100 dollar gold banknote

100 dollar gold banknote DEFAULT

One-Hundred-Dollar Banknote Commemorative Coin

One-Hundred-Dollar Banknote Commemorative Coin

One of the Founding Fathers that shaped the United States, Benjamin Franklin was also an author, a scientist, a diplomat, and a prolific inventor who developed several life-changing inventions. Inaddition to helping draft the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, Franklin served as the first Postmaster General, Minister to Sweden and France, and the 6th President of Pennsylvania. Today, you'll find his image on the $100 U.S. Banknote.

First introduced in 1862, the $100 bill originally featured a vignette of an American Eagle on the obverse. In 1914, Congress decided to honor Benjamin Franklin by putting his portrait on the banknote. The largest denomination banknote still in circulation, the $100 bill has been changed over the years but continues to honor this legendary Founding Father.

To stay ahead of counterfeiters, a new design for the $100 banknote was unveiled by the U.S. Department of Treasury on April 21, 2010, and featured a noticeablylarger portrait of Franklin and several colorful deterrents including a blue 3-D security ribbon with images of bells and 100s, and a color-changing bell in an inkwell. However, some of the high-techfeatures presented significant production problems which forced the Treasury to delay their release for more than three years, and the new bills finally made their official debut on October 8, 2013.

We're Proud to Offer the Ben Franklin 100 Dollar Banknote Coin
American Mint honors the legacy of this true American patriot with our gleaming Benjamin Franklin 100 dollar banknote coin. Luxuriously layered in 24k gold and minted to the highest quality "Proof" standard, this dazzling commemorative coin features a full-color reproduction of the newly released $100 bill. Framing the photo-realistic inset is a highly detailed engraving of Independence Hall just as it appears on the reverse of the original banknote. The back of the coin features the inscription "Federal Reserve Note" and depicts the "Eye of Providence" symbol.

A Unique 100 Dollar Banknote Coin at a Great Price
You can purchase our one hundred dollar banknote gold coin at a significantly discounted online price. You'll also get free shipping and handling if your order totals at least $150 — why not add several items to your collection? What's more, you can make interest-free payment installments if you spend more than $100.

Order Your 100 Dollar Banknote Coin Today!
Use our fast, easy, secure online checkout process to order your U.S. 100 dollar goldcoin.

If you have questions or need assistance, don't hesitate to call us at 1-877-807-MINT Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST.

Take a look at our entire inventory of commemorative coins and other fine collectibles.



Details
Limitation: 9,999 complete collections
Weight: 54 g
Material (details): Copper, layered in 24k gold
Diameter: 50 mm
Obverse: Benjamin Franklin $100 Banknote
Reverse: Federal Reserve Note
Finish: Colorized
Material: Copper, layered in 24k gold
Quality: Proof
Issue year: 2014
Sours: https://www.americanmint.com/one-hundred-dollar-banknote-commemorative-coin-us-9184911

Gold 100 Dollar Bank Note Cash Bill United States of America in God We Trust USA

SoldSee similar itemsEUR 10,59Buy It Nowor Best Offer, EUR 3,52 Shipping, 30-Day Returns, Garantie client eBay

