Diy collapsible storage bin

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Turn boring cardboard boxes into beautiful fabric storage boxes with this easy tutorial. 

As I was designing the console for our super awesome coffee bar, storage was a must! I try really hard to declutter, I throw away stuff all the time. I even got caught throwing out my kids artwork. Yikes! Luckily I was able to talk myself out of that one.

But even though I do not feel like I am anywhere close to being a pack rat, I also feel like there is always a pile of stuff I cannot find a home for. That is why I had to make sure I made our coffee bar with lots of storage.

The two drawers were a good starting point, but then I got crazy and added 4 of these easy DIY fabric storage boxes. Now I have lots of storage space for all those little piles.

Coffee bar station shown with diy fabric storage boxes.


I knew I wanted to put storage boxes on our coffee bar. We need the space to store extra K-cups (we love our coffee so we buy in bulk), random tea and coffee stuff that isn’t pretty enough to be displayed.

One of the boxes hides our wireless router, and the other is perfect for me to stash anything that accumulates on the edge of the kitchen island when company is coming over (always a good idea to have an empty place ready for this exact reason)!

DIY fabric storage boxes in green and white polka dots, blue with birds and multi.

The problem was I couldn’t find boxes that worked with the dimensions I wanted. I know, when you build it yourself you can make it fit anything, but most boxes are 12x12x12 and that dimension just didn’t work. It was too big for the console.

I didn’t want to change the size or height of the console, so I made the only change I could. I made the space for the boxes smaller. I knew I could come up with the perfect solution, hey that’s why I DIY 🙂

 Easy DIY fabric storage boxes four shown on book case.

I found this amazing tutorial from Craft Passion and knew I wanted to make my own DIY fabric storage boxes for our coffee console. So I started trying to find some boxes that would fit the space I made for them.

Apparently, that was too much to ask for too! I needed boxes that were 10″ wide x 10″ tall and about 13″ deep. I figured it wouldn’t be to hard to find a 10x10x12 box, but I was wrong! I couldn’t find anything but 12x12x12.

I eventually came across some boxes that were 9″ tall x 13″ wide x 13″ deep. So close to perfection. I figured I could work with that so I grabbed 5 (always good to have an extra).

4 DIY fabric storage boxes shown in coffee station.

How to Resize Cardboard Boxes:

You can make any cardboard box smaller before covering them in fabric. And it is easy with some glue and scissors. 

  1. Cut apart the tape at the bottom of box.
  2. Cut the box apart at opposite corners.
  3. Cut the front/back panels of the box to the desired size, plus a couple inches for a tab.
  4. Trim the sides of box also if needed.
  5. Fold over the tab so the front of the box is the size needed.
  6. Glue the tabs the inside of the sides with hot glue.
  7. Re-tape the bottom of the box closed.

For the side panels I cut them to size plus 2 inches. Then I folded the sides at the 2 inch mark. Using hot glue, I glued the 2 inch tabs to the back side of the front panels. Then I glued the bottom panels together and was ready to go! I ended up with a box that was 9 3/4″ x 9″ x 13″. Perfect.

empty card board box to be used for diy storage boxes

Sadly I got the boxes resized then left them uncovered for way too long! I do that way too often. I filled the uncovered boxes and put them to use, but if I’d have known how easy they were to finish, I would have done it earlier (I think).

How to Make DIY Fabric Storage Boxes

Supplies:

Start by cutting out the fabric. For each box:

  • cut one piece that is the length of the front, bottom, and back combined plus 2-3″ by the width of the box front plus 1″;
  • cut two pieces that are the height of your box plus 2-3″ and the depth of your box plus 2-3″

For each box I cut 1 piece at 10 3/4″ x 34″ for the front/bottom/back and 2 pieces at 15″ x 11 1/2″ for the sides.

decorative fabric shown with rotary cutter

Fold over 1/2″ on each side of the front/bottom/back piece and press (this is where the seam gauge comes in really handy).

cut fabric shown being ironed

Stitched a line 1/4 inch from the edge with a contrasting color for some added detail. I used a stitch on my machine that does a duplicate stitch (forward three, back one, forward three, back one, etc.) so it looks like a thick line of stitching.

