College football rainout rules

College football rainout rules DEFAULT

quote:

Suspending the Game ARTICLE 3. a. The referee may suspend the game temporarily when conditions warrant such action. b. When the game is stopped by actions of a person(s) not subject to the rules or for any other reasons not in the rules and cannot continue, the referee shall: 1. Suspend play and direct the players to their team areas. 2. Refer the problem to those responsible for the game’s management. 3. Resume the game when he determines conditions are satisfactory. c. If a game is suspended under Rules 3-3-3-a and b before the end of the fourth period and cannot be resumed, there are four possible options: 1. Resume the game at a later date; 2. Terminate the game with a determined final score; 3. Forfeit of the game; or 4. Declare a no contest. The option that takes effect shall be determined by conference policy if both institutions are members of the same conference. In non-conference competition, the directors of athletics at the participating institutions or their designees, in consultation with the coaches, must agree on one of the four options. This agreement will include the final score if the game is terminated (Rule 8-1-2). d. If a game is suspended under Rules 3-3-3-a and b after four periods of play and cannot be resumed, the game shall be ruled a tie. The final score shall be the score at the end of the last completed period. (Note: If a winner must be determined in a conference playoff game, conference policy shall determine when and where the game will be resumed.) e. A suspended game, if resumed, will begin with the same time remaining and under the identical conditions of down, distance, field position and player eligibility.


Sours: https://www.secrant.com/rant/sec-football/ncaa-rules-re-delay-suspension-of-games/44185538/

1. Weather can impact any sport, but college football is especially vulnerable.

For one thing, college football has less top-level structure than most of America’s major sports. It’s on individual schools and conferences to figure out emergency rescheduling.

While each pro league has a handful of teams in the places that get the brunt of hurricane season, dozens of college teams are along the coasts. And hurricane season usually peaks around the beginning of college football season. These days, more than a dozen FBS games are liable to get canceled, relocated, or postponed each year.

This isn’t limited to just hurricanes. For example, wildfires on the West Coast in 2017 and 2018 altered practice and game schedules.

2. Teams have to prepare for weather delays by having lots of snacks stocked.

The NCAA has a rule against active play when there’s lightning in the area, and a few games per season catch lightning delays. These can go on for hours.

Players scarfed down pizza and Chick-fil-A during one between Michigan State and Penn State, while fans spent the three-hour layoff having lots of fun.

3. If weather affects a non-conference game, it might just get canceled.

Most every game contract has a clause about bad weather. Normally, teams can pull out of a game without financial penalty if weather has made playing or traveling unsafe.

In 2017, Miami canceled a trip to Arkansas State because Hurricane Irma could’ve made traveling home a logistical nightmare. That contract said:

This contract shall be void with respect to any of the games in the event that it becomes impossible to play such game(s) by reason of unforeseen catastrophe or disaster such as fire, flood, earthquake, war, [epidemic] confiscation, by order of government, military, or public authority of prohibitory or injunctive orders of any competent judicial or other government authority. Notice of such catastrophe or disaster shall be given as soon as possible. No such cancellation shall affect the parties/ obligations as to subsequent games covered by this contract. Any games not played as scheduled shall be rescheduled as such exigencies may dictate or permit.

If a non-conference game gets canceled, it’s not normally a huge deal. Most commonly, those are games between a Power 5 team and a smaller school that’s getting paid a few hundred thousand dollars to lose. Maybe the home team will still pay the guarantee amount anyway, as Florida did after lightning limited a 2014 Idaho game to exactly one play.

It’s not always that smooth. After Miami canceled its 2017 trip, the Red Wolves sued for $650,000 in damages.

4. Conference games are obviously trickier, since they could have long-term consequences for a dozen teams, rather than just two.

“It’s a really significant difference, being a non-conference game vs. an SEC game,” Florida AD Scott Stricklin said in 2017 about canceling a game against FCS Northern Colorado after canceling against rival LSU the year prior, which became a big mess. “SEC game, the league office is gonna be much more involved because obviously they have two members with a stake in the game.”

5. Games get postponed and canceled, but also relocated. That can be a whole other logistical puzzle.

“I actually called Jay Jacobs at Auburn, the AD at Auburn — they’re at Clemson this weekend — just to say, ‘Would your stadium be available?’ and he was open to it,” Stricklin said. “He was, ‘Absolutely, let me know how we could help,’ and we told him just to sit tight and don’t contact anybody. And in our internal talks, we decided that didn’t make any sense. We were just poking around at all the options, to make sure you flesh everything out.”

These days, a few games per year end up being played elsewhere.

6. The whole region matters. Even if the stadium is safe, weather changes more than just the stadium itself.

Why cancel, postpone, or relocate a game that was about to be played on a dry field? To keep the state’s emergency resources near people in danger and to avoid forcing people to travel through bad weather.

“There’s a number of things to keep in consideration,” said UCF executive associate AD David Hansen, who has experience with weather impacting games. “Number one: the people that have to travel to your town for the game. The visiting team, the game officials, television personnel — is it feasible for those people to travel? Are there hotel rooms available before, but maybe they aren’t available now because first responders have come into your community?

“There’s a lot of logistics there that you have to have firm commitments for. And either before or after a storm, it’s impossible to commit to a football game.”

“You have foremost in your mind the safety of everyone involved. A game is important, and you do the best you can do play it, but you don’t wanna place people in peril in doing so,” South Alabama AD Joel Erdmann told us during the ‘17 hurricane season. Erdmann’s Jaguars had a game canceled in 2016, the result of LSU-Florida fallout. “It can be a time that’s filled with anxiety, but at the same time, you’re prepared.”

7. Because of all this, athletic departments keep a close eye on forecasts ahead of time.

“You’re constantly staring at a radar, and you’re constantly getting the best information you can from the experts in the field of forecasting,” Erdmann told us.

Athletic departments also assign specific staffers to monitor weather.

Former Florida associate AD Chip Howard was involved with the Gators’ lengthy Idaho game delay in 2014.

