that it can cope with anything else you throw at it as well. So if you have dreams of 3D rendering, video editing, or any other serious tasks, you'll know that you have the raw grunt to handle it. The fact that it won't hold you back when gaming makes it even sweeter. 

The only real downside is the pricing and the dropping of the Wraith cooler—don't forget to factor in when you buy. You do get what you pay for, though, and this is a phenomenal chip for gaming and anything else you might want to do. 

If you're in the market for absolute power, you could step up to the Ryzen 9 5950X, which gives you 16 cores and 32 threads. However, it costs $250 more, and for gaming purposes and even most content creation chores, the 5900X is more than sufficient.

Read our full AMD Ryzen 9 5900X review.

2. Intel Core i5 11600K

Intel's best gaming CPU is a great value proposition

Specifications

Cores: 6

Threads: 12

Base clock: 3.9 GHz

Turbo clock: 4.9 GHz (single core)

Overclocking: Yes, 4.9 GHz typical all-core

L3 cache: 12 MB

TDP: 125 W

PCIe 4.0 lanes: 20

Reasons to buy

+Undercuts 5600X on price+High-end gaming performance+Solid multithreading chops

Reasons to avoid

-iGPU is still quite weak

The Core i5 11600K is my favorite chip of the new Rocket Lake generation, which marks a nostalgic return to the old days of Intel CPU launches. The top processor was always a decent halo product, but the i5 was where the price/performance metrics really sold a new generation. Okay, with the 11900K being a frustrating chip, maybe it's not a total return to the old days, but the 11600K is still an outstanding six-core, 12-thread gaming processor.

It's also incredibly affordable too, with a price tag well underneath the Ryzen 5 5600X and performance figures that have it trading blows with AMD's otherwise excellent Zen 3 chip. The Cypress Cove 14nm backport may have made it relatively power-hungry, but that doesn't stop it from being a great gaming CPU and one that delivers a lot of processor silicon for not a lot of cash.

And PCIe 4.0 support on Intel 500-series motherboards. Though that is of dubious benefit at the moment as our testing has not so far gone well with supported PCIe 4.0 SSDs. That will hopefully change, but even so, this is still one of the best cheap gaming CPUs around.

Read our full Intel Core i5 11600K review.

3. AMD Ryzen 5 5600X

AMD's top affordable, and available, Zen 3 CPU today

Specifications

Cores: 6

Threads: 12

Base Clock: 3.7 GHz

Boost Clock: 4.6 GHz

Overclocking: Yes

L3 Cache: 32 MB

TDP: 65 W

PCIe 4.0 lanes: 20

Reasons to buy

+Awesome gaming performance+Great value for money+Decent overclocking potential+Wraith Stealth included

Reasons to avoid

-$50 more than 3600X-... 3600X came with a better cooler

When it comes to gaming, everything that's great about the 5900X rings true for this more affordable Zen 3 chip as well. There's nothing between any of the Ryzen 5000 chips in games, which means you'll hit the same frame rates with this chip as you will our number one pick. Which is incredible when you think about it—top-tier performance from the most affordable Zen 3 CPU? We'll say yes to that every single day.

This does have half the core count of that top chip, rolling in as it does with six cores and 12 threads. However, this is only an issue with those more serious workloads, which is more than sufficient for more reasonable stuff. You could argue that gaming could go beyond the 12-threads we have here, but there's no evidence that is the case so far, and that's even though the next-gen consoles are rocking 8-cores and 16-threads. 

The Ryzen 5 5600X also bucks the Ryzen 5000 family's trend by shipping with a Wraith Stealth cooler, so you don't have to drop extra money on a third-party chiller. You don't need to, but if you do, you'll hit higher clocks for longer and also open up the wonderful world of overclocking, which could make it worthwhile. This is a decent little overclocker, and while it won't affect gaming much, it'll help in other areas nicely.

Read our full AMD Ryzen 5 5600X review.

4. Intel Core i5 10400F

A great budget-friendly option for Intel builds

Specifications

Cores: 6

Threads: 12

Base Clock: 2.9 GHz

Turbo Clock: 4.3 GHz

Overclocking: No

L3 Cache: 12 MB

TDP: 65 W

PCIe 3.0 lanes: 16

Reasons to buy

+Affordable mid-range performance+Cooler included in box

Reasons to avoid

-Doesn't support overclocking

The Core i5 10400F is a surprisingly exciting option. It's slightly faster than the previous-gen Core i5 9400, but that F-suffix means it ditches the Intel integrated graphics completely. That's not a problem for gamers unless you want to use QuickSync, although Nvidia's NVENC is arguably better anyway. Overall, it's an excellent budget-friendly choice that doesn't cost much more than a Core i3 part.