If you don’t have this stitch on your sewing machine you can always use a thicker thread to get a similar look.

two pieces of fabric shown after being stitched

Now it’s time to glue. Add spray glue to the side pieces of the fabric. Be careful not to get it on the front of the fabric because it is permanent. 

Wrap the extra around the sides of the box and make sure they are glued down (use the fabric glue if you need extra glue, don’t try to spray it again or you will get it all over). The corners on the bottom of the box will need to be cut to lay flat.

cardboard box shown with fabric on two sides

Spray glue the front/bottom/back piece and center it on the box. Smooth it over the whole thing and wrap the edge inside the box. 

Originally I did not use extra glue on the edges of the boxes like the original tutorial called for. But my sweet children quickly made it necessary to use a stronger glue on the edges. I wouldn’t recommend skipping this step unless you don’t have kids 🙂

finished diy fabric storage boxes shown on shelf

Next, secure the handles. I didn’t take pictures since Joanne’s tutorial is so great. Make sure to check it out to see how to attach the handles. They look so great and I just love the decorative brads!

close up of fabric covered diy storage boxes with handles

To really make the boxes look fabulous and not homemade, don’t skip the step where you cover the unfinished inside edge with a fun ribbon. I couldn’t believe the difference it made.

The uneven, unfinished edge was instantly hidden and made to look even. I used a 3/8 inch wide ribbon so it was super forgiving. And it makes me smile every time I open a box.

diy fabric covered boxes shown filled with boxes of coffee

I was able to knock out all 4 boxes in about 4 hours, including the extra sewing! You can whip them up faster than you can binge watch a season of your favorite show on Netflix! And then you can quickly stash all of your unsightly piles and fake a perfectly clean house 🙂

If you like this project, don’t forget to subscribe to the newsletter where I will continue to share my love of DIY and all the projects in our home.

set of two fabric covered diy boxes shown in coffee station

Materials

  • Cardboard Boxes
  • Fabric
  • 1″ wide webbing
  • Fabric glue
  • Decorative brads
  • Ribbon

Tools

  • seam gauge
  • quilter’s rulers
  •  rotary cutter

Instructions

  1. Start by cutting out the fabric. For each box cut one piece that is the length of the front, bottom, and back combined plus 2-3″ by the width of the box front plus 1″.
  2. Cut two pieces that are the height of your box plus 2-3″ and the depth of your box plus 2-3″.
  3. For each box I cut 1 piece at 10 3/4″ x 34″ for the front/bottom/back and 2 pieces at 15″ x 11 1/2″ for the sides.
  4. Fold over 1/2″ on each side of the front/bottom/back piece and press (this is where the seam gauge comes in really handy).
  5. Stitched a line 1/4 inch from the edge with a contrasting color for some added detail. I used a stitch on my machine that does a duplicate stitch (forward three, back one, forward three, back one, etc.) so it looks like a thick line of stitching.
  6. Add spray glue to the side pieces of the fabric. Be careful not to get it on the front of the fabric because it is permanent. 
  7. Wrap the extra around the sides of the box and make sure they are glued down (use the fabric glue if you need extra glue, don’t try to spray it again or you will get it all over).
  8. Spray glue the front/bottom/back piece and center it on the box. Smooth it over the whole thing and wrap the edge inside the box. Secure the handles and you are done!

And the colors I chose work with our dining room bench perfectly! The dining room remodel is looking so good (only a couple more things on my to do list).

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Sours: https://craftingmyhome.com/easy-diy-fabric-storage-boxes/

Sewing Tools You Need

Click to Enlarge

These clever storage baskets are not only cute and handy, they’re also a secret recycling project. The sides and bottoms of each basket are stiffened with recycled cardboard! But wait … they have another hidden talent: they collapse and fold flat to store.

Click to Enlarge

These clever storage baskets are not only cute and handy, they’re also a secret recycling project. The sides and bottoms of each basket are stiffened with recycled cardboard! But wait … they have another hidden talent: they collapse and fold flat to store.

In the nursery, use them for creams, diapers, wash cloths and other diaper changing accessories. You could fill a whole shelf set with bright and beautiful baskets. And yet, why let the nursery have all the fun? We bet you have a lot of cardboard just waiting to be recycled. I see bread baskets and mail baskets and gift baskets … oh my!

Our sample was made for a baby girl’s nursery, using the stunning Patty Young Andalucia collection. For information on where to buy, read Stylish Baby Nursery: Designing with Bold Colors & Patterns. This article also includes suggestions for creating an alternate fabric palette that would work well for a boy’s nursery.