Seller:Top-Rated Seller notinashyway✉️(21.362)100%, Location:Manchester, Ships to: Worldwide, Item:302515175545Gold 100 Dollar Bank Note Cash Bill United States of America in God We Trust USA. 100 Gold Dollar Bill 24Kt Gold Plated One Hundred Dollar Bank Note It is the size of a Standard Bank Note 130mm x 50mm One Side has the Image of US President Benjamin Franklin The other side has an illustration of Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania The finish is made with genuine pure 24k gold foil which has been layered & hot pressed onto flexible bicarbonate/plastic card for durability, the details and images on the note is excellent and of very high quality, with nice embossed & textured artwork. It has a metallic feel Would make a great gift inside a Birthday Card, Christmas Card, Good Luck Card ....etc Would make an Excellent Stocking Fillers at Christmas! In Excellent Condition I have a lot of Americana items on Ebay so Please...CLICK HERE TO VISIT MY SHOP Buy with Confidence please read my feedback from over 12,000 satisfied customerRead how quickly they receive their items - I post all my items within 24 hours of receiving payment International customers are welcome. I have shipped items to over 120 countries International orders may require longer handling time if held up at customs If there is a problem I always give a full refund Returns are acceptedIf your unhappy with your item please return it for a full refund I am a UK Seller with 10 Years of eBay Selling Experience Why not treat yourself? I always combine multiple items and send an invoice with discounted postage I leave instant feedback upon receiving yours All payment methods accepted from all countries in all currencies Are you looking for a Interesting conversation piece? A birthday present for the person who has everything?A comical gift to cheer someone up? or a special unique gift just to say thank you? You now know where to look for a bargain!S. Minor Pacific Islands (US) * U.S. Virgin Islands (US) * Uganda * Ukraine * United Arab Emirates * United Kingdom * United States * Uruguay * Uzbekistan * Vanuatu * Vatican City * Venezuela * Vietnam * Wallis and Futuna (FR) * Yemen * Zambia * Zimbabwe A banknote (often known as a bill, paper money, or simply a note) is a type of negotiable instrument known as a promissory note, made by a bank, payable to the bearer on demand. When banknotes were first introduced, they were, in effect, a promise to pay the bearer in coins, but gradually became a substitute for the coins and a form of money in their own right. Banknotes were originally issued by commercial banks, but since their general acceptance as a form of money, most countries have assigned the responsibility for issuing national banknotes to a central bank. National banknotes are legal tender, meaning that medium of payment is allowed by law or recognized by a legal system to be valid for meeting a financial obligation.[2] Historically, banks sought to ensure that they could always pay customers in coins when they presented banknotes for payment. This practice of "backing" notes with something of substance is the basis for the history of central banks backing their currencies in gold or silver. Today, most national currencies have no backing in precious metals or commodities and have value only by fiat. With the exception of non-circulating high-value or precious metal issues, coins are used for lower valued monetary units, while banknotes are used for higher values. The idea of a using durable light-weight substance as evidence of a promise to pay a bearer on demand originated in China during the Han Dynasty in 118 BC, and was made of leather.[3] The first known banknote was first developed in China during the Tang and Song dynasties, starting in the 7th century. Its roots were in merchant receipts of deposit during the Tang Dynasty (618–907), as merchants and wholesalers desired to avoid the heavy bulk of copper coinage in large commercial transactions.[4][5][6] During the Yuan Dynasty, banknotes were adopted by the Mongol Empire. In Europe, the concept of banknotes was first introduced during the 13th century by travelers such as Marco Polo,[7][8] with proper banknotes appearing 1661 in Sweden The United States one hundred-dollar bill ($100) is a denomination of United States currency. Statesman, inventor, diplomat, and American founding father Benjamin Franklin is featured on the obverse of the bill. On the reverse of the banknote is an image of Independence Hall. The $100 bill is the largest denomination that has been printed since July 13, 1969, when the denominations of $500, $1,000, $5,000, and $10,000 were retired.[1] The Bureau of Engraving and Printing says the average life of a $100 bill in circulation is 90 months (7.5 years) before it is replaced due to wear and tear. The bills are also commonly referred to as "Bens", "Benjamins" or "Franklins", in reference to the use of Benjamin Franklin's portrait on the denomination, or as "C-Notes", based on the Roman numeral for 100. The bill is one of two denominations printed today that does not feature a President of the United States; the other is the $10 bill, featuring Alexander Hamilton. It is also the only denomination today to feature a building not located in Washington, D.C., that being Independence Hall located in Philadelphia on the reverse. The time on the clock of Independence Hall on the reverse, according to the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing, showed approximately 4:10[2] on the older contemporary notes and 10:30 on the series 2009A notes released in 2013. One hundred hundred-dollar bills are delivered by Federal Reserve Banks in mustard-colored straps ($10,000). The Series 2009 $100 bill redesign was unveiled on April 21, 2010, and was issued to the public on October 8, 2013.