‘The lightning, when it’s 15 miles [away], we let the coaches know and the referee,’ Howard said. ‘And then when it hits at eight miles, you’re starting to doubt. That’s the easy part of it. The hard part is trying to figure out and forecast, because you’ve got television, you’ve got two coaches that are intense and highly competitive, and you’ve got the fans to worry about, first and foremost. We have pretty precise protocols that we institute as soon as that happens. So, all that stuff just kind of happens by plan, what doesn’t happen is, OK how long is it going to be? Immediately when you have a lightning strike, it’s 30 minutes before you can resume play,’ per NCAA rules.

Most teams have a centralized way to monitor weather. Sometimes campuses have their own, and sometimes they use common services like AccuWeather. Florida has a volunteer lightning researcher who sits in with operations staff during games. Marshall uses third-party software specifically to track lightning.

‘The biggest factor after all that rain was our field was not good,’ Howard said. ‘I’m walking the field with the referee, and the referee’s saying, “You know, this is not safe.” You know our field drains great, but there’s only so much water you can put on the field.’

8. You’d think when there’s a devastating storm, people would put aside petty rooting interests and support each other instead of claiming the other side is scared to play. Right?

This is college football. No.

9. But sometimes, as long as everyone stays safe, inclement weather is actually welcome.

James Lang-USA TODAY Sports

Sign up for the newsletter The Read Option

A daily-ish mini-column on the college football thing of the day, with some other stuff too.

Sours: https://www.bannersociety.com/college-football/2018/8/30/17398870/college-football-weather-delays-canceled
  1. White enamel wall decor
  2. Antique wooden candle box
  3. Passion twist hair extensions

College football forfeit rules, by conference: Explaining each Power 5 league's COVID-19 guidelines

Share

College football officiating-082521-GETTY-FTR

Power 5 conferences have no sympathy for teams that can't play games due to COVID-19 in the 2021 college football season.

The 2020 season was tumultuous, one that saw several games rescheduled (such as Alabama-LSU) or outright canceled (such as Michigan-Ohio State) as the coronavirus made its way through the country with no vaccine to speak of. One season later, the vaccine is widely available, meaning teams will assume significantly more responsibility if they're unable to play a game due to the virus.

That is reflected in each of the Power 5 conference's forfeiture and rescheduling guidelines in regard to the COVID-19 pandemic. Whereas the 2020 season focused more on rescheduling games and "no contest" declarations, the 2021 season will see significantly more forfeitures if a team can't play because of the coronavirus.

MORE: One thing Big Ten, Pac-12, ACC alliance must not do is slow college football playoff expansion

Each of the Power 5 conferences seem to align in their stances as college football attempts a return to normalcy. That said, there are several discrepancies among the respective guidelines, including ability to reschedule, team liability and financial penalties.

With that, Sporting News breaks down Power 5 COVID-19 forfeiture rules, conference by conference:

COVID-19 forfeit rules by conference

SEC

Forfeits: Yes
Rescheduling available: No

The SEC aligns with the other Power 5 conferences in assigning forfeits to teams that can't play a game "due to COVID-19, injuries or other reasons." It also joins the ACC in assigning forfeits to multiple teams if neither can play an assigned game for the reasons mentioned:

"In the event a team is unable to begin or complete a regular season conference event due to the unavailability of participants (due to COVID-19, injuries or other reasons), that team will forfeit the contest and will be assigned a loss in the conference standings. The opposing team that is ready to play will be credited with a win in the conference standings. Both teams will be deemed to have played and completed the contest for purpose of the conference standings.

If both teams are unable to compete due to the unavailability of participants (due to COVID-19, injuries or other reasons), both teams shall be deemed to have forfeited the game, with a loss assigned to both teams and applied to the conference standings. Both teams will be deemed to have played and completed the contest for purpose of the conference standings."

That said, SEC commissioner Greg Sankey can declare a no contest "if extraordinary circumstances warrant." Any team that suffers financial loss due to an opponent's inability to play could be reimbursed by the SEC, per the league's announcement (pending review from the conference's executive committee:

Big Ten

Forfeits: Yes
Rescheduling available: Yes (if both teams unable to play)

The Big Ten will force any team that can't play because of COVID-19 to forfeit a contest, unless its opponent cannot play either, in which case the game would be considered a "no contest" if the game can't be rescheduled. The conference released forfeiture guidelines for both those instances, and another in which games can't be played that affect conference standings.

From the Big Ten :

  • Competition involving two Teams. If a team is unable to participate in a scheduled conference competition due to COVID-19 and as a result the competition is unable to occur on the calendar day on which it is scheduled, the competition shall be considered a forfeit by the team unable to participate and shall not be rescheduled. In such case, the team unable to participate shall be assessed a “loss,” its opponent a “win,” and conference standings shall be adjusted accordingly.
  • Competition involving two Teams. If both of the two competing teams are unable to participate in a scheduled conference competition due to COVID-19 and as a result the competition is unable to occur on the calendar day on which it is scheduled, and is unable to be rescheduled, the competition shall be considered a “no contest.”
  • Competition involving three or more teams. If a team is unable to participate in a scheduled conference competition due to COVID-19 and team performance in the competition impacts conference standings, a team unable to participate due to COVID-19 will be considered to have forfeited the competition. In such case, a team unable to participate shall be assessed a “loss,” each of its opponents a “win,” and conference standings shall be adjusted accordingly. If team performance in the competition does not impact conference standings and/or the involved sport is one in which there are no conference standings, no further action shall be taken.

MORE: Alliance between Big Ten, ACC and Pac-12 has many facets, but power is at the core

ACC

Forfeits: Yes
Rescheduling available: No

The ACC has among the stricter COVID-19 rescheduling policies. Like the other Power 5 conferences, a team that is ruled at fault for a game's cancellation will forfeit. Where the ACC differs from its counterparts is what happens when both teams are unable to play a game due to COVID: In that case, instead of a "no contest," both teams will forfeit the competition.