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  • Fabric for outer box covering (Fabric A) – ½ yard of 45″ wide fabric PER BOX: we used Patty Young’s Andalucia in Petal Flora (box 1) and Earth Mod Blooms (box 2)
  • Fabric for inside lining (Fabric B) – ¼ yard of 45″ wide fabric PER BOX: we used Patty Young’s Andalucia in Petal Jester (box 1) and Kiwi Jester (box 2)
  • Scraps for binding – you will need two strips per box, each strip is 1¾” x WOF (width of fabric). You can use either a contrasting fabric or a matching fabric: we used Patty Young’s Anadalucia in Petal Jester (box 1) and Petal Floral (box 2)
  • Chipboard, cardboard, or any heavy weight card stock (for box sides)
  • All purpose thread in colors to match fabrics
  • Leather machine needle(in addition to your regular needle)
  • See-through ruler
  • Chalk pencil
  • Scissors or rotary cutter and cutting mat
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Straight pins

We’re going to use a leather machine needle in this project – even though our supplies don’t call for leather. A leather needle is a super sharp, heavy-duty needle for sewing through difficult materials. Leather is one example; we’re using it for this project to sew through the cardboard that makes the sides of the boxes.

  1. Using your see-through ruler and chalk pencil, cut a 7½” x 9½” piece of fabric from Fabric A. Then, cut a strip from Fabric A that measures 6½” x 33″. These pieces will form the bottom and outside walls of the box.
  2. Cut two strips from the binding scraps that each measure 1¾” x WOF (width of fabric). We’ll use this for the binding of the box – the fabric around the top and bottom edges of the box.
  3. From Fabric B, cut one 7½” x 9½” piece and one 6½” x 33″ strip. These will cover bottom cardboard insert and the inside walls.
  4. From the cardboard, cut pieces as follows:
    Four pieces that measure 6″ x 3¼”
    Two pieces that measure 6″ x 8¾”
    One piece that measures, 6½” x 8½”

Creating the ‘walls’

  1. Fold the 6½” x 33″ piece of Fabric A (outer fabric) in half, with right sides together, and stitch up the 6½” side, using a ½” seam allowance. Turn right side out and pressseam open.
  2. Using the 6½” x 33″ piece of Fabric B (inner fabric), repeat step one.
  3. Place the sewn Fabric B piece inside the sewn Fabric A piece, placing them WRONG sides together and matching up the seam lines.
    Click to Enlarge
  4. Pin the bottoms of the two pieces together, and stitch around the bottom, using a ½” seam.
    Click to Enlarge
  5. Stitch down the existing vertical seam line created by the inner and outer fabrics. (This is the seam that was created when you sewed the fabrics into the ‘box’ – you should have lined these seam lines up in step 3.)
    Click to Enlarge
  6. This vertical seam will create a starting point to measure the other vertical seams around the box. With your chalk pencil, mark additional seam lines at the following intervals: 9″, 3½”, 3½”, 9″, and 3½”. (In other words, you mark 9″ from the first seam line, then 3½” from that newly drawn mark, then 3½” from that new one, etc, until you end up back at the starting line.)
    Click to Enlarge
  7. Stitch a vertical seam along each drawn mark. You should now have a total of six sewn vertical seam lines that join the outer fabric and the inner fabric with the wrong sides together. These vertical seam lines have created ‘capsules’ where we will insert the cardboard to make the box stand up. Quite smart, no?

Creating and attaching the bottom of the box

  1. With the wrong side facing up and the edges of the fabric inside the box, pin the 7½” x 9½” piece of Fabric A to the ‘walls’ you just made. This creates the box bottom.
  2. Align the corners of this bottom piece with the vertical seams on the wall, line up your raw edges, and match long sides to long sides and short sides to short sides. The raw edges of the fabric should extend to the outside of the box, and when you look into the box you should see the wrong side of the bottom fabric.
    Click to Enlarge
  3. Stitch all around, using a ½” seam. After attaching, carefully trim the seam allowance to ¼” – we will be absorbing this raw edge into the binding in the steps below, so we want to reduce the bulk as much as possible.