[3] The new bill costs 12.6 cents to produce and has a blue ribbon woven into the center of the currency with "100" and Liberty Bells, alternating, that appear when the bill is tilted. The $100 bill comprises 77% of all US currency in circulation,[4] although according to former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, more than two-thirds of all $100 notes are held outside the United States Independence Hall is the building where both the United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution were debated and adopted. It is now the centerpiece of the Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The building was completed in 1753 as the colonial legislature (later Pennsylvania State House) for the Province of Pennsylvania and was used in that capacity until the state capital moved to Lancaster in 1799. It became the principal meeting place of the Second Continental Congress from 1775 to 1783 and was the site of the Constitutional Convention in the summer of 1787. A convention held in Independence Hall in 1915, presided over by former US president William Howard Taft, marked the formal announcement of the formation of the League to Enforce Peace, which led to the League of Nations and eventually the United Nations. The building is part of Independence National Historical Park and is listed as a World Heritage Site 1861: Three-year 100-dollar Interest Bearing Notes were issued that paid 7.3% interest per year. These notes were not primarily designed to circulate, and were payable to the original purchaser of the dollar bill. The obverse of the note featured a portrait of General Winfield Scott. 1862: The first $100 United States Note was issued. Variations of this note were issued that resulted in slightly different wording (obligations) on the reverse; the note was issued again in Series of 1863. 1863: Both one and two and one half year Interest Bearing Notes were issued that paid 5% interest. The one-year Interest Bearing Notes featured a vignette of George Washington in the center, and allegorical figures representing "The Guardian" to the right and "Justice" to the left. The two-year notes featured a vignette of the U.S. treasury building in the center, a farmer and mechanic to the left, and sailors firing a cannon to the right. 1863: The first $100 Gold Certificates were issued with a bald eagle to the left and large green 100 in the middle of the obverse. The reverse was distinctly printed in orange instead of green like all other U.S. federal government issued notes of the time. 1864: Compound Interest Treasury Notes were issued that were intended to circulate for three years and paid 6% interest compounded semi-annually. The obverse is similar to the 1863 one-year Interest Bearing Note. 1869: A new $100 United States Note was issued with a portrait of Abraham Lincoln on the left of the obverse and an allegorical figure representing architecture on the right. Although this note is technically a United States Note, TREASURY NOTE appeared on it instead of UNITED STATES NOTE. 1870: A new $100 Gold Certificate with a portrait of Thomas Hart Benton on the left side of the obverse was issued. The note was one-sided. 1870: One hundred dollar National Gold Bank Notes were issued specifically for payment in gold coin by participating national gold banks. The obverse featured vignettes of Perry leaving the USS St. Lawrence and an allegorical figure to the right; the reverse featured a vignette of U.S. gold coins. 1875: The reverse of the Series of 1869 United States Note was redesigned. Also, TREASURY NOTE was changed to UNITED STATES NOTE on the obverse. This note was issued again in Series of 1878 and Series of 1880. 1878: The first $100 silver certificate was issued with a portrait of James Monroe on the left side of the obverse. The reverse was printed in black ink, unlike any other U.S. Federal Government issued dollar bill. 1882: A new and revised $100 Gold Certificate was issued. The obverse was partially the same as the Series 1870 gold certificate; the border design, portrait of Thomas H. Benton, and large word GOLD, and gold-colored ink behind the serial numbers were all retained. The reverse featured a perched bald eagle and the Roman numeral for 100, C. 1890: One hundred dollar Treasury or "Coin Notes" were issued for government purchases of silver bullion from the silver mining industry. The note featured a portrait of Admiral David G. Farragut. The note was also nicknamed a "watermelon note" because of the watermelon-shaped 0's in the large numeral 100 on the reverse; the large numeral 100 was surrounded by an ornate design that occupied almost the entire note. 1891: The reverse of the Series of 1890 Treasury Note was redesigned because the Treasury felt that it was too "busy" which would make it too easy to counterfeit. More open space was incorporated into the new design. 1891: The obverse of the $100 Silver Certificate was slightly revised with some aspects of the design changed. The reverse was completely redesigned and also began to be printed in green ink. 1914: The first $100 Federal Reserve Note was issued with a portrait of Benjamin Franklin on the obverse and allegorical figures representing labor, plenty, America, peace, and commerce on the reverse. 1922: The Series of 1880 Gold Certificate was re-issued with an obligation to the right of the bottom-left serial number on the obverse. 1929: Under the Series of 1928, all U.S. currency was changed to its current size and began to carry a standardized design. All variations of the $100 bill would carry the same portrait of Benjamin Franklin, same border design on the obverse, and the same reverse with a vignette of Independence Hall. The $100 bill was issued as a Federal Reserve Note with a green seal and serial numbers and as a Gold Certificate with a golden seal and serial numbers. 