From the ACC :

  • If a 2021 ACC game cannot be played on its originally scheduled date by a team unable to play due to an insufficient number of available players related to COVID-19, that team shall be deemed to have forfeited, with a loss assigned to the team unable to play and a win assigned to its scheduled opponent, with both the loss and win, respectively, applied to the conference standings.
  • If a 2021 ACC game cannot be played on its originally scheduled date due to any factor(s) directly associated with a Game Discontinuation Consideration as listed in the current ACC Medical Advisory Group (MAG) Report, the Conference’s sport rescheduling policy shall apply.
  • If a 2021 ACC game cannot be played on its originally scheduled date due to both teams being unable to play due to an insufficient number of available players related to COVID-19, both teams shall be deemed to have forfeited, with a loss assigned to both teams and applied to the conference standings.

Pac-12

Forfeits: Yes
Rescheduling available: No

The Pac-12 will declare any game that can't be played a forfeiture for the at-fault team, with its opponent being granted a win.

Commissioner George Kliavkoff has the sole discretion to determine whether a team is at fault, though the conference provided no guidelines for how vaccines and breakthrough cases affect a team's liability or what happens if both teams are unable to play. A two-thirds majority vote from an administrative committee is necessary to overturn any such decision by Kliavkoff.

From the Pac-12 :

“Following consultation with the Pac-12 Athletic Directors Committee, the Pac-12 has determined that its prior longstanding game forfeiture rule (set forth in 2021-22 Pac-12 Administrative Policies referenced below), that was temporarily modified for this past season due to COVID-19, shall once again be applied for this coming athletic season. In accordance with that rule, if an institution is unable to play a contest through its own fault, it shall forfeit such contest to its opponent.

Any forfeited contest shall be regarded as a conference loss for the team making the forfeit and a conference win for its opponent. The Pac-12 rule provides the commissioner with discretion to determine whether an institution is at fault or primarily at fault for an inability to play a contest based on the facts of the situation.”

Big 12

Forfeits: Yes
Rescheduling available: No

The Big 12 has ruled any team that can't play due to COVID-19 will forfeit, except in cases where its opponent can't field a team. In that case, the game will be ruled a "no contest" with no apparent opportunity to reschedule. Moreover, forfeits can be declared at any time before a contest is completed, though preferably before the visiting team travels. Unbalanced tie-break rules will be used to determine conference standings and championship game participants.

From the Big 12 :

"The Big 12 Conference has set its game threshold policy for the upcoming season. In the event a conference game is canceled due to a team not having enough student-athletes to compete (due to COVID-19 or for any reason), that team will forfeit and will be credited with a loss in the conference standings. The opponent will be credited with a win in the conference standings. Both teams will be deemed to have played the game for purposes of conference standings only.

A forfeit can be declared at any point before a completed contest, and when possible would occur prior to the visiting team commencing travel. Additionally, if both teams are unable to compete, a no contest would be declared and, if needed, an unbalanced tiebreaker would be utilized to determine Conference championship participants in football or championship seeding in other sports. The commissioner retains discretion to declare a no contest if extraordinary circumstances warrant."

Will-Levis-112425-GETTY-FTR.jpg

College football picks, predictions against the spread for every Week 7 top 25 game

Bender: Georgia-UK and more Week 7 picks vs. the spread

chris-olave-1010-getty-FTR.jpg

Iowa and Co. still chasing Ohio State in Big Ten, plus more winners and losers from Week 6

Bender: The Big Ten race, plus Week 6 winners, losers

Zamir White-Stetson Bennet-101021-GETTY-FTR

College football polls: Updated AP Top 25, Coaches Poll rankings after Week 6

Updated rankings after Week 6

Bryce Young-Michael Clemons-101021-GETTY-FTR

College football rankings: What Alabama's loss to Texas A&M means for Georgia, Iowa and more

How Bama's loss affects college football rankings

Nick-Saban-101021-Getty-FTR

By the numbers: Alabama's loss to Texas A&M ends long-running streaks

By the numbers: Alabama's loss to Texas A&M ends long-running streaks

More

Sours: https://www.sportingnews.com/us/ncaa-football/news/college-football-forfeit-rules-by-conference/1fz3lzhit3rxk1qy22qd2biq0b

Storms could lead to a delay. Once lightning is spotted in the immediate area, a delay is called. NCAA rules state that there is to be a minimum of a 30-minute suspension of play after the lightning strike. Therefore, there has to be at least a half-hour delay in play from the final lightning strike near the stadium.


Click to see full answer


Similarly one may ask, will they cancel a college football game due to weather?

Games can also be delayed or canceled for other forms of inclement weather, or if the field is found to be unfit for play, and for other unusual causes such as bee swarms. If a game is rained out before play begins, it is rescheduled for a later date.

Beside above, what happens when a college football game is Cancelled? Bets on canceled games will be graded as no action, and your money will be refunded. Even if the game is rescheduled, the lines will re-open the week prior and you'll have to make your wager again at the new prices.

Keeping this in consideration, what happens if a football game is delayed?

In American football, an offensive team is penalized five yards for delay of game if it fails to put the ball in play by either snap or free kick before the play clock expires. This time limit varies by league, and is often 25 seconds from the time the referee signals the ball ready for play.

Do they cancel college football games?

1. Weather can impact any sport, but college football is especially vulnerable. And hurricane season usually peaks around the beginning of college football season. These days, more than a dozen FBS games are liable to get canceled, relocated, or postponed each year.

Sours: https://findanyanswer.com/how-long-will-they-delay-a-college-football-game-due-to-weather

Football rainout rules college

The college football season starts during hurricane season, with games all across the country. That makes for lots of run-ins with weather, at the start of the season and into the late fall. We spoke with folks from television, game operations, and coaching to see what it’s really like to go through a weather delay.

Staffers are monitoring weather throughout.

Former Florida associate AD Chip Howard was involved with the Gators’ lengthy Idaho game delay in 2014, due to lightning in the Gainesville area.