Creating binding and attaching to bottom

  1. Next we will create the binding for the bottom of the box. Find on of your 1¾” x WOF strips and trim to 1¾” x 34″ (this is the perimeter of the box plus 2″ for a tail we’ll use to finish our binding neatly). Fold the strip in half lengthwise and press. Now fold the raw edges in toward the middle lengthwise seam line, and fold together. Press. (Your raw edges are now inside the binding strip.
    Click to Enlarge
  2. Repeat to create your second binding strip for the top. Set this top piece aside. Remember, you can choose to use either matching or contrasting fabric for the binding; you could even make the top and bottom bindings out of different fabrics.
  3. Pin bottom binding strip to the bottom of the box, encasing the raw seam allowance inside the fold of your bias tape. Carefully pin.
  4. Stitch binding in place, keeping your seam line a “scant” (very small) ¼” in from the bottom folded edges, but still being sure to catch both sides of the bias tape in the seam. Stitch all the way around the perimeter of the bottom, but stop about 1″ from the end for finishing.
  5. We cut our original binding piece about 2″ longer than the perimeter (step #1 above), so you should have a slight tail at the end of your binding. Trim this to about 1-1½” (enough to overlap the start of your binding by about ½”). Fold under the end of the tail to create a clean edge and wrap around the start of the binding. Overlap about ½” and stitch in place, matching your seam line. Be sure to backstitch at the end of the binding to secure it in place.
    Click to Enlarge
    Click to Enlarge

Stiffening the walls with cardboard and attaching top binding

  1. Insert the cardboard pieces between the vertical seam lines to stiffen the walls of the box.
    Click to Enlarge
  2. Switch the regular sewing needle currently in the machine to the leather needle.
  3. Pin the other binding strip to the top of the box, encasing the raw edges and the top of the cardboard inside the binding.
  4. Stitch a ‘scant’ (very small) ¼” in from the edge of the binding.We are using the leather needle for this step because it is extra sharp and heavy duty for sewing through the cardboard. Attach the binding, following steps 4 and 5 above. Stitch slowly – your machine is working very hard to get through the thick cardboard – sort of like running uphill. You may find it helpful to lengthen your stitch length a bit at this point, so your machine can get the job done in less stitches.
    Click to Enlarge

Making the bottom insert

  1. Lay the 6½” x 8½” cardboard piece on the wrong side of the 7½” x 9½” piece of fabric B. Fold the edges of the fabric over the cardboard, being careful to keep the fabric tight on the corners. Press in place and stitch (you’re stitching through fabric and cardboard again so you should still be using the leather needle in your machine) around all sides to secure the fabric to the cardboard. Stitch close to the raw edge of the fabric so it will lay nice and flat. Press again after stitching.
    Click to Enlarge
  2. Insert the fabric covered cardboard into the bottom of the box, with the fabric side facing up.
  3. To collapse the box, simply remove this bottom insert; the short sides will fold in between the cardboard panels, and the whole thing will fold flat for storage.
    Click to Enlarge

Alternate box sizes

You can adapt the instructions above to any size box.

  1. First, determine the size you want the finished box to be, and cut the fabric to: the perimeter of the box plus 1/2″ all around (for the seam allowances) x the height you want the finished ‘walls’ to be. Cut one piece of fabric for the outside and one piece of fabric for the inside.
  2. Determine where you want the corners of your box, and stitch four vertical seam lines in those locations.
  3. Divide the seams on the SHORT sides in half, and stitch another seam line in this location (this allows the box to ‘collapse’ when you take out the bottom insert).
  4. Once you know where the corners of the box will be, you can cut your bottom fabrics to the appropriate size. You’ll need two pieces: one for the box bottom (add ½” all around for the seam allowance) and one for the cardboard bottom insert (add ¾” all around to give you enough fabric for folding over the cardboard).
  5. Then cut two pieces of binding long enough to fit the perimeter of the box plus about 2″ for finishing.
  6. Cut cardboard for sides to size to fit in the ‘capsules,’ and sew everything together. Just remember, the bigger the box you hope to create, the stiffer the cardboard will need to be to support the sides and the contents.

Contributors


Project Design: Alicia Thommas 
Sample Creation: Aimee McGaffey

Other machines suitable for this project include the White 2200 Multi-Tasker and the Singer 8673 Curvy.