1933: As an emergency response to the Great Depression, additional money was pumped into the American economy through Federal Reserve Bank Notes issued under Series of 1929. This was the only small-sized $100 bill that had a slightly different border design on the obverse. The serial numbers and seal on it were brown. 1934: The redeemable in gold clause was removed from Federal Reserve Notes due to the U.S. withdrawing from the gold standard. 1934: Special $100 Gold Certificates were issued for non-public, Federal Reserve bank-to-bank transactions. These notes featured a reverse printed in orange instead of green like all other small-sized notes. The wording on the obverse was also changed to ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS IN GOLD PAYABLE TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND AS AUTHORIZED BY LAW. 1950: Many minor aspects on the obverse of the $100 Federal Reserve Note were changed. Most noticeably, the treasury seal, gray numeral 100, and the Federal Reserve Seal were made smaller; also, the Federal Reserve Seal had spikes added around it. 1963: Because dollar bills were no longer redeemable in silver, beginning with Series 1963A, WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND was removed from the obverse of the $100 Federal Reserve Note and the obligation was shortened to its current wording, THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR ALL DEBTS, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE. Also, IN GOD WE TRUST was added to the reverse. 1966: The first and only small-sized $100 United States Note was issued with a red seal and serial numbers. It was the first of all United States currency to use the new U.S. treasury seal with wording in English instead of Latin. Like the Series 1963 $2 and $5 United States Notes, it lacked WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND on the obverse and featured the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on the reverse. The $100 United States Note was issued due to legislation that specified a certain dollar amount of United States Notes that were to remain in circulation. Because the $2 and $5 United States Notes were soon to be discontinued, the dollar amount of United States Notes would drop, thus warranting the issuing of this note. 1990: The first new-age anti-counterfeiting measures were introduced under Series 1990 with microscopic printing around Franklin's portrait and a metallic security strip on the left side of the bill. March 25, 1996: The first major design change since 1929 took place with the adoption of a contemporary style layout. The main intent of the new design was to deter counterfeiting. New security features included a watermark of Franklin to the right side of the bill, optically variable ink (OVI) that changed from green to black when viewed at different angles, a higher quality and enlarged portrait of Franklin, and hard-to-reproduce fine line printing around Franklin's portrait and Independence Hall. Older security features such as interwoven red and blue silk fibers, microprinting, and a plastic security thread (which now glows pink (nominally red) under a black light) were kept. The individual Federal Reserve Bank Seal was changed to a unified Federal Reserve Seal along with an additional prefix letter being added to the serial number, w. The first of the Series 1996 bills were produced in October 1995.[6] February 2007: The first $100 bills (a shipment of 128,000 star notes from the San Francisco FRB) from the Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas are produced, almost 16 years after the first notes from the facility were produced. The shipment makes the $100 bill the most recently added production to the facility's lineup. Four-point-six billion notes were produced at the facility with series 2006 and Cabral-Paulson signatures, including about 4.15 million star notes.[7] October 8, 2013: The newest $100 bill was announced on April 21, 2010, and entered circulation on October 8, 2013.[3] In addition to design changes introduced in 1996, the obverse features the brown quill that was used to sign the Declaration of Independence; faint phrases from the Declaration of Independence; a bell in the inkwell that appears and disappears depending on the angle at which the bill is viewed; teal background color; a borderless portrait of Benjamin Franklin; a blue "3D security ribbon" (trademarked "Motion" by Crane Currency[8]) on which images of Liberty Bells shift into numerical designations of "100" as the note is tilted; and to the left of Franklin, small yellow 100s whose zeros form the EURion constellation. The reverse features small yellow EURion 100s and has the fine lines removed from around the vignette of Independence Hall. These notes were issued as Series 2009A with Rios-Geithner signatures. Many of these changes are intended not only to thwart counterfeiting but to also make it easier to quickly check authenticity and help vision impaired people Benjamin Franklin FRS, FRSE (January 17, 1706 [O.S. January 6, 1705][1] – April 17, 1790) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Franklin was a renowned polymath and a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, freemason, postmaster, scientist, inventor, humorist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. As an inventor, he is known for the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove, among other inventions.[2] He facilitated many civic organizations, including Philadelphia's fire department and the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League institution.