“The lightning when it’s 15 miles [away], we let the coaches know and the referee,” Howard said. “And then when it hits at eight miles, you’re starting to doubt. That’s the easy part of it. The hard part is trying to figure out and forecast, because you've got television, you've got two coaches that are intense and highly competitive, and you’ve got the fans to worry about, first and foremost. We have pretty precise protocols that we institute as soon as that happens. So, all that stuff just kind of happens by plan, what doesn’t happen is ‘OK how long is it going to be?’ Immediately when you have a lightning strike, it’s 30 minutes before you can resume play,” per NCAA rules.

Most teams have a centralized way to monitor weather. Sometimes campuses have their own, and sometimes they use common services like AccuWeather. Florida has a volunteer lightning researcher who sits in with operations staff during games. Marshall uses third-party software specifically to track lightning.

“The biggest factor after all that rain was our field was not good,” Howard said. “I’m walking the field with the referee, and the referee’s saying, ‘You know, this is not safe.’ You know our field drains great, but there’s only so much water you can put on the field.”

After one play and then a three-hour delay, the Gators called the Idaho game.

During a delay, coaches suddenly have a lot of new stuff to manage.

A Marshall-West Virginia game in 2011 lasted nearly eight hours and cut short in the fourth quarter, thanks to lightning around Morgantown.

“I think the biggest thing, our concerns, were the safety of the kids,” Marshall head coach Doc Holliday told SB Nation. “Because, you know, that game started at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, I think, and at 11 o’clock at night, or whatever it was, we’re still there. Those kids eat their pregame meal four hours prior to the game, so they hadn’t eaten since 11 o’clock that day, and we weren’t prepared for that.”

A lengthy delay means more time for coaching, but only so much.

“You just stay positive as coaches,” Holliday said. “You get around the kids as soon as you get in there, and make corrections and those things, and then other than that, there’s [only] so much talking you can do.”

Being the road team usually means more of a challenge.

“You always expect to win the game regardless,” Holliday said of trailing on the scoreboard during the delay. “That game was not totally out of hand at any point, so it was no question a real challenge for us as coaches, and like I said, I think when you’re on the road, it’s even more difficult challenge, because the locker rooms are so cramped and so small and so crowded, you just don’t have the room where kids can relax like they need to.”

Marshall players had to have their postgame meal, turkey subs from Firehouse, delivered during one of the delays.

Marshall now travels with an emergency kit, which also sits in storage for home games. It has granola bars, Slim Jims, peanuts, “just anything that has caloric content and a little bit of salt to it,” Thundering Herd game manager Mark Gayle said.

“It could feed probably the east side of about any stadium in the U.S.”

Feeding 100 players on short notice often literally means fast food.

During the Florida-Idaho delay, the Vandals ordered from across the street.

“Our players hadn’t eaten for a long period of time, so we had to get ahold of Jimmy John’s,” Idaho AD Rob Spear said.

During a Penn State-Michigan delay in 2017, teams had everything from sandwiches to pizza. Fox Sports’ Bruce Feldman reported:

“Some guys took naps, other players just stretched out. There was about 120 Chick-fil-A sandwiches that were brought in for Penn State; for Michigan State, it was about the same amount from Potbelly’s. Penn State went out and bought about $500 worth of protein bars and produce just to keep energized and hydrated.”

Staffers have to keep players ready on uncertain notice.

“That was the hard part of just, ‘OK, we’re getting ready to go,’“ former Florida special teams coordinator Coleman Hutzler said. “So you get them warmed up, you get them sweating again, and then boom, you’re back down to, ‘OK relax guys, we got another 30.”

Fans who have to leave the stadium get creative, too!

Some Mountaineer fans passed the time during the Marshall delays with some mud slidin’.

Fans can typically gain re-entry, but not all Florida students during the Idaho game were so lucky:

Danny Gibble started the “week of weird” running. He left the stadium after the game was suspended the first time to go home and eat some instant noodles. He heard the game was back on, and sprinted back two-and-a-half miles to the stadium just in time to miss what would be the game’s only play.

For broadcasters, it’s about killing time and staying on your toes.

“The producer or the director will tell the camera people, ‘Hey guys, we have a weather issue. We need you guys to hop off the cameras and get out,’” ESPN play-by-play announcer Adam Amin said. “And the producer will let me know if there’s weather in the area, and he’ll say, ‘Be aware, we might have to shut down for a little bit, so be prepared to go to studio, be prepared to go to break, be prepared to fill some time because studio may be doing something else.

Sometimes broadcasters have to fill time before coming on the air, called “tap dancing.” It’s not always the easiest thing to do.

“As a broadcaster, you have to understand that any time you do anything, you may have to tap dance in some way, shape, or form,” Amin said. “But when you’re in the middle of a game especially, and you’re focused and your attention is all dedicated to the game itself, or to whatever you’re doing in the broadcast booth, it’s such a 180 that you have to just be able to adjust fast, and it’s not always easy. We spend so much time preparing for games — when there is weather, yeah, we’re aware of it, we’re thinking about a couple things — but my main focus 99.5 percent of the time is the game itself.”

Because of college football’s intricate role in the national broadcast schedule, TV itself can cause a roundabout weather delay.

In 2016, an MLB weather delay elsewhere changed the Toledo-BYU kickoff time, because both games were on ESPN2, meaning analyst Mack Brown had to leave the booth mid-game to catch a flight.

“It was like a 1:20 a.m. flight out of Salt Lake City to Atlanta, and then Atlanta to Connecticut, so he could get back to the studio,” Amin said. “I think that the hope was, ‘Well, we’re going to be close, but you know, if it’s a game that’s decided, a blowout, maybe Mack can leave with a couple minutes to go and we can ride this thing out.’”

While there’s no clear-cut way to navigate delays, having a plan and modern technology helps.

In 10 years, maybe we’ll have devised a whole new way to approach them — lightning-resistant stadiums? Automatic draining fields? We’ll have to wait and see!