There are other compromises, like the locked multiplier—no overclocking here. But you can save money and grab an H470 motherboard. At least you get a cooler in the box, something we'd like to see as an option with every CPU. Most boards will happily run the 10400F at 3.9GHz, so don't worry about the low base clock.

While the i5 10400F may not be as fast as other CPUs in multithreaded tests, in our gaming suite, it's tied with AMD's last-gen 3900X. Future games may start to push beyond its 6-core capabilities, but probably not before you're ready for an upgrade. Right now, the i5 10400F is plenty fast and extremely affordable.

5. AMD Ryzen 7 5800X

A great mid-range chip for serious work and gaming

Specifications

Cores: 8

Threads: 16

Base Clock: 3.8 GHz

Boost Clock: 4.7 GHz

Overclocking: Yes

L3 Cache: 32 MB

TDP: 105 W

PCIe 4.0 lanes: 20

Reasons to buy

+The same great Zen 3 architecture+Awesome gaming performance+PCIe 4.0 support

Reasons to avoid

-Can fall behind Intel in gaming at this price

If the Intel Core i7 doesn't exist in a world, this would be an incredible chip and would have made it into our top three recommendations, no sweat. It's excellent for gaming, producing the exact figures that can be seen for the 5900X and 5600X. Still, it also appears to hit the sweet spot in configuration terms, with its eight cores and 16 threads surely seeing it right for the future, seeing as that is what the Xbox Series X and Playstation 5 are rocking. 

Unfortunately for AMD, Intel does exist, and the blue company's Core i7 10700K matches this in plenty of the more critical metrics but has this chip beat in one significant way—value for money. This is faster in serious tasks, and if that's what you've got an eye on, then buy this and don't give it a second thought. But if you're mainly looking at gaming, Intel does pretty much the same but costs less. And that's hard for AMD to get away from. 

Competition aside, this is still Zen 3 strutting its stuff, and it does that impressively well. Throw in the support for PCIe 4.0 as well, and this is a forward-looking chip that will last you for years. 

Read the full AMD Ryzen 5 5800X review.

6. Intel Core i9 10900K

The Comet Lake flagship is still a powerful option

Specifications

Cores: 10

Threads: 20

Base Clock: 3.7 GHz

Turbo Clock: 5.3 GHz

Overclocking: Yes, 5.0-5.3 GHz typical

L3 Cache: 20 MB

TDP: 95 W

PCIe 3.0 lanes: 16

Reasons to buy

+High performance gaming+Overclocking potential

Reasons to avoid

-Older Comet Lake architecture

Intel's top Comet Lake gaming chip, the Core i9 10900K, lost a lot of what made it special with the release of Zen 3. When the 10900K was unveiled, it came with the reassurance that it was the world's fastest gaming processor, but that's not a claim it can hold on to anymore, with plenty of games handing wins to AMD's Ryzen 5900X. It's still a cracking gaming chip, don't get us wrong, but it traded on being the very best, and once that went, it lost a lot of its shine.

What hasn't overshadowed it is Intel's latest release. The Rocket Lake i9 11900K is almost as powerful overall, but it's more expensive and still misses out on the multi-threaded side.

The 10900K is still overkilled for most cases, apart from possibly at the very high-end and for serious workloads; AMD chips make more sense, but there's still a bizarre charm to this CPU. You probably don't need it, but if you build a machine around it, you know it won't be this chip that's holding you back.

The Core i9 10900K is the first time Intel has squeezed ten processing cores into its mainstream lineup. Given it's capable of hitting 5.3GHz (however briefly), it represents an impressive outing for the 14nm technology Intel has been tied to for so long. Gaming still benefits from high clock speeds, which still delivers; it doesn't make much sense given the competition.

You'll need to invest in a Z490 motherboard to go along with this chip and some serious cooling (a decent PSU wouldn't go amiss either). Don't be fooled by that reasonable 95W TDP, as it'll push way beyond that, especially if you're thinking of exploring its overclocking chops. 

Read the full Intel Core i9 10900K review.

7. AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

The best chip with integrated graphics

Specifications

Cores: 8

Threads: 16

Base Clock: 3.8 GHz

Turbo Clock: 4.6 GHz

Overclocking: Yes, 5.0-5.3 GHz typical

L3 Cache: 16 MB

TDP: 65 W

PCIe 3.0 lanes: 16

Reasons to buy

+The best Integrated GPU+Excellent thermals and power consumption+Strong all round performance

Reasons to avoid

-Lacks PCIe 4.0-Needs fast memory to be at its best-Expensive for an APU

AMD's APUs are the best processors to drop into your rig if you're not going to use a discrete graphics card, but still want a modicum of gaming performance out of your system. And the AMD Ryzen 7 5700G is the best of the latest Zen 3 based chips to deliver that.
Unlike previous APU offerings from AMD, the Ryzen 7 5700G is far more of a jack-of-all-trades chip because we are talking about an eight-core Zen 3 CPU component with 16 threads and a powerful Vega-based GPU to back it up. That makes this a chip that's almost up there with the best of the Ryzen 5000-series CPUs in processing power, but with the graphical grunt to deliver 1080p gaming on low settings in some seriously demanding titles.