[3] Franklin earned the title of "The First American" for his early and indefatigable campaigning for colonial unity, initially as an author and spokesman in London for several colonies. As the first United States Ambassador to France, he exemplified the emerging American nation.[4] Franklin was foundational in defining the American ethos as a marriage of the practical values of thrift, hard work, education, community spirit, self-governing institutions, and opposition to authoritarianism both political and religious, with the scientific and tolerant values of the Enlightenment. In the words of historian Henry Steele Commager, "In a Franklin could be merged the virtues of Puritanism without its defects, the illumination of the Enlightenment without its heat."[5] To Walter Isaacson, this makes Franklin "the most accomplished American of his age and the most influential in inventing the type of society America would become."[6] Franklin became a successful newspaper editor and printer in Philadelphia, the leading city in the colonies, publishing the Pennsylvania Gazette at the age of 23.[7] He became wealthy publishing this and Poor Richard's Almanack, which he authored under the pseudonym "Richard Saunders". After 1767, he was associated with the Pennsylvania Chronicle, a newspaper that was known for its revolutionary sentiments and criticisms of the British policies. He pioneered and was first president of Academy and College of Philadelphia which opened in 1751 and later became the University of Pennsylvania. He organized and was the first secretary of the American Philosophical Society and was elected president in 1769. Franklin became a national hero in America as an agent for several colonies when he spearheaded an effort in London to have the Parliament of Great Britain repeal the unpopular Stamp Act. An accomplished diplomat, he was widely admired among the French as American minister to Paris and was a major figure in the development of positive Franco-American relations. His efforts proved vital for the American Revolution in securing shipments of crucial munitions from France. He was promoted to deputy postmaster-general for the British colonies in 1753, having been Philadelphia postmaster for many years, and this enabled him to set up the first national communications network. During the Revolution, he became the first United States Postmaster General. He was active in community affairs and colonial and state politics, as well as national and international affairs. From 1785 to 1788, he served as governor of Pennsylvania. He initially owned and dealt in slaves but, by the 1750s, he argued against slavery from an economic perspective and became one of the most prominent abolitionists. His colorful life and legacy of scientific and political achievement, and his status as one of America's most influential Founding Fathers have seen Franklin honored more than two centuries after his death on coinage and the $100 bill, warships, and the names of many towns, counties, educational institutions, and corporations, as well as countless cultural references. United States currency and coinage Topics Federal Reserve System Federal Reserve Note U.S. dollar U.S. (1751) Experiments and Observations on Electricity (1751) Birch letters (1755) The Way to Wealth (1758) Pennsylvania Chronicle (1767) Rules by Which a Great Empire May Be Reduced to a Small One (1773) Proposed alliance with the Iroquois (1775) A Letter To A Royal Academy (1781) Remarks Concerning the Savages of North America (1784) The Morals of Chess (1786) An Address to the Public (1789) A Plan for Improving the Condition of the Free Blacks (1789) The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (1771–90, pub. 1791) Bagatelles and Satires (pub. 1845) Franklin as a journalist Legacy Franklin Court Benjamin Franklin House Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology Benjamin Franklin National Memorial Franklin Institute Benjamin Franklin Medal Depicted in The Apotheosis of Washington Benjamin Franklin statue, Washington D.C. In popular culture Ben and Me (1953 short) Ben Franklin in Paris (1964 musical play) 1776 (1969 musical 1972 film) Benjamin Franklin (1974 miniseries) Liberty! (1997 documentary series) Liberty's Kids (2002 animated series) Benjamin Franklin (2002 documentary series) John Adams (2008 miniseries) Sons of Liberty (2015 miniseries) Sons of Ben (supporters group for the Philadelphia Union soccer club Refunding Certificate Franklin half dollar One-hundred dollar bill Washington-Franklin stamps other stamps Cities, counties, schools named for Franklin Franklin Field State of Franklin Ships named USS Franklin Ben Franklin effect Related Age of Enlightenment American Enlightenment The New-England Courant The American Museum magazine American Revolution patriots Syng inkstand Family Deborah Read (wife) Sarah Franklin Bache (daughter) Francis Franklin (son) William Franklin (son) Richard Bache Jr. (grandson) Benjamin F. Bache (grandson) Louis F. Bache (grandson) William Franklin (grandson) Andrew Harwood (great-grandson) Alexander Bache (great-grandson) Josiah Franklin (father) Jane Mecom (sister) James Franklin (brother) Mary Morrell Folger (grandmother) Peter Folger (grandfather) Richard Bache (son-in-law) Ann Smith Franklin (sister-in-law)Condition:In Excellent Condition, Returns Accepted:Returns Accepted, After receiving the item, your buyer should cancel the purchase within:30 days, Return postage will be paid by:Seller, Region:North America, Denomination:$100, Sub-Type:United States, Type:Notes, Year of Issue:?, Armed Forces/ Novelty & Replica Options:Novelty/ Replica Banknotes, Number of Notes:1, Era:Elizabeth II (1952-Now), Country:USA, Collections/ Bulk Lots:$100 Gold Bill, Country/Region of Manufacture:United States