Sours: https://www.sbnation.com/college-football/2018/8/31/17122614/weather-rain-lightning-delays-college-football
White Sox Dave Cancels John Cusack - Barstool Rundown - October 11, 2021

Rainout (sports)

Rainout, washout, rain delay, and rain stopped play are terms regarding an outdoor event, generally a sporting event, delayed or canceled due to rain, or the threat of rain. It is not to be confused with a type of out in baseball, though a baseball game can be rained out. Delays due to other forms of weather are named "snow delay", "lightning delay", "thunderstorm delay", or "fog delay" (or generically "weather delay"), while there are many other effects of weather on sport. Also, a night game can be delayed if the floodlight system fails. Often spectators will be issued a ticket for a make up event, known as a "rain check".

Sports typically stopped due to the onset of rain include baseball, golf, tennis, and cricket, where even slightly damp conditions in the latter three sports seriously affect playing quality and the players' safety. In the case of tennis, several venues (such as those of Wimbledon and the Australian Open) have built retractable roofs atop their existing courts and stadiums in the last decade to avert rain delays that could push a tournament further than the final date.

Association football generally plays on through rain, although matches can be abandoned if the pitch becomes severely waterlogged or there is lightning in the area, with the latter case being more for the protection of spectators within the metal stands surrounding stadiums. In NCAA play, should lightning be detected by any pitch official, a minimum 30-minute delay and a potential "rainout" can be declared if the lightning continues for a considerable amount of time under the NCAA's all-sports policy regarding lightning.

In North America, the only one of the four major team sports to stop play due to rain is baseball, although football and soccer can be delayed if lightning is reported in the area. Individual sports such as golf, tennis and auto racing are also subject to rainouts, in the last case because a wet racetrack poses a risk of hydroplaning for vehicles traveling at high speeds, the combination of which can be fatal. Gridiron-style football almost always plays through even the heaviest of rain or snow, only canceling, relocating or delaying a game in the event that conditions are so severe as to be unsafe for spectators to attend (most commonly in the event of a lightning storm). Ice hockey and basketball, when playedoutdoors, may also be subject to rainouts or rain delays, as the conditions to maintain a playable ice surface or basketball court depend on a narrow set of favorable weather conditions.

If there is severe rain during a match, it can become a point of controversy whether a match should be abandoned. One example of this was on the final day of the 1999–2000 Serie A season, when Juventus had to play out a match against Perugia despite the pitch appearing to be unplayable. Juventus lost the match 1–0 on a second-half goal by Alessandro Calori and consequently lost the Scudetto to Lazio.[1][2]

Baseball[edit]

When the weather threatens to rain outa baseball game, the groundskeeperscover the infieldwith a tarpto protect it from damage.

Generally, Major League Baseball (MLB) teams will continue play in light to moderate rain but will suspend play if it is raining heavily or if there is standing water on the field. Games can also be delayed or canceled for other forms of inclement weather, or if the field is found to be unfit for play. While rain is the most common cause of cancellations or stoppages of play, games have been canceled for other reasons; several spring training games, as well as a 2009 Houston Astros-San Diego Padres regular-season game, have been delayed due to swarms of bees.[3][4]

Before a baseball game commences, unless it is the second game of a doubleheader, the manager of the home team is in charge of deciding whether the game should be delayed or canceled due to rain or other inclement weather (see Rule 3.10 of baseball's Official Rules). Once the home team manager hands his lineup card to the umpire shortly before the game is to begin, the umpiring crew chief has sole discretion to decide if a game should be delayed or canceled (see Rule 3.10 and Rule 4.01 of the Official Rules). This also applies to the second game of a doubleheader. Umpires are required by rule to wait at least 75 minutes to see if conditions improve; this is referred to as a rain delay and is not counted as part of the length of the game listed in the box score. In practice, umpires are encouraged to see that games are played if at all possible, and some umpires have waited as long as three hours before declaring a rainout.

If a game is rained out before play begins, it is rescheduled for a later date. If it has already begun and rain falls, several scenarios are used to determine the need to resume play:

  • If a game has completed the top half of the 5th inning and the home team is ahead, the game can be deemed an official game. The home team is declared the winner, and the game officially counts in standings.
  • If a game has completed the bottom half of the 5th inning and either team is ahead, and in Minor League Baseball and college games if it is the final game of the series, the game can be deemed an official game. The leading team is declared the winner, and the game officially counts in standings. However, if the game is rained out prior to the completion of an inning in which the visiting team scored one or more runs to take the lead, and the home team has not retaken the lead, the game is suspended, to be resumed at a later date.
  • If a game has completed the 5th inning, and the teams are tied, or in college and some Minor League Baseball games regardless of inning, and it is not the final game in the series (the first or second game in a three-game series, also regardless of inning), or in Major League Baseball starting in 2020, the game has started and has not reached official game status, the game is considered suspended, and the resumption of the game is scheduled for a future date (usually the following day). The game picks up from where it left off. All games stopped for power outages after the 5th inning are considered suspended if it is not the final game in the series, regardless of the game's score.
    • In the Major League Baseball postseason, regardless of inning, all games stopped at any time for weather or power outages are considered suspended and continued from the point of stoppage when play resumes, no matter if the game has not reached the requirements above.[5] This rule was put into place as a result of Game 5 of the 2008 World Series, which was the first postseason game in history to be suspended and resumed from the point of suspension. Prior to the 2009 postseason, a playoff game had to have at least five innings completed in order to be suspendable; a playoff game stopped prior to that point had to be started over. An example was Game 1 of the 1982 National League Championship Series, which reached the top of the fifth inning, but had to be restarted from scratch the next day.
  • If none of the previous scenarios apply, the game cannot be deemed official. The umpire crew chief declares "No Game," and a make-up of the game is scheduled for a future date unless it is not feasible. The latter occurs mainly among the minor leagues and college due to travel schedules, and only in the major leagues among teams that have been declared mathematically eliminated from postseason play where no benefit in the standings would be derived. The statistics compiled during the rained out game are not counted.