In a GPU drought, that makes the 5700G a tantalizing APU as it will get your new gaming PC up and running. At the same time, you wait for discrete graphics cards to be available and without compromising too heavily on your system performance in the meantime.

The issue is that, as the 5700G is a monolithic design rather than chiplet, there are some performance differences compared to the standard Ryzen 7 5800X, a straight eight-core, 16-thread CPU without graphics. It also lacks PCIe 4.0 support to run the fastest SSDs and demands high-speed memory to make the most of its GPU power. But it's still an excellent all-around AMD processor and a handy option when graphics cards are still so rare.

Read our complete AMD Ryzen 7 5700G review.

Best gaming PC | Best gaming keyboard | Best gaming mouse
Best gaming chair | Best VR headset | Best graphics cards 

The best CPU for gaming FAQ

How do you test CPUs?

While gaming resolutions run from 720p to 4K, we largely test at 1080p. This will show the most significant difference in gaming performance you're likely to see and pushes the CPU into the spotlight instead of the GPU—an Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, in our case.

We've also used high-end G.Skill Trident Z and Flare X DDR4-3200 CL14 memory on all modern platforms, in either 2x 8GB or 4x 8GB configurations. Again, this is to eliminate any potential bottlenecks and let the CPUs reach their maximum performance. Liquid cooling was used on all CPUs, though for stock performance, we saw zero difference between that and the box coolers on those parts that included cooling.

The motherboards used in testing include the MSI MEG Z390 Godlike for Intel LGA1151, MSI MEG X570 Godlike, and Gigabyte X570 Aorus Master for third-gen Ryzen and MSI X470 Gaming M7 for first and second-gen Ryzen CPUs. AMD's APUs were tested on an MSI B350I Pro AC motherboard, as we needed something with video ports. For the HEDT platforms (not that we recommend those any longer for gaming purposes—or most other tasks), we used an Asus X299 Extreme Encore for Intel LGA2066, Asus ROG Zenith Extreme for TR4, and Zenith II Extreme for TRX40.

AMD CPU reviews:

Intel CPU reviews:

What motherboard is right for my CPU?

The latest AMD Ryzen 5000 CPUs still use the AM4 socket and are only compatible with X570, B550, and A520 motherboards (oh, and B450 and X470 motherboards). 

Whereas Intel's Comet Lake chips use the LGA 1200 socket, Rocket Lake has introduced new 500-series boards. Unless you're desperate for the still slightly awkward Intel PCIe 4.0 solution which the latest Intel chips offer, go with either a Z490 or cheaper B460 motherboard at this point for Intel. 

Is Intel or AMD better?

This is a rather loaded question. Right now, the consensus is that AMD has superior CPU technology, with its chiplet design allowing it to produce processors with far higher core counts at prices and thermal levels that Intel cannot match.

However, Intel has historically been better for gaming workloads, with an all-important advantage in single-core performance and instructions-per-clock (IPC). That has slowly been eroded by AMD's subsequent Zen architectures, to the point where there is little difference between them in gaming terms.

The other point to make is that most games are GPU-limited, which means the graphics card is the limiting factor in terms of performance, and you would likely see the same essential frame rates with either CPU manufacturer when a discrete graphics card is used.

Should I overclock my CPU?

The honest answer is: no. Overclocking your processor is not necessarily the risky move it once was, but equally, the benefits of doing so have drastically dropped in recent times. When we're talking about gaming performance, having a slightly higher clocked CPU can make a bit of a difference, but arguably your graphics card will be the part that limits the speed of your system.

There is also the point that overclocked CPUs create more heat, require more intensive and expensive cooling solutions, need those coolers to work harder, and are, therefore, often louder.

For us, overclocking your CPU to gain real-world performance benefits is not something we'd recommend most PC gamers do.

Jargon buster

Caching - A small segment of high-speed memory dedicated to storing and executing frequently used commands/instructions to speed up software execution. CPUs contain caches designated as Level 1, 2, and 3, with L1 being the fastest and smallest and L3 being the slowest and largest.

Core - Modern CPUs can contain anywhere from two to 70+ cores (in supercomputers), though CPUs housed in most consumer machines will generally carry between four and eight, with AMD's latest CPUs sporting up to 16 cores.

Clock speed - The speed at which a CPU can execute instructions, measured in hertz. A processor with a 3.7 GHz clock speed can process 3.7 billion instructions a second. Clock speed is one of the most critical factors for determining performance in games and workload functions.