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Sours: https://sew4home.com/stylish-baby-nursery-collapsible-storage-baskets/
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DIY Collapsible Storage Cubes

By: Mindy Miller from fiskars.com

Updated August 06, 2021

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DIY Collapsible Storage Cubes

DIY Collapsible Storage Cubes

This image courtesy of www2.fiskars.com

Fabric storage cubes keep your home neat and organized, but buying them individually can break the bank. This DIY collapsible storage cube pattern allows you to create the same great product with your own hands. This sewing pattern provides storage and organization for any room in your home; it can also be used in the car! This pattern can be designed to meet many style and size preferences. This easy sewing project will leave you wondering why you ever paid for a storage solution when you can make your own. It's time to get sewing!

Time to CompleteIn an evening

Easy

Project TypeMake a Project

Materials List

  • Canvas, home dec fabric, or coated fabric (depending on purpose)
  • Thread
  • Binding tape
  • Foamcore board, cardboard, or plastic mesh sheets
  • Webbing
  • RazorEdge™ Softgrip® Scissors (8")
  • Micro-Tip® Scissors (No. 5)
  • Coastal Colors Acrylic Ruler (6" x 24")
  • Cutting Mat (18" x 24")

Instructions:

  1. To get started, determine the height, width and length of the tote you intend to make. Create a pattern by drawing the bottom of the tote on a piece of paper. Measure and add the sides to the pattern; each size is the same height, which is the desired height of the tote. When complete, the pattern should resemble a cross design or an unfolded box cut apart at each corner.

  2. Use the pattern to cut two pieces of fabric. One will be for the outside of the tote and the other for the lining. You may want to use a contrasting or coordinating fabric for the lining.

  3. If you wish to add handles to the tote, cut a length of webbing and sew it to the right side of the fabric. Fold the ends of the webbing under before sewing.

  4. Once the handles are attached, place both pieces of fabric together (wrong sides facing each other). Stitch down the middle of each panel (vertically) with the handle. The stitching will run from the top edge to the bottom of the side panel.

  5. With the lining fabric facing you, begin to match and stitch the edges of the tote. To create a finished edge on a regular sewing machine, use a zig zag stitch.

  6. When all of the sides are stitched, turn the tote right side out. There will be a pocket on the front and back panel and two smaller pockets on each of the side panels. Cut cardboard or similar material to fit inside each pocket and insert. Then sew binding tape over the top edge to finish.

Hoarding is the curse of the thrifty and crafty. Find a creative storage idea to help organize the odds and ends in your life! 15 Creative Storage Ideas for Hoarders

15 Creative Storage Ideas for Hoarders
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Sours: https://www.cheapthriftyliving.com/sewing-patterns/DIY-Collapsible-Storage-Cubes-Fiskars

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins

Now that we’ve moved into our super cute new little farmhouse – I am doing tons of research into creative DIY fabric storage ideas! While this house is just about the cutest thing ever, I don’t have as much closet space, especially for crafting materials. So of course I had to research creative storage ideas – I want cute little bags and boxes that would be fun items to set out, as well as being useful!

Since it seems like you can never have enough storage ideas, I thought I’d share some of the sweet projects I’ve found! So today I have for you 12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins. I can’t wait to sew some of these up!

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes.

Here are links to all the tutorials!

Fabric Storage Boxes

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes: fabric storage box

DIY Reversible Fabric Storage Bins

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes.

DIY Fabric Boxes

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes.

Round Bottom Storage Bucket

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes: round bottom fabric bucket

Patchwork Bucket

Spring Form Bucket

Fabric Basket with Cut Out Handles

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes: Fabric Bucket (with cut out handles) Tutorial by Delia Creates

Fabric Bin Tutorial

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes.

Fabric Storage Basket with Handles

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes: DIY Fabric Storage Basket...with handles! --- Make It and Love It

Fabric Trays

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes.

DIY Collapsible Storage Bins

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes.

Nested Fabric Buckets

12 Creative DIY Fabric Storage Bins featured by top US craft blog, Flamingo Toes.

Aren’t they great?! Which DIY fabric storage bins do you want to make up first?

Filed Under: Home Decor, Sewing, Sewing for the HomeTagged With: Bins, Organizing, Storage

Sours: https://flamingotoes.com/12-creative-diy-fabric-bins/

Collapsible storage bin diy

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DIY Fabric Bins

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