The scheduling of make up dates generally follow these guidelines:

  • If the game is postponed or suspended and both teams play each other the following day, then the game will be completed the next day as part of a doubleheader. Venue remains the same.
  • If the game is postponed or suspended and neither team has a game the following day, then the game will be made up the following day. Venue remains the same.
  • If the game is postponed or suspended, one or both teams play a different team the following day, and the teams meet again at the same venue later in the season, then the game will be rescheduled to a future series between the two teams at that venue, usually as part of a doubleheader. This mainly applies to division rivals.
  • If the game is postponed or suspended, one or both teams play a different team the following day, and the teams do not meet again at the same venue later in the season, then two options apply. Usually, the teams find a convenient shared open date to play the makeup game at the venue where the rainout occurred. In rare cases, if the teams play again later in the season, the game gets rescheduled to that series, usually as part of a doubleheader. For the makeup game, the team that would have hosted the game will wear their home jerseys even though the game is played at a different venue. This happened in 2013, when the Giants and the Reds met in a doubleheader at AT&T Park because a game between the two at Great American Ball Park was rained out and both teams had to play the following day.
  • If more than one game is postponed or suspended in a series, then the previous rules apply to each game separately.
  • If a makeup game must be postponed or suspended again, then the same doubleheader rules apply. This scenario is very uncommon.
  • Major League Baseball has never played a postseason doubleheader, preferring to postpone games to avoid such an occurrence. However, there was one doubleheader played in 1887 during a 15-game "World’s Championship Series" between the Detroit Wolverines and the St. Louis Browns.[6]
  • In Minor League Baseball, postseason doubleheaders can happen but are very uncommon; one such instance happened in 1994, when the first game of the Pacific Coast League's championship series between the Vancouver Canadians and the Albuquerque Dukes was rained out and the two teams played a doubleheader on the day of the second game.
  • If the teams are playing an international series and the game gets rained out, then the game will usually be made up at the neutral site as part of a doubleheader, but if that is not possible then the game gets rescheduled as part of a future series between the two at the designated home team's venue, usually as part of a doubleheader.
  • Triple headers are now prohibited under the current collective bargaining agreement, except when the first game is the conclusion of a game suspended from a prior date. This would only happen in the extremely rare case of the only remaining dates between teams being doubleheaders and no single games are left for the suspended game to precede. The last triple header occurred on October 1, 1920.[citation needed]

Domed stadiums[edit]

Some teams have built stadiums with a roof to protect the field, either as a domed stadium, or, more recently, with a retractable roof. Despite this, the Houston Astros, who played at the Houston Astrodome for 35 years and currently play at the retractable roof-equipped Minute Maid Park, had a rainout at the Astrodome on June 15, 1976 due to intense flooding in the Houston area. The game, against the Pittsburgh Pirates, was later made up at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh despite the Astros still having a home series against the Pirates later that season.[7]

Snow delay[edit]

Although rare, snow delays have occurred in baseball. This is usually the case in the early parts of the season that, although always starts after the springequinox, is still within the traditional snow season in the northern half of North America. In fact, the first ever game of the Toronto Blue Jays in 1977, although not delayed, was affected by a minor snowstorm.

In April 2007, snow storms in northern Ohio caused the Cleveland Indians to postpone their home opening series against the Seattle Mariners and forced the Indians to find a different location for their home series against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.[8] MLB took advantage of the roof at Miller Park (home of the Milwaukee Brewers) and moved the Indians-Angels series to Milwaukee. All seats were sold for $10 apiece, and attendance was 52,496 for the three games.[9] The Indians-Mariners games were eventually made up at various points in the season, including one game at Safeco Field during their regularly-scheduled series in Seattle as part of a doubleheader in which the Indians were the designated home team for the first game.

Motorsport[edit]

Some auto racing series do not compete in rain or snow, especially series that race on paved oval tracks. Rain and snow both severely diminish the traction between the slick tires and the surface. Other series, especially those that race on road courses such as Formula One and public roads as in rallying, use special treaded rain tires while the surface is wet but not in excessively heavy rain, snow, standing water, or lightning (which is an automatic cessation of racing because of pit crew, race marshals, and safety). Dirt track racing can be run in a light rain as the vehicles have treaded tires. Rallying can be held in rain or snow.

IndyCar and NASCAR do not compete on a wet or moist surface at most oval tracks, and do not compete at all during snowy conditions. They will not start an event unless the surface is dry. If the surface become wet during a race, the event is typically halted, and the cars are pulled off the track. Very light moisture may warrant only a temporary yellow caution period, while heavier rains or lightning usually require a red flag (stopped condition).

After the rain ceases, the sanctioning body will determine if the track surface can be dried within a reasonable time frame. The track is considered "lost" if rain thoroughly wets the surface, usually characterized by a dark look to the asphalt or concrete pavement. Track crews use jet dryers, which consist of modified jet engines, mounted upside down to allow the hot exhaust to pummel the surface. The hot exhaust acts to quickly evaporate the rainwater, and allow the surface to dry considerably quicker than normal conditions. Large scale wet-vacs are also sometimes used to supplement. While the rule primarily is enforced on ovals, on road courses, it will also be called if standing water (a safety hazard) becomes an issue according to drivers and the safety car officials.

The safety car driver will work with race stewards on the proper decision on a red flag when rain falls. In NASCAR, if the race start is delayed, officials may ask a more experienced driver to evaluate if a track is sufficiently dry by having the driver run medium-speed laps around the circuit to evaluate the dryness of the circuit. He then reports the results to his crew chief, who sends a report to a NASCAR official.

In rain conditions, officials may start the race under the safety car, and wave the green after a few laps have been run under such conditions. In that situation, all Safety Car laps count towards the race distance, but in IndyCar and NASCAR, only after both green and yellow are waved together (some laps may be run beforehand that do not count). However, officials may only allow the laps to count if the green flag is the next flag to wave and not the red flag, and officials may discard all laps run if cars do not complete a lap under green flag conditions. This procedure may be used by officials in an attempt to reach the race to official race status (halfway or three-fourths).