Heat sink - A cooling solution for PCs that utilize fans or liquid cooling (active) or aluminum radiators (passive) that rely on convection to regulate a component's temperature.

Hyper-Threading (SMT) - Intel terminology for a tech that allows a processor to handle two sets of instructions 'threads' simultaneously. AMD and other CPU vendors call this SMT, Simultaneous Multi-Threading.

Socket type LGA (Land Grid Array), PGA (Pin Grid Array), or BGA (Ball Grid Array) - The way a CPU interfaces with the socket on a motherboard. LGA is used on Intel sockets with pins as part of the socket. AMD's AM4 solution, PGA, has the processors' pins, which fit into holes on the socket. AMD's Threadripper CPUs also use LGA sockets. A BGA socket is when the processor is permanently soldered to the motherboard, typically on a laptop.

TDP - Thermal design power, the maximum amount of heat a system or chip can produce that the attendant cooling system is designed to deal with under workload. This term can apply to PCs as a whole, GPUs, CPUs, or nearly any other performance component that generates heat and is in large part an indicator of how much power a part draws.

Thread - A thread refers to a series of CPU instructions for a specific program. Older CPUs and SMT disabled run one thread per core, but most modern AMD and Intel CPUs can simultaneously run two threads, sharing some resources (e.g., cache). 

Turbo Boost - Intel technology that allows processors to run at higher clock speeds under demanding loads. AMD also supports turbo or boost clocks, and we use the terms interchangeably regardless of CPU vendor.

Alan has been writing about PC tech since before 3D graphics cards existed, and still vividly recalls having to fight with MS-DOS just to get games to load. He fondly remembers the killer combo of a Matrox Millenium and 3dfx Voodoo, and seeing Lara Croft in 3D for the first time. He's very glad hardware has advanced as much as it has though, and is particularly happy when putting the latest M.2 NVMe SSDs, AMD processors, and laptops through their paces. He has a long-lasting Magic: The Gathering obsession but limits this to MTG Arena these days.

Sours: https://www.pcgamer.com/best-cpu-for-gaming/
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Best processors 2021: the best CPUs for your PC from Intel and AMD

Let one of the best processors of 2021 do the heavy lifting whether for gaming, video editing, or multi-tasking at work. Sure, lesser chips might see you through the most basic tasks, but it’s only their most powerful and efficient counterparts that can really handle your more demanding computing needs (and stay cool under pressure).

As your computer’s brain, a CPU is responsible for executing all its commands, tasks and processes. So, going for a mediocre one and hoping for the best, especially if you expect it to perform intensive tasks, isn’t going to cut it – no matter if you’re building a new PC or upgrading your current one. And, thanks to Intel and AMD still battling it out in the CPU arena, we have a lot more excellent options at more affordable prices.

With chips like the Comet Lake-S and the Ryzen 5000 more powerful and more affordable than ever before, you no longer have to settle for less or the second best if you’re on a budget. To make it easier for you to choose, we found the best processors on the market for playing the best PC games, getting through your creative workloads, and more.

What's the best processor for gaming?

One of the best processors on the market today, the AMD Ryzen 7 5800X, combines excellent single-core performance and a massively improved multi-core one with its low power consumption and a fairly approachable price. And, it’s a strong option for gaming.

Scratch that: it’s arguably the best processor for gaming. It even beats out the Intel Core i9-10900K in Total War: Three Kingdoms, a game optimized for Intel hardware, by 7%. Based on AMD’s 7nm manufacturing process, its Core Die (CCD) design allows for one Core Complex per die. That means every Ryzen 7 5800X’s CCX has 8 cores, each of which direct access to 32MB of L3 cache, resulting in a breathtaking gaming performance.

Best CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 5900X

Best CPU for high-end gaming

Specifications

Cores: 12

Threads: 24

Base clock: 3.7GHz

Boost clock: 4.8GHz

L3 cache: 64MB

TDP: 105W

Reasons to buy

+Amazing performance+A new single-core champion+Same power consumption

Reasons to avoid

-Price went up-No included cooler

The AMD Ryzen 9 5900X brings the biggest gen-on-gen jump in a single performance in years, making it a terrific upgrade. This latest release from AMD is not just a stronger processor across the board. It’s also an incredibly powerful processor for gaming and creative work full stop. The fact that you won’t need a new motherboard is just a nice perk.