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$100 Note

1861

Demand Notes

In order to finance the Civil War, Congress authorizes the U.S. Department of the Treasury to issue non-interest-bearing Demand Notes. These notes earn the nickname “greenbacks” because of their color. All U.S. currency issued since 1861 remains valid and redeemable at full face value.

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1862

The Foundation of Modern Design

By 1862, the Demand Notes incorporate fine-line engraving, intricate geometric lathe work patterns, a U.S. Department of the Treasury seal, and engraved signatures to aid in counterfeit deterrence. To this day, U.S. currency continues to add features to deter counterfeiting.

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1862

United States Notes

Congress authorizes a new class of currency, known as “United States notes,” or “Legal Tender notes.” These notes are characterized by a red seal and serial number. They continue to circulate until 1971.

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1863

A National Banking System

Congress establishes a national banking system and authorizes the U.S. Department of the Treasury to oversee the issuance of National Banknotes. This system sets Federal guidelines for chartering and regulating "national" banks and authorizes those banks to issue national currency secured by the purchase of United States bonds.

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1869

Centralized Printing of United States Notes

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing begins engraving and printing the faces and seals of U.S. banknotes. Before this, U.S. banknotes were produced by private banknote companies and then sent to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing for sealing, trimming, and cutting.

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1889

Names Added to Portraits

Legislation mandates that all banknotes and other securities containing portraits include the name of the individual below the portrait. This is why you see names below the portraits on banknotes to this day.

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1913

Federal Reserve Act

The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 establishes the Federal Reserve as the nation’s central bank and provides for a national banking system that is more responsive to the fluctuating financial needs of the country. The Federal Reserve Board issues new currency called Federal Reserve notes.

SEE FULL HISTORY TIMELINE

1929

Standardization of Design

The appearance of U.S. banknotes changes greatly in 1929. In an effort to lower manufacturing costs, all Federal Reserve notes are made about 30 percent smaller—measuring 6.14 x 2.61 inches, rather than 7.375 x 3.125 inches. In addition, standardized designs are instituted for each denomination, decreasing the number of designs in circulation and making it easier for the public to distinguish between genuine and counterfeit notes.