If rain does not subside, the sanctioning body has several options. Typically, the race is considered "official" if at least one lap beyond the halfway point of the advertised distance has been completed (similar to baseball). If such is the case, the race is deemed complete, and a winner can be declared. In some cases, if the race has already gone beyond the halfway point (especially if it is very near the scheduled finish) when rain falls, and the weather forecast is for day-long rain, no attempt to complete the remainder of the race will be attempted. If a downpour occurs very near the end of the race, the officials, in fact, may use their authority to wave the checkered flag at that instant, and end the race immediately (such as during the 1975 Indianapolis 500). However, if the event is stopped any lap before the halfway point, the remainder of the event can be postponed to the following day (such as during the 1997 Indianapolis 500 and the 2020 Daytona 500).

INDYCAR and NASCAR both will use rain tires if they are at a road course. However, if the rain is severe enough where standing water, visibility becomes an issue, or if lightning is detected within a 12 km radius of the circuit, the race will be stopped. At the 2014 Honda Indy Toronto Race 1, INDYCAR attempted to wave green and yellow together to start the race under the Safety Car. After numerous incidents, INDYCAR decided to abandon the race and wiped the slate clean for Sunday with two races. They also stopped the 2018 Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama before the halfway limit was reached because of heavy rain, and completed the race the next day. INDYCAR also has cancelled qualifying at a circuit because of lightning, primarily as a safety issue with electronics, radio communications, teams on pit lane, race marshals, and spectators.

The code in USAC, NASCAR, and IndyCar states if fewer than half the laps or time are completed or if the race is unable to start, the event is resumed on a later date, usually the next day. With the introduction of lights at numerous oval tracks, the time frame for resuming a rain delayed race on the same day has been largely expanded. Some races stopped during the day for rain have seen the track dried, and the race completed later in the evening on the same day. Since the 2017 season, all NASCAR national series utilize a format in which races are divided into three or four stages, with a competition caution after each; a race is considered official following the conclusion of the second stage, which is typically positioned around two quarters of the scheduled distance.

Most road racing (except in the United States) does not use the 50 percent rule. In the FIA Code, if severe rain forces the race to be interrupted, the regulations state if less than three laps were completed, the race is canceled and will not be made up. Once a race is on its fourth green flag lap, the race is official, and only half points will be awarded until 75% of the race has been completed.

Famous events delayed by rain in motorsport[edit]

The 1976 Indianapolis 500 was the shortest Indianapolis 500 in history, one lap past official status, with 102 laps completed.[10]

The 1976 Japanese Grand Prix was delayed because of rain. When the race eventually started, championship leader Niki Lauda pulled out because of the dangerous conditions, allowing James Hunt to score enough points to win the championship.

The 1992 Tooheys 1000 was drastically affected by rain, with the Dick Johnson Racing team leading the race on Lap 145 after a series of crashes at Forrest's Elbow. However, as the Winfield Racing Nissan team was part of a crash on Lap 144 at the section, the rules ordered a countback to the 143rd lap when the race was called to rain. The Nissan team was declared winner.

The MotoGP 2008 Red Bull Indianapolis Grand Prix was drastically affected by Hurricane Ike. The 250cc (now 600cc Moto2) class race was cancelled because of heavy rains, while earlier in the days the races in the 125cc (now 250cc Moto3) and MotoGP classes were curtailed because of weather.

The 2009 Petit Le Mans in Braselton, Georgia, was an example of a rainout under the FIA Code, where only three completed laps are needed for an official race and less than half the race (184 of 394 laps). The red flag waved after 184 laps at the 4:52 point of the race. In endurance racing, the clock does not stop for red flags. IMSA waited until 8 PM to declare the race official. While the race was 13 laps from official (500 miles), the clock had passed the five-hour mark when the race was called at 8 PM.[11]

At Formula One's 2009 Malaysian Grand Prix, a rainstorm was predicted to hit the half of the race of 56 laps, however, at the start of the race the weather was sunny with large black clouds in the distance. By lap 19 it began to rain as some drivers entered pit road for wet tyres as the rain was falling hard. By lap 28, the rain was torrential to the point officials called a caution, deploying the Safety Car, but still several cars were out due to spins or crashes. The rain became worse and the race was red-flagged on lap 33. Once the rain had ceased, it was deemed too late and dark to continue and the race was stopped. Some drivers and spectators protested the race organizer's decision but no action was taken. The 2009 season was the first year that the FIA started the Asia and Australia races as late-afternoon starts where the sun would be setting during the race finish in order to maximise European television broadcasts.

In the 2011 Canadian Grand Prix of Formula One, rain before the race wet the circuit. 30 minutes into the race, a heavy rainstorm hit the circuit and the race was red-flagged. The rain didn't stop quickly and the event was delayed for more than 2 hours, but the full distance was eventually run and was the longest race in Formula One history. To prevent a repeat, FIA rules were changed so that a four hour time limit (since changed to three hours in 2021) starts when the race starts. The clock will not be stopped for any situation, effectively ending a race three hours after cars roll off, regardless of how far the race has finished.

The 2012 Daytona 500 was postponed by rain for the first time in history, as it was postponed 30 hours from 1 PM Sunday to 7 PM Monday.[12]

The 2013 6 Hours of Fuji in the FIA World Endurance Championship was effectively cancelled because of rain; officials started the clock and ran laps under caution, hoping for conditions to improve; after 17 laps, all under caution, the race was effectively cancelled, but under FIA rules, was an official race. To prevent a repeat, FIA rules were changed to state the three completed laps rule to make a race official applied only to green flag laps.

The 2015 Petit Le Mans was shortened to 7 hours, 51 minutes after being under one weather delay earlier in the race; after a safety car with slightly over two hours remaining, the race was abandoned after 179 laps because of weather conditions related to Hurricane Joaquin and related heavy rains in the Southeastern United States.