Read the full review: AMD Ryzen 9 5900X

Best high-end CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 3950X

A mainstream CPU moonlights as an HEDT processor

Specifications

Cores: 16

Threads: 32

Base clock: 3.5GHz

Boost clock: 4.7GHz

L3 cache: 64MB

TDP: 105W

Reasons to buy

+Performance powerhouse+Cheaper than HEDT+PCIe 4.0

Reasons to avoid

-Needs extra cooling-Limited gaming advantage

The highest tier in the Ryzen 3000 series is the performance powerhouse you’re looking for, if you want something for heavily threaded computer work. Besides high-end gaming, the Ryzen 9 3950 also blasts through processing tasks. It’s expensive, but for a mainstream processor that can go toe-to-toe with HEDT processors, that’s hardly a surprise. And, it’s also well worth the price, if you need its level of performance. Just remember that it may take a bit to keep cool so be sure to follow AMD’s guidance.

Read the full review: AMD Ryzen 9 3950X

Best mid-range CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600X

Top performance on a budget

Specifications

Cores: 6

Threads: 12

Base clock: 3.8GHz

Boost clock: 4.4GHz

L3 cache: 32MB

TDP: 95W

Reasons to buy

+Excellent performance+Affordable+Includes a cooler

Reasons to avoid

-Still 6-cores

With more threads than the Intel Core i5-9600K, this mid-range graphics card delivers impressive multi-threading performance. However, the AMD Ryzen 5 3600X doesn’t just stop there: it takes that budget-minded stage of performance to a new level, with its increased IPC (instructions per clock) performance and a higher clock speed while staying at the same price point. It also stays competitive in even the most intense single-threaded applications.

Read the full review: AMD Ryzen 5 3600X

Best entry-level CPU: AMD Ryzen 3 3100

PC gaming just got cheaper

Specifications

Cores: 4

Threads: 8

Base clock: 3.5GHz

Boost clock: 3.6GHz

L3 cache: 16MB

TDP: 65W

Reasons to buy

+Excellent performance+Affordable+Doesn't suck up much power

Reasons to avoid

-Not as fast as the 3300X-May bottleneck high-end GPUs

Budget-minded consumers who missed out on all the 3rd-generation Ryzen excitement the first time will appreciate AMD’s latest attempt in the entry-level sphere. There’s no denying that the AMD Ryzen 3 3100 is appealingly cheap, but it does so without compromising on performance. In fact, this chip delivers a performance that could almost rival that of processors double its price, without sucking up much power. And, it’s an excellent choice for budget gamers who are looking for something that can handle 1080p gaming.

Read the full review: AMD Ryzen 3 3100

Best gaming CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X

Ryzen to the top

Specifications

Cores: 8

Threads: 16

Base clock: 3.8GHz

Boost clock: 4.7GHz

L3 cache: 32MB

TDP: 105W

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/news/best-processors

Best Workstation CPUs for 2021

If you're after the best processor for work, a lot of the decision boils down to just what your work is. Most processors can handle just about any workload you throw at them, given enough time. But faster CPUs (with more cores and/or faster clock speeds) chew through tough workloads in much less time, making them great CPUs for productivity. This list focuses on performance in productivity applications for workstations, while our Best CPUs for Gaming article will give you a better picture of gaming performance. For an even more in-depth look, our CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy has all the processors ranked based on performance in gaming, single- and multi-threaded workloads.

A processor that excels at gaming isn't always the best CPU if your workload is productivity-focused. In fact, as highly threaded CPUs become more common, gaming CPUs and work CPUs are increasingly different silicon beasts, making it tougher to choose which CPU is the best for your workload. So we've compiled a list of processors representing the best bang for your buck in common productivity tasks, based on our years of benchmarking and testing data.

As for recent releases, the workstation CPU market is in a lull as we await the arrival of AMD's next-gen Threadripper processors. Those processors should shake up our rankings when they come to market before the end of 2021.

For now, AMD's Threadripper Pro 3995WX remains the most powerful workstation processor on the market. This fire-breathing 64-core 128-thread processor is aimed right at the meat of the OEM workstation market, but now it's available through retail channels, too. This chip comes armed with eight memory channels and 128 lanes of PCIe 4.0 connectivity, marking a big advantage over the consumer-class Threadripper processors described below. However, in most workloads, its high price point might not be worth the slim performance advantages over the consumer models, meaning that its higher number of memory channels is the primary draw. 

Luckily, supply has improved for workstation processors, and now you can find most of these chips at retail near or below recommended pricing. However, there are still pockets of reduced supply, so we've included alternate recommendations as well. 

Quick Shopping Tips

When choosing a non-gaming-focused CPU, consider the following:

  • Know the apps you use: If your apps take advantage of superior core counts or memory channels, you might want to get an AMD chip. But if you're using lightly-threaded apps or want the broadest spate of officially supported software, Intel tends to perform better.
  • Get the latest gen: You usually won't save a lot by going with an older chip, and you may limit your upgrade options down the road.
  • Keep the motherboard in mind: The priciest CPUs require more expensive motherboards than cheaper chips.

For even more information, check out our 2020 CPU Buyer’s Guide, where we discuss how much you should spend for what you’re looking to do, and when cores matter more than high clock speeds.