SEE FULL HISTORY TIMELINE

1971

United States Notes Discontinued

Because United States notes no longer served any function not already adequately met by Federal Reserve notes, their issuance was discontinued and, beginning in 1971, no new United States notes were placed into circulation.

SEE FULL HISTORY TIMELINE

1990

Security Thread and Microprinting

A security thread and microprinting are introduced in Federal Reserve notes to deter counterfeiting by copiers and printers. The features first appear in Series 1990 $100 notes. By Series 1993, the features appeared on all denominations except $1 and $2 notes.

SEE FULL HISTORY TIMELINE

1996

Currency Redesign

In the first significant design change since the 1920s, U.S. currency is redesigned to incorporate a series of new counterfeit deterrents. Issuance of the new banknotes begins with the $100 note in 1996, followed by the $50 note in 1997, the $20 note in 1998, and the $10 and $5 notes in 2000.

SEE FULL HISTORY TIMELINE

2013

The Redesigned $100 Note

In its first redesign since 1996, the new-design $100 note features additional security features including a 3-D Security Ribbon and color-shifting Bell in the Inkwell. The new-design $100 note also includes a portrait watermark of Benjamin Franklin that is visible from both sides of the note when held to light.

SEE FULL HISTORY TIMELINE

Sours: https://www.uscurrency.gov/denominations/100

National Gold Bank Note

Value$5, $10, $20, $50, $100, and $500
Security featuresNone
Years of printing1870 – 1875
US-NBN-CA-San Francisco-1741-1870-5-6758-B (obverse only).jpg
DesignVarious
Design date1870s
US-NBN-CA-San Francisco-1741-1870-5-6758-B (reverse only).jpg
DesignOrnamental with an array of United States gold coins
Design date1870s

National Gold Bank Notes were National Bank Notes issued by nine national gold banks in California in the 1870s and 1880s and redeemable in gold. Printed on a yellow-tinted paper, six denominations circulated: $5, $10, $20, $50, $100, and $500.[1] A $1,000 note was designed and printed but never issued.[2] During the issuing period of national gold banks (1871–83), the U.S. Treasury issued 200,558 notes[3] totaling $3,465,240.[1] Today, National Gold Bank Notes are rare in the higher denominations (and unknown on some issuing banks) with condition generally falling in the good-to-fine range.[nb 1] Approximately 630 National Gold Bank Notes are known to exist, and roughly 20 grade above "very fine".[4]

History[edit]

The National Gold Bank Notes were authorized under the provisions of the Currency Act of July 12, 1870.[5] The series was a result of the California Gold Rush, where gold coins were preferred in commerce.[6] Ten national gold banks were charted, nine of them in California and one in Boston, Massachusetts.

The Kiddler Bank was the only bank to have $1,000 notes among others prepared, however, no notes circulated from the bank.[7]

Issuing banks[edit]

Title City Charter Date[9]Denominations Total issue
The Kidder National Gold Bank[nb 2]Boston1699 15 Aug 1870 50, 100, 500, 1000[11]$120,000[12]
The First National Gold Bank San Francisco1741 30 Nov 1870 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500[11]$1,185,000[12]
The National Gold Bank and Trust Company San Francisco 1994 3 Jun 1872 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500[13]$853,750[12]
The National Gold Bank of D.O. Mills & Co. Sacramento2014 19 Jul 1872 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500[13]$270,450[12]
The First National Gold Bank Stockton2077 27 Jan 1873 5, 10, 20, 50, 100[13]$414,700[12]
The First National Gold Bank Santa Barbara2104 7 May 1873 5, 10, 50, 100[14]$80,000[12]
The Farmers National Gold Bank San Jose2158 21 Jul 1874 5, 10, 20, 50, 100[14]$242,590[3]
The First National Gold Bank Petaluma2193 25 Sep 1874 10, 20, 50, 100[14]$178,150[3]
The First National Gold Bank Oakland2248 10 Apr 1875 10, 20[14]$80,600[3]
The Union National Gold Bank Oakland 2266 20 May 1875 10, 20, 50, 100[14]$40,000[3]

Series overview[edit]