The 2019 Japanese Grand Prix saw the qualifying session moved to the race day morning due to Typhoon Hagibis, a first in Formula One history. Parts of the track infrastructure were disassembled and then reassembled for race day because they were not expected to withstand the storm.[13][14] Though the typhoon had passed, high winds continued during the qualifying session and caused several crashes within minutes of the session start.[15]

Cricket[edit]

In cricket, when part of a game is rained out causing a reduction in the number of overs batted by one or both teams then the number of runs accredited to either one or both teams may be revised. A common method to recalculate the number of runs accredited to either team is the Duckworth–Lewis method.

Consequences in live broadcasting[edit]

In event of a rain delay, most television broadcasters run alternate programming (also known as "rain delay filler"), in place of the scheduled game or event. Depending on event, the alternate programming takes many forms, such as a movie, a rerun of a television program, interviews and analysis, highlights of the last event, or even another game or for networks such as ESPN and Fox Sports 1, "whiparound" coverage of other games from other regional sports networks (Fox Sports 1 also maintains a regularly scheduled program, MLB Whiparound). The delay continues until the weather is cleared up enough to resume the game, or if it comes to a point where it is not practical to resume it; in this case, it would become a "rain out".

In some cases, if the rain delay is in danger of interfering with the network's schedule that would follow after the game, they would often transfer coverage of the game to another station or channel, or show it later on via tape delay, depending on the organizational policy. For instance, with Sunday afternoon NASCAR events and Saturday night NHL games, a race on a broadcast network such as Fox or NBC would be moved to an alternate cable network such as Fox Sports 1 or NBCSN if the delay runs several hours, to allow those networks to present their prime time entertainment schedules (or, in NBC's case, its late night show Saturday Night Live, which has been protected from sports-related delays since an incident with the XFL in 2001), or later in NASCAR's season with NBC, allows contingency as NBC Sunday Night Football takes full contractual precedence over NASCAR events.

The Million Second Quiz was an example of a live broadcast of a game show that was filmed outdoors (it was filmed in an hourglass-shaped outdoor structure on top of a building with a flat roof). There was also an alternate indoor set where the non-primetime broadcasts took place. However, if inclement weather activity happened in the area where the show was filmed during primetime, the game show temporarily moved to its alternate set located inside the building. During the event, the clock did not stop for weather-related delays or other circumstances. The show was broadcast on NBC for only one season, after which it was canceled.

The 2011 NHL Winter Classic was scheduled to take place at 1 PM ESTNew Year's Day, but ended up delayed to 8 PM EST due to unusually warm weather in the Pittsburgh area, with rain impacting the game. Because the game was then moved to prime time, the game ended up having the unintended result of bringing in higher ratings for NBC in the United States, giving the NHL the highest ratings for a regular-season game since 1975.[16] Despite this, subsequent Winter Classics remain played in the early afternoon hours, as the game is purposefully scheduled at that time to avoid the College Football Playoffbowl games, mainly the Rose Bowl Game and Sugar Bowl most years. The NHL Outdoors at Lake Tahoe games which were played in February 2021 were likewise delayed from their original daytime starts on NBC to late night on NBCSN unexpectedly, due to bright sunshine affecting the quality of the ice surface along the shoreline of Lake Tahoe.[17]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Are soccer games canceled for rain? Shocking Conditions – Soccer Blade". soccerblade.com. Retrieved 21 October 2020.
  2. ^Hughes, Rob. Juventus Loses Crown in Perugia After Sudden Storm and Long Delay : Lazio Wins League In a Bizarre Finale, International Herald Tribune, May 15, 2000.
  3. ^Cole, Chris (9 March 2016). "Cactus League bees: A buzzing 13-year history". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved 21 October 2020.
  4. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-07-04. Retrieved 2009-07-02.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^"Official Rules: 4.00 Starting and Ending a Game". Major League Baseball. pp. Rule 4.12. Retrieved 9 October 2011.
  6. ^Olbermann, Keith (1 October 2011). "So The Last Post-Season Doubleheader Was…". Baseball Nerd. Retrieved 21 October 2020.
  7. ^"Hoffman: Astros made history with a rainout - Houston Chronicle". Chron.com. June 17, 2009. Retrieved April 2, 2013.
  8. ^Metzger, Stephanie. "Remembering Cleveland Indians' 2007 'Snow-pening Day'". wkyc.com. Retrieved 25 July 2021.
  9. ^Castrovince, Anthony (April 9, 2007). "Angels-Indians Series Moved". MLB.com. Cleveland. Retrieved February 15, 2009.
  10. ^Casey, Lauren (18 April 2016). "1976 Indy 500: Shortest Indy 500 on record". WRTV. Retrieved 25 July 2021.
  11. ^"Petit Le Mans: An Explanation". Motorsport.com. Archived from the original on 2011-06-06. Retrieved 2012-08-11.
  12. ^"Rained out: Daytona 500 postponed until Monday". Usatoday.com. 2012-02-26. Retrieved 2012-08-11.
  13. ^"Mercedes eye F1 history in Japan". BBC Sport.
  14. ^"How F1 is dealing with the threat of Typhoon Hagibis | Formula 1®".
  15. ^"How the Japanese GP unfolded". BBC Sport. 9 October 2019.
  16. ^"Winter Classic On NBC Is Top NHL Regular-Season Audience In 36 Years". SportsBusiness Daily. Street & Smith. January 3, 2011. Archived from the original on 4 January 2011. Retrieved 2011-01-16.
  17. ^"Ice breaker: Sun delays Tahoe outdoor game". ESPN.com. 2021-02-20. Retrieved 2021-02-21.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainout_(sports)

Similar news:

I just want to hear your story. The man was silent for a long time, pondering how to begin his story. All the moments of his betrayals, he did not intend to tell it too much it would be too difficult for. His wife to transfer the news.



1223 1224 1225 1226 1227