Best processors for productivity at a glance:

1. AMD Threadripper 3995WX
2. AMD Threadripper 3970X
3. AMD Ryzen 9 5950X
4. AMD Ryzen 7 5900X
5. AMD Ryzen 5 5600X
6. AMD Ryzen 5 3600

Best Desktop CPUs for Work 2021

1. AMD Threadripper 3995WX

Best Highest-End Workstation CPU

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 2

Socket: sTRX4

Cores/Threads: 64/128

Base Frequency: 2.7 GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.2 GHz

TDP: 280W

Reasons to buy

+Excellent rendering performance+Competitive performance in GPU-accelerated applications+Eight-Channel memory interface+128 Lanes of PCIe 4.0+Fully-validated ECC memory support

Reasons to avoid

-Benefits a narrow cross-section of workloads

Intel's seemingly endless delay in transitioning to the 10nm node and a new architecture has left the industry ripe for disruption. As a result, AMD's Threadripper 3000 processors rule the upper segment of the HEDT market uncontested. The Threadripper 3990X established itself as the fire-breathing standard-bearer for the entire consumer market, but AMD has brought a very similar model to retail that's specifically designed for workstations.

AMD's Threadripper 3995WX slots in as the workstation market's uncontested leader in multi-threaded work with 64 cores, 128 threads, and supports up to 2TB of memory spread out among eight memory channels, not to mention 128 lanes of PCIe 4.0 connectivity. AMD also has less-pricey downstream WX models, too. 

The Zen 3-powered Threadripper 3995WX is pretty much exactly what AMD says it is: A highly specialized processor that provides incredible performance in a narrow cross-section of workloads, but at an extremely attractive price point given its capabilities.

AMD's decision to pair 64 cores and 128 threads with higher boost frequencies pays big dividends in VFX, 3D animation, and ray tracing workloads with more performance than you would expect from any comparable workstation-class solution, not to mention even some dual-socket servers. The higher boost frequencies provide snappy performance in everyday lightly-threaded applications and devastating threaded performance in workloads that scale well. 

The $5,489 price tag is eye-watering, but for professionals that can benefit from the 3995WX's hefty allotment of cores and threads, it's worth every penny. If you are looking for a more price-conscious model and don't need support for eight memory channels or 128 lanes of PCIe 4.0 connectivity, then the consumer-oriented 64-Core Threadripper 3990X makes for a nice alternative. 

Read:AMD Threadripper Pro 3995WX Review

2. AMD Threadripper 3970X

Best High-End Workstation CPU

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 2

Socket: sTRX4

Cores/Threads: 32/64

Base Frequency: 3.7GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.5GHz

TDP: 280W

Reasons to buy

+Excellent single and multithreaded performance+Competitive per-core pricing+Power efficient+Indium solder

Reasons to avoid

-Lack of backward compatibility

While the Threadripper 3990X/3995WX brings the utmost performance possible to bear, the exotic design does result in slower performance in some common workloads, leaving room for the Threadripper 3970X to serve as the more reasonable option for the productivity-minded. 

The 32-core, 64-thread Threadripper 3970X delivers devastating threaded performance in its price range, often trouncing Intel's most exotic silicon. Intel's Xeon W-3175X is ill-suited to take on the comparatively power-sipping Threadripper processors on a power efficiency basis, not to mention pricing. Threadripper 3000 also brings a solid gain on the single-threaded performance front, too. 

AMD's forward-thinking adoption of the PCIe 4.0 interface is another attraction that will help win over the semi-professional crowd. While the faster interface isn't as useful on the mainstream desktop, the ability to stack up throughput-craving devices behind the chipset without the radical throughput restrictions we see with Intel's DMI is another big win.

Read: AMD Threadripper 3970X Review

3. Intel Core i9-10980XE

Alternate Pick - Best High-End Desktop (HEDT) CPU

Specifications

Architecture: Cascade Lake-X (Skylake)

Socket: LGA 2066

Cores/Threads: 18/36

Base Frequency: 3.0GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.8GHz

TDP: 165W

Reasons to buy

+Incremental performance improvements+Lower power consumption+Overclockability+Backward compatibility

Reasons to avoid

-Price-Dead-end platform-PCIe3.0

The Core i9-10980XE is a solid alternative pick, just be aware that you'll sacrifice quite a bit of threaded horsepower by selecting the Core i9-10980XE. 

For streamers and professionals who can make use of the extra I/O of and quad-channel memory, Intel’s Cascade Lake-X flagship earns its niche, but the Ryzen 5950X and 3950X are a better value for most productivity workloads where the more-robust HEDT platform is less important.  