Value Image Plate dates Signatures[nb 3]Remarks[nb 4]
$5 alt1=$5 National Gold Bank Note, The First National Gold Bank of San Francisco1870, 1872, 1873, 1874 Edwin D. Morgan (cashier) and
Ralph C. Woolworth (president)[15]
427 reported
$10 alt1=$10 National Gold Bank Note, The First National Gold Bank of Oakland1870, 1872, 1873, 1874, 1875 Galen M. Fisher (cashier) and
Benjamin F. Ferris (president)[16]
117 reported
$20 alt1=$20 National Gold Bank Note, The First National Gold Bank of San Francisco1870, 1872, 1873, 1874, 1875 Edwin D. Morgan (cashier) and
Ralph C. Woolworth (president)[15]
71 reported
$50 alt1=$50 National Gold Bank Note, The First National Gold Bank of San Francisco1870, 1874 Edwin D. Morgan (cashier) and
Ralph C. Woolworth (president)[15]
7 reported[17]
$100 alt1=$100 National Gold Bank Note, The First National Gold Bank of Petaluma1870, 1873, 1874, 1875 Henry H. Atwater (cashier) and
Issac G. Wickersham (president)[18]
9 reported[19]
$500 None known 1870, 1872 Unknown[nb 5]
$1,000 None known 1870 Not issued[nb 6]

[edit]

  1. ^"Any National Gold Bank Note in crisp new condition is practically unheard of and is an outstanding rarity. The general condition in which these notes are found is one of advanced circulation and notes in very fine or better condition are extremely rare."[2]
  2. ^The Kidder National Gold Bank ordered 250 notes which were returned (in full) to the comptroller of the currency's office.[10]
  3. ^On the notes illustrated.
  4. ^All population and issuance statistics cited are attributed to the National Bank Note Census and were retrieved mid-May, 2014.[4]
  5. ^$500 National Gold Bank Notes were issued by only three banks. Four notes have not been redeemed but to date none have been reported.[19]
  6. ^The $1,000 National Gold Bank Note was not circulated.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ abZerbe, Farran (1898). "National Gold Bank Notes". The Numismatist. The American Numismatic Association. 30 (1): 158. Retrieved 27 May 2014.
  2. ^ abFriedberg & Friedberg, 2010, p. 160.
  3. ^ abcdeHuntoon, 1996, p. 126.
  4. ^ ab"The National Bank Note Census". The National Currency Foundation. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  5. ^"Collecting National Gold Bank Notes". www.numismaster.com.
  6. ^"National Gold Bank Notes". www.hokanson-coins.com. Retrieved 2012-06-05.
  7. ^About Paper Money - Large-size paper money - Early federal issues Coin World
  8. ^ abFriedberg & Friedberg, pp. 160–63.
  9. ^Huntoon, 1996, p. 121.
  10. ^Huntoon, 1996, p. 118.
  11. ^ abHuntoon, 1996, p. 122.
  12. ^ abcdefHuntoon, 1996, p. 125.
  13. ^ abcHuntoon, 1996, p. 123.
  14. ^ abcdeHuntoon, 1996, p. 124.
  15. ^ abcAnnual Report of the Comptroller of the Currency (Report). Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. 1879. p. 750. Retrieved 14 May 2014.
  16. ^Annual Report of the Comptroller of the Currency (Report). Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. 1876. p. 756. Retrieved 14 May 2014.
  17. ^Friedberg & Friedberg, 2010, p. 162
  18. ^Annual Report of the Comptroller of the Currency (Report). Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. 1879. p. 749. Retrieved 14 May 2014.
  19. ^ abFriedberg & Friedberg, 2010, p. 163

References[edit]

  • Friedberg, Arthur L.; Friedberg, Ira S. (2010). Paper Money of the United States: A Complete Illustrated Guide With Valuations (19th ed.). Coin & Currency Institute. ISBN .
  • Huntoon, Peter W. (1995). United States Large Size National Bank Notes. Society of Paper Money Collectors, Inc. ISBN .
  • Annual Report of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) (Report). Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. 1876. Retrieved 14 May 2014.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Gold_Bank_Note

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