That leaves a preciously slim slice of the market where Intel has an advantage in this price bracket (users that need quad-channel memory or more PCIe lanes). Overclocking performance is a factor if you're willing to spend the cash. You can drop the -10980XE into an existing X299 board if you're willing to sacrifice a few PCIe lanes, but be aware that this is the end of the line for the X299 platform.

The 14nm process equates to faster clock speeds, and thus performance, at lower overall power consumption. The Core i9-10980XE also has much higher overclocking headroom than its predecessor. But the 10980XE’s advantage after tuning over the AMD Ryzen 5950X comes at a $280 premium and requires more robust cooling and power delivery, so you should factor that into your purchasing decision. In most cases, the Ryzen 9 5950X and 3950X, both listed below, remain the better choice if you can find those chips on shelves. 

Read: Intel Core i9-10980XE Review

4. AMD Ryzen 9 5950X

Best High Performance Value

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 3

Socket: AM4

Cores/Threads: 16/32

Base Frequency: 3.4GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.9GHz

TDP: 105W

Reasons to buy

+Class-leading 16 cores & 32 threads+Overclockable+Higher boost frequencies+Reasonable price-per-core+Power efficiency+PCIe Gen 4.0

Reasons to avoid

-Requires beefy cooling-No bundled cooler-Higher gen-on-gen pricing-No integrated graphics

High end desktop (HEDT) processors have long offered the ultimate in performance, as long as you were willing to pay the price. Aside from high pricing, HEDT chips also require expensive accommodations, like beefy motherboards and the added cost of fully populating quad-channel memory controllers. Add in the inevitable trade-offs, like reduced performance in lightly-threaded applications and games, and any cost-conscious users who could benefit from the threaded horsepower of a HEDT chip just settle for mainstream offerings.

AMD's Ryzen 9 5950X, with 16 cores and 32 threads, expands on its predecessors' mission of bringing HEDT-class performance to mainstream motherboards, lowering the bar for entry. The 5950X carries a $799 price tag, but that’s downright affordable compared to competing HEDT processors that don't offer the same class of performance. You can even find it for as low as $750. 

The Ryzen 9 5950X's healthy slathering of cores and threads are incredibly adept at productivity workloads. Still, it does come with a dual-channel memory controller that can restrict performance in workloads constrained by memory throughput. However, outside of that notable restriction, if you're after a chip and platform that can do serious work seriously fast, but still be nimble enough to deliver high-refresh gameplay at the end of the day, the Ryzen 9 5950X fits the bill like no other CPU before it, blurring the lines between HEDT and mainstream platforms. 

Read: AMD Ryzen 9 3950X Review

5. AMD Ryzen 9 3950X

Alternate Pick - Best High Performance Value

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 2

Socket: AM4

Cores/Threads: 16/32

Base Frequency: 3.5GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.7GHz

TDP: 105W

Reasons to buy

+Class-leading 16 cores & 32 threads+Overclockable+Higher boost frequencies+Reasonable price-per-core+Power efficiency+Compatible with most AM4 boards+PCIe Gen 4.0

Reasons to avoid

-Requires beefy cooling-Limited overclocking headroom

The Ryzen 9 3950X is a previous-gen processor, and we typically don't recommend investing in older chips for productivity-focused builds. However, given sporadic chip shortages, the Ryzen 9 3950X might be the only option at times if you're looking for a 16-core 32-thread processor to drop into a mainstream motherboard. 

AMD's 16-core 32-thread Ryzen 9 3950X brings HEDT-class performance to mainstream motherboards, lowering the bar for entry. The 3950X carries a $749 MSRP, but you can find this nimble chip for ~$715 at retail. 

Read: AMD Ryzen 9 3950X Review

6. AMD Ryzen 9 5900X

Best Overall Value

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 3

Socket: AM4

Cores/Threads: 12/24

Base Frequency: 3.7GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.8GHz

TDP: 65W

Reasons to buy

+Support for PCIe 4.0+Unlocked multiplier+Compatible with 500-series motherboards+Excellent gaming performance +Excellent single- and multi-threaded performance

Reasons to avoid

-No bundled cooler-Higher gen-on-gen pricing-No integrated graphics

If you’re truly only concerned about the best gaming CPU and basic productivity tasks, you should go with the Ryzen 5 5600X and save yourself some money. However, if you prize a brutal mix of performance in all aspects, like single- and multi-threaded work and gaming, the Ryzen 9 5900X is your chip – it delivers in all facets. 

The 12-core 24-thread Ryzen 9 5900X is rated for a 3.7 GHz base and 4.8 GHz boost, but we clocked it in at 5.0 GHz during our own testing. Not only is the 5900X incredibly potent in threaded applications given its price point - it is also the uncontested fastest gaming chip on the market, so you'll get the best of both worlds. 

There’s also support for PCIe 4.0 and overclockability to consider. The Ryzen 9 5900X drops into existing 500-series and some 400-series motherboards (be sure to assure compatibility). You'll need to bring your own cooler, and the bigger, the better — cooling definitely has an impact on performance with the higher-end Ryzen 5000 processors. However, if you're looking for a chip with a great mixture of both single- and heavily-threaded performance, the Ryzen 9 5900X is a great option. 

Read:AMD Ryzen 9 5900X Review

8. AMD Ryzen 5 5600X

Best Budget CPU

Specifications

Architecture: Zen 3

Socket: AM4

Cores/Threads: 6 / 12

Base Frequency: 4.1GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.8GHz

TDP: 65W

Reasons to buy

+Strong gaming performance+Strong in single- and multi-threaded workloads+Relatively easy to cool+PCIe 4.0+Bundled cooler+Power efficiency+Works with existing 500-series motherboards

Reasons to avoid

-Higher gen-on-gen pricing

The AMD Ryzen 5 5600X offers a compelling blend of pricing and performance in its price range, but the six-core 12-thread chip lands at $299, a $50 price hike over its previous-gen counterpart. However, the 5600X brings more than enough extra application performance to justify the premium, not to mention that it's the most power-efficient desktop PC processor we've ever tested. That means it is easier to cool than competing chips in its price range, ultimately resulting in a quieter system.

AMD's Zen 3 microarchitecture results in a stunning 19% increase in IPC, which floats all boats in terms of performance in gaming, single-threaded, and multi-threaded applications. The 5600X serves up more than enough performance for day-to-day application workloads, but you'll need to align your expectations with the fact that this is a six-core processor. That said, you won't find this level of performance from any other six-core chip on the market. If entertainment is also on the menu, the 5600X is an incredibly well-rounded chip that can handle any type of gaming, from competitive-class performance with high refresh rate monitors to streaming.

The Ryzen 5 5600X has a 3.7 GHz base and 4.6 GHz boost clock, but with the right cooling and motherboard, you can expect higher short-term boosts. The chip also has a 65W TDP rating, meaning it runs exceptionally cool and quiet given its capabilities (the previous-gen model was 95W). 

Existing AMD owners with a 500-series motherboard will breathe a sigh of relief as the 5600X drops right into existing 500-series motherboards, and some 400-series models (be sure to check compatibility lists). If you need a new motherboard to support the chip, both 400- and 500-series motherboards are plentiful and relatively affordable, with the B550 lineup offering the best overall value for this class of chip. 

Read: AMD Ryzen 5 5600X Review: The Mainstream Knockout

4. Intel Core i5-11400

Best Mid-Range CPU

Specifications

Architecture: Rocket Lake

Socket: LGA 1200

Cores/Threads: 6/12

Base Frequency: 2.6GHz

Top Boost Frequency: 4.4GHz

TDP: 65W

Reasons to buy

+Solid gaming and application performance+PCIe 4.0+Bundled cooler+Memory overclocking

Reasons to avoid

-Power consumption

The Core i5-11400 represents the lowest-end processor we'd recommend for a productivity-focused machine. The 11400 is the best budget chip on the market, largely because AMD's only competing chip comes in the form of the two-year-old Ryzen 5 3600 that can't compete with the more modern 11400. You can also pick up the graphics-less Core i5-11400F for $157, which is a steal given its performance. (Remember, the 11400F will perform the same as the non-F model, but you lose QuickSync.) 

Taken as a whole, the Core i5-11400 has a better blend of performance than the Ryzen 5 3600 throughout our full suite of application tests. The 11400's large lead in single-threaded work is impressive, and its only deficiencies in threaded work come when it is topped with its stock cooler. The 11400 roughly matches the 3600 in threaded work with a better cooler, even with the power limits strictly enforced, while removing those limits gives the 11400 uncontested lead.

The Core i5-11400 supports the PCIe 4.0 interface. Additionally, B-series motherboards, which make the best pairing with this chip, support both memory overclocking and lifting the power limits, both of which yield huge dividends.  You'll have to overlook the higher power consumption if you go with the Core i5-11400, especially if you remove the power limits. Intel's stock cooler is also largely worthless, so you should budget for a better cooler. 

 Read: Intel Core i5-11400 Review

MORE: Best Gaming CPUs
MORE:
Best Cheap CPUs

Discounts on the Best Desktop CPUs

Whether you're buying one of the best CPUs we listed above or one that didn't quite make the cut, you may find some savings by checking our list of coupon codes, especially our lists of Newegg promo codes and Micro Center coupons.

Paul Alcorn is the Deputy Managing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He writes news and reviews on CPUs, storage and enterprise hardware.

Sours: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-performance-cpus,5683.html

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The Fastest CPU on the Planet - HOLY $H!T - EPYC Milan 7763 64 Core

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